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Full text of "Ahoy! - Issue 09 (1984-09)(Ion International)(US)"

COMMODORE USERS 



<? 



S2.50 /CAN, $2. 75 SEPT. 1984 



COMMAND YOUR 

DISKS 

WITH 

DOS 



w 



SAVE PROGRAMS 

--AND$- 

WITHA 

HOMEMADE CASSETTE 

INTERFACE 



MAKE BEAUTIFUL 
MEMORIES WITH 

VIDEO 

RAM 



YOU ARIi Al A MAGAZINE 
RACK THE MAGAZINE YOU 
ARE LOOKING AT, AHOY!, 
FEATURES ANYONE'S ADVEN- 
TURES IN WONDERLAND, A 
GUIDE TO PROGRAMMING YOUR 
OWN TEXT ADVENRJRES WHAT 
DO YOU DO'' 



TAKE THE PLUNGE! 
PLAY 
SALVAGE 
DIVER 

FOR THE C-64 



10 TOP 

WORD 
PROCESSORS 

REVIEWED 










FURTHER 1 


1 




UNRAVELING 1 
THE 

MYSTERIES 1 
OFSOUND.I 



MEET THE 
PROGRAMMING 

CHALLENGE 

OF 

COMMODARES 



REVIEWS OF 

■RELAX 
•OIL BARONS 

AND MORE 
FOR THE VIC AND 64...END 



P 











v 



^\ 



CARDCO "NOW" SOFTWARE 

. available now for your Commodore-64 and more! 



A fine line o( soflware developed by CARDCO tor your 
Commodore-64 computer with all the features you should 
expect in much more costly software. CARDCO's "NOW 
Series provides many unique and exclusive features and are 
packaged lor easy reference, simple storage, instant 
recognition. 

"WRITE NOW" . . . WORD PROCESSOR SOFTWARE ... An 

excellent time saver, CARDCO offers the "Write Now" C/ 02 
word processor program with built-in 80 column display. You 
see exactly what will print. All special codes can be 
transmitted to printers ma Intaf ning justification. Easy full-screen 
editing: works with any printer. 

"MAIL NOW" . . . MAILING LIST SOFTWARE . . . CARDCO's 
D/ 01 "Mall Now" quickly (In memory) sorts by zip, category, 
name and state; fully compatible with 'Write Now". Other fine 
features include: user-oriented; menu-driven operation; each 
disk supports 600 entries, format can print single, double or 
triple labels across. 

"SPELL NOW" . . . Cardware D/ 04 ... a fine program 
designed as a spell checker lor use with 'Write Now" on the 
Commodore-64. A 34,000 word dictionary with two additional 
user constructed dictionaries. Menu-driven operation for ease 
of use. And "Spell Now" allows you to see each misspelled 
word in the context of your document for correction. 

"FILE NOW" ... D/ 05 ... is a totally integrated, menu-driven 
database software package which interfaces with both the 
'Write Now!" tor the 64 and the "Spell Now." 40K of working 
storage space Is available with "File Now". "File Now" 



appears on the screen as index cards for easier 
manipulation of your data base; you see 5 index cards at a 
time. Cards are user defineable, i.e., user determines what 
goes where on the "index cards" and can sort by any given 
field. Every card has a general topic field which allows for 
quick sorting through cards. 

"GRAPH NOW" INCLUDING . . . "PAINT NOW" ... D/ 06 

. . . This disk-based graphic/logo generator is totally menu- 
driven. Allows for the development of pies, charts, bar 
graphs and other vivid graphic illustrations. Also has the 
ability to design, and print logos and high resolution 
pictures. "Commodore-ready"; Interfaces with CARDCO'S 
Write Now" Word Processor, "Mall Now", "Spell Now" and 
"File Now". 

Write for illustrated literature and prices or see CARDCO 
Computer Accessories and Soflware wherever Computers 
are sold. 





cardco, inc. 



300 S. Topeka Wichita, Kansas 67202 (316)267-6525 
"The world's largest manufacturer of Commodore accessories." 

Comnxxkxe'" is a registered trademark ol Commodore Business Systems. Inc 



Render Service No. 1GB 




CONTENTS 



DEPARTMENTS 

A View from the Bridge. . .of the September Ahoy! 
Scuttlebutt. . .this fall's hottest 64 and VIC releases. 
Reviews. . .software and hardware put to the test. 



35 






Commodares. , . expanded— more challenging than ever! 47 
Program Listings. . .from our back pages to your screen. 79 



FEATURES 

In Search of a Word Processor, Part II by Sanjiva Nath 11 
Anyone's Adventures in Wonderland by Orson Card* 17 



10 Uses for a Word Processor by Ed Hoornaert 



25 



Building a C-64 Cassette Interface by Anthony Scarpelli 31 



The Rupert Report. . .Dale turns on to Video RAM. 



70 



^Includes program: The Castle of Darkness 



PROGRAMS 

DOS for the C-64 by Bob Uoret 



21 



Salvage Diver for the C-64 by B. W. Behling 



22 



Sound Explorer for the C-64 by David Barron 



29 



Base Conversions for the 64 and VIC by Drexel Gibson 77 
Bug Repellent for the 64 and VIC by Kleinert and Barron 80 



Cover illustration by James Regan 
(Illustrations in screens by James Regan and Kevin Walter) 



Publisher 
Michael Schneider 

Editor 
David Allikas 

Managing Editor 
Robert J. Sodaro 

Senior Editor 
Tim Moriarty 

Consulting Editors 

Ben Bova 

Morton Kevelson 

Dale Rupert 

An Director 
Raoul Tenazas 

Associate Art Director 
Jo Ann Case 

An Production 

Christopher Carter 

Pauline Ciordani 

Eve Griffin 

Technical Advisors 

David Barron 

Edward D. Laufer 

Bob Lloret 

Circulation Director 
W. Charles Squires 

Advertising Director 
Lynne Dominick 

Director of Promotion 
Joyce K. Fuchs 

Controller 
Dan Tunick 

Managing Director 
Richard Stevens 

Advenising Representative 

JE Publishers Representative 

6855 Santa Monica Blvd., Suite 200 

Los Angeles, CA 90038 

(213)467-2266 
Boston (617)437-7628 
Dallas (214)660-2253 
New York (212)724-7767 
Chicago (312)445-2489 
Denver (303)595-4331 
San Francisco (415)864-3252 

AHOY! No. 9, September I9«4. Published monthly 
by [on International Inc., 45 W. 34th St., Suite 407. 
New York, NY. 10001. Subscription rate: 12 issues 
for Siy.95. 24 issues for S37.95 (Canada S26.95 and 
$49.95 respectively). Application to mail at 2nd Class 
postage rates is pending at New York. NY and ad- 
ditional tnaiu'nf; offices. 19K4 by Ion Internation- 
al Inc. All rights reserved. I under Universal In- 
ternational and Pan American Copyright conven- 
tions. Reproduction of editorial or pictorial content 
in any manner is prohibited. No responsibility can 
be accepted for unsolicited material. Postmaster, 
SCOd address changes to Ahoy!, 45 W. 34lh Street, 
Suite 407, New York, NY 10001. All editorial and 
subscription inquiries and software and hardware 
to be reviewed should be sent In 45 \V. 34th St.. Suite 
407, New York, NY' 10001. 



VIEW l=l?OM THE I3RI3GE 



Have mercy, our readers begged! The programs in 
Ahoy! are so good that we can't resist typing them 
all in. . .but at 20-25 hours of typing per month, 
our Fingers are going to succumb to bone disease! 
Put them on disk for us each month, they pleaded. 
We'll pay anything. Anything! 

We agree— your Fingers have earned a rest. Begin- 
ning this month, you can receive all the programs 
in each issue of Ahoy! on a veriFied disk — for only 
$7.95 (less if you subscribe). You'll Find complete 
information on page 78 of this issue. 

Included on our September disk (and in our 
September issue): 

DOS by Bob Lloret. which reduces all the disk 
commands commonly executed by C-64 users to a 
single keystroke. (Turn to page 21.) 

Salvage Diver by B.W. Behling, a C-64 game that 
takes you to the ocean floor in search of the 
treasure of the shipwrecked S.S. Marie. (Turn to 
page 22.) 

The Castle of Darkness, part I of the text adven- 
ture presented this month and next in Orson Scott 
Card's Creating Your Own Games on the VIC and 
64. (Turn to page 17.) 

Sound Explorer, part of the conclusion of David 
Barron's Unraveling the Mysteries of Sound, which 
lets you have a party with the amazing capabilities 
of the C-64's SID chip. (Turn to page 29.) 

Base Conversions by Drexel Gibson, providing 64 
and VIC users with an easy means of switching 
from decimal to hexadecimal to binary. (Turn to 
page 77.) 

Programs from back issues are also available on 
disk. Sec prices on the coupon on page 78. (Ultra-be- 



ginners please note: though each monthly disk will 
contain all the programs in a particular issue, you 
will only be able to run those designed for your 
system, be it 64 or VIC.) 

As for the rest of the September issue of Ahoy!: 

Sanjiva K. Nath's In Search of a Word Processor 
concludes this issue, with reviews of 10 top pro- 
grams for the C-64. (Turn to page 11.) 

On August's cover we promised 10 Uses for a 
Word Processor. It was squeezed out at the last 
minute. Ed Hoornaert's informative feature appears 
in this issue, however. It really does. Honest. We're 
not kidding this time! (Turn to page 25.) 

With the millions of new Commodore 64 owners, 
we felt many might not yet have purchased a disk 
drive or even a datasette. If that applies to you, we 
caught you just in time! You can save money with 
Anthony Scarpelli's Building a Cassette Interface 
for your C-64. (Turn to page 31.) 

Dale Rupert takes a peek at the memory locations 
associated with the video display in this month's 
Rupert Report on Video RAM. (Turn to page 70.) Of 
course, Dale has a new batch of Cotnmodares wait- 
ing for you as well. (Turn to page 47.) 

Our Scuttlebutt and Reviews sections have been 
shortened this time by space restrictions. They'll be 
back to full scale next month, along with Flotsam. 
(Please keep writing as you have been — either to 
chat or to ask technical questions. David 
Barron will be answering as many of the latter as 
space permits in our newest column— S.O.S.— 
premiering shortly.) 

Thanks for picking up the September Ahoy! 

—David Allikas 



WHY SHOULD FIVE SOFTWARE PACKAGES COST AS MUCH AS YOUR COMPUTER? 



IT DOESN'T MAKE MUCH SENSE. . what Commodore/64 owners are 
paying for software these days. Thanks to inflated dealer/distributor 
mark-ups, 54 owners have to spend as much lor five software packages 
as they did lor their computer. Furthermore, because distributors control 
the market, many better versions of arcade and adventure games never 
hit the retail counters. 

As producers of original software, PL1 MICRO is attempting to correct the 
market by offering superior products with only one mark-up instead of 
three. In other words, great games at unbeatable prices. 

'Available in disk only for the Commodore/64. Ail software guaranteed 
with a liberal replacement policy. 

Send check or money order plus 51,50 shipping and handling. Illinois 
residents add 7% sales tax. 



•KEEPERS Of THE KRYPT - ten-level, machine 
language. . easily the best playing, most action-filled 
game of its genre. The variety of play with each new 
start up keeps interest going for hours on end. An 
added feature is choice of male or female role. 
Only S12.95 



lo 

3- 



•THE SOAP OPERA GAME - trivia games ant) soap 
operas are the rage of the nation . . . here is a computer 
game that combines both. 500 questions played on a 
TV game show board will challenge the most dedicated 
fan. Play it solo or with a fellow addict. 
Only $11.95 



•Commodore 64 is a registered Iradenwk ol Commodore Business Machines 



PLI MICRO P.O. Box 688 Skokie. IL 60076 (312)334-7523 



4 AHOY! 



Reader Ssrviee No, 188 




*m 



uommoaore 
Owners, Relax. . . 

with Mirage Concepts software 




im«f«M. 



software. Before you buy — we help you determine which 
Mirage Concepts package will meet your need. No guesswork! 
With your purchase comes a menu-driven program ranked 
by independent evaluators nationwide as among the finest 
available. Relax as you learn how to operate your program 
with clear, concise tutorials written by professional writers. . . 
not programmers. For consultation on your special questions, 
technical support personnel are standing by on a toll-free basis. 



For Brochures. Support 
ami Information. Cull... 

(800) 641-1441 

In California. Call... 

(800)641-1442 



DATABASE MANAGER, 889.95 

• 100% Machine Language • Free Form Design • Sort On Any Field • Calculated Fields 

• Interfaces In W.V. * Record Size = 2,000 Characters 

ADVANCED REPORT GENERATOR, 549.95 

• Companion to Database • Totals and Subtotals ■ Field Matching • Expanded Reports 

• Sorting (Up & Down) • Calculated Fields 

WORD PROCESSOR, Professional Version $89.95 

• 80 Col w/o Addl'l Hdwr • 100% Machine Language • Spelling Checker (30.000 Words) 

• Over 70 Single Keystroke Commands • Printer Command File • Interfaces to Database 



WORD PROCESSOR, Personal Version $39.95 

• 100% Machine Language • True Word Wrap • Printed page/ line/character counters 

• Right Justify, Center • Printer Command File • Interfaces to Database 

mRAGc concEPtt, inc. 

2519 W. Shaw Ave., #106 • Fresno, CA 93711 

TM — Cnmmndore 64 is a Registered Trade Mark of Commtufcire Electronics, Ltd. 
R«ad*r Service No. 10V 



IT STARTED IN '81 when our president, 

the designer of the VIC-20 r left 

Commodore to open his own company. 

His goal was to build an American 
tradition ... THE BETTER WAY. 




Our RS-232 Serial Interfaces allow you to 
connect printers, modems, plotters, and other 
input/output devices to your 64 or VIC-20. 



Commodore produced good computers 
that were economical for families. 
Our president wanted to provide 
Commodore owners with better 
peripheral products. 

In less than two years, MSD was 
shipping interfaces that expanded 
the Commodore 64, VIC-20, and 
PET computers into business and 
developmental applications ... THE 
SERIOUS WORLD OF COMPUTING. 

Next, determined to BUILD IT BETTER, 
MSD developed SUPER DISK I and II ... 
exceptionally fast and durable disk 
drives that NEVER OVERHEAT. 

MSD's dual drive formats, copies, and 
verifies in less than two minutes ... 
compared to 30 or 40 minutes with 
TWO Commodore 1541s. This 
unparalleled speed has made SUPER 
DISK II the hottest product introduced 
for the Commodore line of computers! 

Add the six month warranty, and you 
can see why our dealers and their 
customers believe in us. MSD 
SYSTEMS, INC. ... Call us today for 
your nearest local dealer. 




■ 



V< 



s 




A parallel interface allows direct access between a 
Centronics printer and your software program, 
saving you loading and waiting time. Our CPI is 
compatible with most software written for the 64 
and VIC-20. 




For professional-quality video and audio output, 
our Monitor Link Cables can connect your 64 
or VIC-20 to a high-resolution black/white or 
color monitor, or a CRT terminal, and to a stereo 
system. 



<% 



The CEX-4 Expandoport gives you four additional 
ports for interfaces and peripherals. 




Save time and hassle with the greater 
speed of an IEEE Interface. The unit is 
'transparent' to your computer's expansion port, 
allowing hookup to any peripheral without 
interference. With this interface, your 64 or 
VIC-20 can gain CBM/PET-type control over the 
IEEE-4S8 bus. 

Dealer and distributor inquiries invited. 




10031 Monroe Dr. • Suite 206 • Dallas, Texas 75229 
214-357-4434 • Outside Texas 800-527-5285 



FUmter Swvln NO. 189 



SCUTTLEBUTT 




The Commodore 16 is designed to introduce the novice to computer literacy. 
READER SERVICE NO. 170 



CONSUMER ELECTRONICS SHOW REPORT • COMMODORE 16 AND PLUS/4 
COMPUTERS • WINDHAM CLASSICS • MATH, SCIENCE, AND GRAMMAR 
PROGRAMS • LOW-COST KEYBOARDS • MUSIC SYNTHESIS SOFTWARE • 
GRAPHICS PACKAGES • NEW GAMES FROM DATASOFT AND ACTIVISION 



THE HITS KEEP 
COMING 

At last January's Consumer 
Electronics Show (the semiannual 
showcase for all that's new in the 
industry), Commodore towered 
over its competitors as the clear 
microcomputing leader. This 
June's exhibition only reaffirmed 
Commodore's position, with more 
manufacturers than ever falling 
over one another to stoke the 
C-64 with software and peripher- 
als. An occasional booth still dis- 
played software only for the Atari 
or Apple — but we're betting that 
well see them at next January's 
show with Commodore added, or 
we won't see them at all. 

Commodore 64 owners should 
be pleased to know that their 
computers will continue to be 
supported by a larger array of 
software than any other micro 
The heavy competition should 
also lead to lower prices. Some 
manufacturers at CES showcased 
C-64 programs for as little as 
SI0.00— and in one case $5.00. 

The prognosis is not as good 
for VIC 20 owners. Support for 
that machine has long since 
peaked and is heading steadily 
down. Commodore will not con- 
firm that production of the VIC 
has ceased/ will cease; the com- 
pany line is that as long as de- 
mand for the computers continues, 
Commodore will continue manu- 
facturing them. But that demand, 
based solely on the VIC's lower 
price as compared to the 64, will 
drop off in the face of the just-as- 
cheap and significantly more pow- 
erful. . . 



COMMODORE 16 

As predicted in the May Ahoy!, 
reiterated last issue, and finally 
verified at the June CES, Com- 
modore will manufacture a 16K 
computer designed to offer the 
first-time computer user an inex- 
pensive (around $100) introduction 
to microcomputing. Built-in fea- 
tures of the Commodore 16 (to be 
advertised as "The Learning Ma- 
chine") will include machine lan- 
guage monitor, graphics and 
sound commands, BASIC 3.5. and 
screen window capability. It will 
work with the MPS 802 dot ma- 
trix printer. 

If the description of the C-16 
sounds familiar, it may be because 
the new machine is basically a 
Commodore 264 with less mem- 
ory and some other shortcomings. 
The latter computer, announced in 
these pages as early as March, 
was also exhibited at the June 
CES— as it was at the January 
CES. While still unavailable, it 
sported a new name: the Plus/4. 
(Commodore felt the name change 



necessary to prevent the mistaken 
assumption that the new machine 
has four times the memory of the 
C-64.) It will feature not one, as 
Commodore previously announced, 
but four built-in programs: word 
processing, database, spreadsheet, 
and graphics. Price will be around 
$300? 

The Plus/4 is scheduled for ear- 
ly fall release, the C-16 for some- 
time in the second half of 1984. 

Commodore, 1200 Wilson Drive, 
West Chester, PA 19380 (phone: 
215431-9100). 

CLASSIC SOFTWARE 

Richard Herring said it in our 
Educational Software series: any- 
one who thinks educational soft- 
ware discourages kids from read- 
ing isn't playing with a full circuit 
board. Further debunking the 
theory comes the Windham Clas- 
sics series from Spinnaker, a line 
of graphics/text adventures based 
on enduring literary works. 

For players aged 10 to adult, the 
games place the player in the role 

AHOY' 7 



of the novel's hero or heroine, 
facing the problems they face and 
compelled to make decisions. 
Available in October on disk for 
the C-64 will be Swiss Family 
Robinson, The Wizard of Oz. Gul- 
liver's Travels, and Below the Root 
(based on the Green Sky trilogy). 
Following those will be Treasure 
Island and The Wind in the Wil- 
lows. Prices will be in the $30- 
$40 range. 

Windham Classics, Spinnaker 
Software Corp., One Kendall 
Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 
(phone: 617494-1200). 

EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Three educational programs 
from DesignWare in addition to 
the Notable Phantom package de- 
scribed elsewhere: 




Grammar Examiner, C-64 edition. 
READER SERVICE NO. 171 

The Grammar Examiner, a com- 
puterized board game, starts kids 
10-14 off as cub reporters and lets 
them work their way up to editor- 
in-chief by correcting copy and 
answering grammar questions. In- 
cluded are over 150 multiple 
choice questions and paragraphs 
with numerous grammatical mis- 
takes; additionally, the built-in 
grammar editor lets you add your 
own. Available in August 

In order to re-create the course 
of his lost sister ship, the 13-18 
year old player of Mission: Alge- 
bra must solve problems that in- 
volve coordinating pairs on a 



1 huiiy tffifi u ) | pcstanUMTt'" 1 




/ . 


l«l for * 
C/J for - 
IF J to enter 
a fraction 
C4-) to erase 
(HI for help 
(H) to display 


i > 




(Clourse? 

III )e>;t lii.il 1.-. '■ 
7,2 1 




H*i« plot The alien's location. 
U«* Th*> t-J-K-M keys to **ovt the 
mm%w, jnd SPACF BRfl to plot- 





Mission: Algebra— outer space plot. 
READER SERVICE NO. 173 

graph, determining the equation of 
a line, and solving for "x" and 
"y" coordinate pairs. Touching 
the help key will cause the base 
station to respond with two levels 
of strategies for solving the prob- 
lem. Scheduled for September or 
October release. 

States & Traits, for families 
with children aged nine up, re- 
quires players to place states and 
topographic features in their prop- 
er positions on a U.S. map and 
answer questions about U.S. land- 
marks and history. Already avail- 
able. 

Each on disk for the C-64, at 
$44.95. 

DesignWare, 185 Berry Street, 
San Francisco, CA 94107 (phone: 
415-546-1866). 

First Star Software touts its U.S. 
Adventure as the first true educa- 
tional program to utilize adventure 
game techniques. The player joy- 
sticks cross-country, entering dif- 




Map a strategy in States & Traits. 
READER SERVICE NO. 172 



ferent states and scoring points by 
answering questions about them. 

Also from First Star: the first 
installment in its Romper Room 
Little Learner series, employing 
such characters as Do-Bee, Up 
Up, and Kimble from the TV se- 
ries to teach young children a va- 
riety of skills. This first. Romper 
Room's I Love My Alphabet, uses 
an animated character that dances, 
hides, jumps, etc.. to reinforce the 
meanings of action words. 

Both for the 64 from First Star 
Software, Inc., 22 East 41st Street, 
New York, NY 10017 (phone: 212- 
532-4666). 

Because computers operate in a 
linear fashion, most educational 
software does likewise, claims 
Prentice-Hall. But the human 
brain operates in parallel fashion, 
touching on a variety of subjects 
at once. So the Arrakis Advantage 
series they will begin distributing 
in time for the fall '84 semester 
will utilize the Socrates Learning 
Environment to allow students to 
interrupt the program at any point 
to ask questions, test themselves, 
review, and explore other subjects. 
Socrates himself leads students 
through the programs which cover 
a variety of math and science sub- 
jects. 

Coming in August: Algebra I, 
Volumes I and 2; Algebra II, Vol- 
ume 1; and volumes 1 of Chemis- 
try, Geometry, and Physics. In 
September: Algebra HI, Volumes J 
and 2 and volumes 2 of Algebra 
II, Biology, Chemistry, and Phy- 
sics. In October: Biology, Volumes 
1, 3, and 4, Geometry, Volume 2, 
and Statistics, Volumes 1 and 2. 
$39.95 each, on disk for the 
C-64. 

Prentice-Hall, P.O. Box 819, En- 
glewood Cliffs, NJ 07632 (phone: 
201-592-2611). 

/ PROGRAM THE SONGS 

In the beginning, C-64 owners 



8 AHOY! 



played music right on their key- 
boards. Soon after that came in- 
terfaceable piano-style keyboards 
that brought users much closer to 
an actual musical experience — and 
the bottoms of their bank ac- 
counts. Now, combining low price 
and a measure of realism, come 
piano-style keyboards that fit over - 
your 64's keys. 

DesignWare's Notable Phantom 
music education game ($49.95) 
includes a polyethylene keyboard 
overlay providing an octave and a 
half of black and white "keys." The 
software, first in DesignWare's 
Musical Teacher series, uses 
ghouls and ghosts to lead children 
aged 5-10 through a variety of ex- 
ercises teaching keyboard and 
notereading skills. 

DesignWare, 185 Berry Street, 
San Francisco, CA 94107 (phone: 
415-546-1866). 

The 31 plastic keys of Sight & 
Sound Music Software's Incredible 
Music Keyboard ($39.95) let you 
play over an eight-octave range. 
Using the included music software 
you can create piano, guitar, syn- 
thesizer, and other musical 
sounds. If you like, you can start 
playing music almost instantly, us- 
ing the included ABC note stick- 
ers and Letter Music Song Book. 
Also included is the Melody 
Chord Song Book for the more 
experienced. Software available 
from Sight & Sound for use with 
the keyboard includes the Kawa- 
saki Synthesizer, Kawasaki 
Rhythm Rocker, the Music Pro- 
cessor, 3001 Space Odyssey, Tune 
Trivia, and Rock Concert. 

Sight & Sound Music Software, 
Inc., 3200 South 166th Street, 
New Berlin, WI 53151 (phone: 
414-784-5850). 

UPDATES FROM ENTECH 

One more musical note: EnTech. 
has revised its Studio 64 program 
to incorporate high-res graphics 




Incredible Music Keyboard; 31 keys. 
READER SERVICE NO. 174 

that make the notes easier to read, 
full musical notation including 
sharps, flats, and ties, and the ca- 
pability of using control keys to 
move from one voice to another, 
adjust ADSR envelopes and filters, 
and save and load songs more 
quickly. Four new original sample 
songs are also included. Price is 
$39.95, or mail your old version 
plus $10.00. 10-song demo disk is 
available for $5.00 (no postage 
charge if prepaid). 

EnTech also announced a "talk- 
ing" version of its Space Math 
educational program that will re- 
produce the intonations, accents, 
and character of real speech. Sim- 
ilar enhancements of Management 
System 64 and Studio 64 (educa- 
tional version) will follow later 
this year. Price of Space Math is 
$39.95. 

EnTech Software, 10733 Chiqui- 
ta, Studio City, CA 91604 (phone: 
818768-6646). 

NEW GAMES UPDATE 

Activision's Pitfatl II: Lost Cav- 
erns, forecast in these pages in 
July, is now available. This sequel 
takes Pitfall Harry (plus niece 
Rhonda and mountain cat Quick- 
claw) to Peru in quest of the 
stolen Raj Diamond. The caverns 
consist of two cliffs beveled by 
ledges and separated by chasms 
(which Harry crosses with a bal- 
loon), and a river with waterfalls. 




... Sonar reports the "whine" of torpedoes 
running toward you. You kick the destroyer's 
rudder full-right end order flank speed. 

As you watch, two torpedoes cross your bow. 
Sonar returns quicken and you close on the sub- 
marine below. Suddenly, bearing to target shifts 
180 degrees and the sonar return is instan- 
taneous. THE SUB IS DIRECTLY BELOW! You 
stab the fire button end watch as 6 depth charges 
arch into your wake. Several long seconds pass 
before they explode, sending six domes of white 
water to the surface. The message "SUBMARINE 
SUNK" flashes on the screen. But congratulations 
are brief. Four more subs ere lurking out there 
somewhere, trying to escape into the open ocean. . . 

SONAR SEARCH is a "last-action" strategy game 
based on anti-submarine warfare. You are the 
commander of a group of three destroyers sent to 
intercept a pack of 5 enemy submarines. Equipped 
with sonar gear and depth charges, and aided by 
submarine sightings from otherships and aircraft, 
you must get directly over a sub to score a hit with 
your depth charges. 

SONAR SEARCH makes lull use of the high- 
resolution graphics, multicolor and audio Cap- 
abilities of the Commodore 64, Programmed in 
machine language to provide immediate response 
to your commands. SONAR SEARCH is realistic, 
educational and entertaining. Comes complete 
with Instruction Manual and keyboard template. 



»6 COMMODORE 64" 

(CHECK ONE: 
Commodore" 64 Tape □ or Disk D ($29,951 
Manual Only D {$5.00 if purchased separately) 

I Name 



City. 



State. 



Zip. 



USA & CANADA add $2.50 postage & handling 
($4.00 foreign) for each game ordered. All payments 
must be in USA funds, all foreign payments must be 
against USA banks. PA residents add 6% stale sales 
lax. Or charge to: 



Q MasterCard 
Card No 



D VISA D E«p. Date. 



Signature . 



"^V 



SEND TO: 

SIGNAL COMPUTER CONSULTANTS. LTD, 
P.O. Box 18222 • Pittsburgh, PA 15236 

(412) 655-7727 

Reader Servlcn No. ISO 

AHOY! 



Unsuccessful encounters with 
scorpions, bats, condors, and 
other deadly pests send Harry 
back to the last mystical healing 
cross he touched. C-64 disk is 
$31.95, cartridge $34.95. 

Four more C-64 games from 
Activision, slated for fall release: 

As the Zone Ranger you must 
brave an unexplored sector of the 
universe, surviving deadly drones, 
planetoids — and battle on thirty 
graduated levels. Passing through 
the Super Portal puts you in a 
space vacuum from which you 
must steal elements to replenish 
your power. 

In Explorer you probe the ruins 
of a deserted planet, selecting de- 
fense systems, reading complex 
maps, and crossing danger-laden 



5DRIUJflRE 
HflNDBDDH 

For the C-64 

Th| a book "BLOWS THE LDCKS Off" proteelod 
□IS«5, CARTRIDGES, and TAPES! ProTflCtlon 
"■oc^ett" are clearly nplainrd along wltn 
BHi^ntial information and orocedurea CO 
follow Far Breaking protected sort-are. An 
ARSENAL of protection Dreeking software ia 
included with ALL LISTINGS. providing you 
witn the tools you need 1 Programs irclude 
high speed error check/ logging diek 
duplicator... Disk picker... uiak editor... 
Beyond track 35 Error analyzera... Error and 
header modification routines... Cartridge to 
diak/tape uaver end several othere for arrar- 
handling and ADVANCED disk breaking. The 
certridge methnde allow you to save and run 
Cartridges from dlak or tape! The tepa 
duplicatcr has never bean beaten! This 212 
page maruel is an invaluable reference aid 
including computer and disk maps, disk HQK 
dump instructions, GCP napa and explanations, 
as well aa many other useful tablee end 
Charta. Includes 11 main prograna and ten 
disk controller routines. 

For lha VIC-10 

The Vic-20 book covera o wealth of 
Infornation for brooking Vic prograna on 
Cartridges and Tapea. Me liat all aoftwere 
and give you scnematlce For all circutta. 
There ia no other book like thlo 1 A must for 
any VIC-SO owner! 

CBa Book only S16.9SUS 

CBd Book E Dlak of ALL programs SZ9.35US 

Vic ?D Book J9.951J5 

Tope Duplicator Kit S9.95U5 

Standard recorder interface Ki t ...... S 19 . 95U5 

Heeet switch Kit. S6.95US 

** SHIPPING In U.S. add S2.00 *« 
Overseas Ai r a dd 5.10. OD 

_ Th i s' WANUAL Q0 E5 NOT CONDONE PtRACT ' 

DflOEfl FHOKi PSIOAC.DEPTC 

7326 N. ATLANTIC, PORTLAND, OR 97217 

- CHECK 0P MONEY DPOLP DHL T - 

Reader Service No. 177 



plains in a hunt for artifacts, 
tools, and other items needed for 
survival. 

Wonderbolt puts you in the 
overpaid shoes of a construction 
worker, racing the clock to bolt 
uncooperative girders into their 
blue-print pattern. 

To complete our descent from 
the exotic to the mundane. Camp 
Ctean-Up lets you, as a park 
ranger, pick up litter from the 
campgrounds and lake, rescue 
swimmers, and avoid other camp 
dangers. 

Activision, Inc., 2350 Bayshore 
Frontage Road, Mountain View, 
CA 94043 (phone: 415-960-0410). 

Four C-64 games from Datasoft. 
each retailing for S29.95: 

Trying to keep your Mancopter 
on its flight pattern requires keep- 
ing flocks of birds out of your 
propellers and dodging opponents 
that can land you in shark- and 
squid-infested waters. 

Meridian III requires you to 
guide your spaceship past energy 
globes and space mines and 
through the Warp Tunnel en route 
to assaulting the Dragon Lord's 
fortress city. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
PROGRAM 

Though it sounds like a fast 
food restaurant item, McTerm 64 
is actually a communications pro- 
gram for use with a C-64, disk 
drive, and modem. It allows you 
to control communications set- 
tings, onscreen characters, and 
transmission speed (up to 1200 
baud). Other features include a 
clock to help keep track of that 
long distance bill, word wrap and 
auto linefeed options, and the 
ability to preset the program to 
send files at a desired time. Sug- 
gested retail $49.95. 

Madison Computer, 1825 Mon- 
roe Street, Madison, WI 53711 
(phone: 608-255-5552). 



Juno First, wherein you must 
destroy waves of aliens encircling 
your spaceship, is one of two ar- 
cade adaptations. The other. Lost 
Tomb, lowers you into 91-chamber 
maze within an ancient Egyptian 
tomb packed creatures. 

Datasoft, Inc., 19808 Nordhoff 
Place, Chatsworth, CA 91311 
(phone: 818-701-5161). 

LET'S GET GRAPHIC 

The Activision Pencil is named 
for its goal of reducing graphics 
programming to the simplest pos- 
sible terms. The user can draw by 




Peripheral Vision has 35 textures. 
READER SERVICE NO, 175 

using keyboard commands or en- 
tirely via joystick. The first 
screen, a computer ''palette," in- 
cludes over 75 graphics and musi- 
cal commands; on the second a 
pencil (complete with eraser) exe- 
cutes the commands. On disk and 
cartridge for the C-64. in the fall. 

Activision, Inc., 2350 Bayshore 
Frontage Road, Mountain View, 
CA 94043 (phone: 415-960-0410). 

Peripheral Vision, available with 
Futu rehouses Edumate Light Pen 
($59.95 the set) or separately, of- 
fers 15 colors, 6 brush widths, 35 
textures, mirror, zoom, copy, fill, 
and move, and the ability to mix 
keyboard characters with graphics. 
For the C-64. 

Futurehouse, P.O. Box 3470, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 
(phone: 919-967-0861). □ 



10 AHOY! 




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WORD 



with disk or tape, and any properly interfaced print- 
er. It may be configured from 40 to 240 columns for 
text entering. This is especially useful when working 
with large tables. DOS functions are available from 
within the program. The main memory can hold up 
to 799 lines of text. The command line on top of the 
screen lets you know what function or mode you are 
currently working in. This line is also used by the 
system to display any prompts for additional infor- 
mation as well as DOS error messages. 

The program supports the standard editing keys on 
the C-64 for convenience in text entering and edit- 
ing. Output may be directed to the screen prior to 
printing, so that you may look at the format before 
printing. You can also send special control codes to 
your printer to access special print effects. Files may 
be linked on disk for continuous printing. 

mmmmmmmmm 



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PROCESSOR 



FOR YOUR 
COMMODORE 64 
PART II: REVIEWS 




By Sanjiva K. Nath 

ast issue we introduced you to word pro- 
cessing on the C-64 and its applications. 
We also discussed the features associated 
with the commercially available word pro- 
cessing programs. Using these features as guidelines, 
a set of criteria were established to assist you in se- 
lecting the right program to match your specific 
needs. 

In this article, we will provide brief reviews of ten 
popular word processors for the C-64. (These re- 
views have been adapted from Vie Commodore 64 
Software Buyer's Guide by Sanjiva K. Nath and 
Terry Silvcria — Robert J. Brady Co.) Along with our 
previously established criteria, these reviews will 
provide you with tools to compare and evaluate any 
given word processing program from dozens that are 
presently available for the C-64. Following these re- 
views, we have also provided a table that compares 
the features in these programs. For more details on 
the specific features, refer to the glossary provided 
last issue. 

EASY SCRIPT 

Commodore; diskette, $49.95 

This is a comprehensive word processing program 
available at an exceptionally low cost. It can be used 



***mm*+*mmmi*mnm*m*m*mnmmm*mm 

Special features include the 40-240 column text 
entering, decimal tab set, capital lock, and automatic 
horizontal and vertical scrolling (panning). Mail 
merge facility is also available for creating personal- 
ized form letters. The program works with the Easy 
Spell spelling checker, also from Commodore. 

Commodore Business Machines, 1200 Wilson 
Drive, West Chester, PA 19380 (phone: 215- 
43 1-9100). 

HESWRITER 

HesWare; cartridge, $4435 

Heswriter is a simple, easy-to-use word processor 
for the C-64 which is directed at the novice user. 
However, it lacks some sophisticated features found 
in other comparably priced word processors, the 
most important being the lack of full-featured edit- 
ing. The program is cartridge-based, with no printer 
configuration or DOS functions support. 

A special text entering mode is used to enter text. 
This mode may not be used to fully edit text. 27 
screen lines of text (36 characters per line) are al- 
lowed with no word wraparound feature. The edit 
mode allows text editing, although in this mode you 
cannot enter text. Each line of text is identified by 
the text editor with a line number, which may be 

AHOY! U 



INTRODUCING ACTMSION 



; " ■ ■ l i '- -. 



SEE YOURSELF IN A 



# * * ' 




■,;• JbSr:.-;, ■ ■,'. v,j?= WHS 
•••;;•:■:;■'■ _\\.\ p..x ..;..-. 

Mb 

Pi ■■■■■-. - 

SMrftSS 



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I 




You leave the sun behind as you lower yourself 
down into the unexplored caverns beneath 
the Peruvian jungle. Deeper and deeper you go. 
Past Amazon frogs, condors, and attacking 
bats. Across eel-infested underground rivers. 
From cavern to cavern, level to level. Swim- 
ming, running, dodging, stumbiing, you search 
for the gold, the Raj dia- 
mond and the thing you 
really treasure . . . adven- 
ture. Head for it. Designed | 
by David Crane, 




You have heard the elder speak of one central 
source and a maze of unconnected grey paths. 
As you connect each grey path to the central 
source, what was grey becomes the green of 
life.When all are connected, then you have 
achieved "Zenji!" But beware the flames and 
sparks of distraction that move along the paths . 
You must go beyond strat- 1 
egy, speed, logic.Trust 
yourintuition.The ancient j 
puzzle awaits. Designed 
by Matthew Hubbard. 




You strap on your helicopter prop-pack, check 
your laser helmet and dynamite.There's no 
predicting what you'll have to go through to 
get to the trapped miners. Blocked shafts, 
molten lava, animals, insects.who knows what 
lies below. But you'll go, you're in charge of 
the Helicopter Emergency Rescue Operation. 
The miners have only one | 
chance.You.The opening 
shaft is cleared now. it's 
time to go. Designed by 
John Van Ryzin. 





7* 



What if you were silling in from of your Commodore 64 " programming your own Pitfall Harry"" adventure? It 
can happen with a little help from the creator of Pitfall Hairy: David Crane. Just write your name and address 
on a piece of paper, tape 25c to if for postage and handling and mail to: The Actjvision C-64 Club, P.O. Box 7287, 
Mountain View. CA 94039. We'll send you David's Booklet. "Programming Pitfall Harry" It includes a written 
program that helps you create your own adventure. Go for it. 



FOR YOUR COMMODORE 64. 



DIFFERENT LIGHT 








As you suit up you see the webbed forcefield 
surrounding your planet. Holding it.Trapped 
with no escape. No hope. Except you: The 
Beamrider.The freedom of millions depends 
on you. Alone you speed along the grid of 
beams that strangle your planet.You must de- 
stroy the grid sector by sector. Your skills and 
your reflexes alone will 
determine the future of 
your peopIe.Take their 
future in your hands. 
Designed by Dave Rolfe. 



Villi 




You can almost hear the quiet.And it's your 
job to keep it that way. A toy factory at midnight. 
Did you hear something? Guess not.Wrong! 
Suddenly balloon valves open, conveyor belts 
move and a whole factory full of toys goes 
wild. Even the robot, their latest development, 
is on the loose and after you. Capture the 
runaway toys. Restore 
order. Restore peace. 
Restore quiet. Do some- 
thing! Hurry! Designed 
byMarkTurmell. 




You made it.The Olympics.You hear languages 
you've never heard. And the universal roar 
of the crowd.You will run. Hurl.Vault.Jump. 
Ten events. One chance.You will push yourself 
this time. Further than ever. Harder than ever. 
But then ... so will everyone.The competition 
increases, now two can compete at the same 
time.The crowd quiets. 
The starting gun sounds. 
A blur of adrenalin. 
Let Ihe games begin. 
Designed by David Crane. 




Commodore fAT is a trademark of Commodore Electronics, Ltd. C 1984. Activision, Inc. 

Re«d»r S»rvlo« No. 16T 




diVlsioN 

We put you in the game. 



m il ium * 




»l "l Ml l l li 



■# 



■ HU ii U P W i m 



Covered in de- 
tail in our 
March issue, 
Easy Script of- 
fers compre- 
hensive word 
processing at 
an exceptional- 
ly low cost. 
READER 
SERVICE 
NO. 132 



used to find that line for future editing. Text is print- 
ed by specifying the beginning and ending line num- 
bers. Control characters are placed within the text 
for formatting an output. 

A great deal of effort is required to use this word 
processor, and for the novice user, it may prove to 
be a useful learning experience. 

HesWare, 150 North Hill Drive, Brisbane, CA 
94055 (phone: 415-468-4111). 

PAPERCLIP 

Batteries included; diskette, $125.00 

PaperClip is one of the most comprehensive word 
processing programs for the C-64. It offers most 
standard editing and print formatting features along 
with a few unusual ones not encountered elsewhere. 
Considering the price tag, decide whether these nov- 
elties are worthwhile to you. 

The program is configurable with a number of 
printers via the special printer files available on the 
system diskette. DOS function support and screen 
color settings are available in the initial options. Text 
entering and editing are accomplished using the stan- 



Lets you move, 
delete, insert, 
shift, or repli- 
cate individual 
columns of 
text. An in- 
depth review 
wilt appear in 
a future issue 
of Ahoy! 
READER 
SERVICE 
NO. 133 




dard Commodore screen editor keys and functions. 
A command line at the lop of the screen lets you 
know what function or mode you are working in. 
This line is also used by the system to display any 
prompts for additional information as well as DOS 
error messages. Automatic word wraparound feature 
is also available. 

PaperClip offers a special feature that allows you 
to manipulate columns of text. This is useful for 
businesses preparing budgets and financial reports. 
Columns may be individually moved, deleted, insert- 
ed, shifted, and replicated. Files may be saved in the 
actual screen format or the Pet ASCII format, which 
allows exchange of information between programs. 
This format is useful for interlacing your text files 
with other programs (databases, spreadsheets, etc.), 
PaperClip allows you to use alternate character sets 
for multilingual applications. Control codes may be 
sent to the printer for accessing special print func- 
tions. Definitely one of the best word processors 
available for the C-64. 

Batteries Included. 3303 Harbor Blvd., Suite C-9. 
Costa Messa, CA 92626 (phone: 714-979-0920). 

QUICK BROWN FOX 

Quick Brown Fox; cartridge, $65.00 

This menu-driven program requires no printer set- 
up and may be used with a number of 80-column 
adaptors. The edit function is limited to downward 
movement and full screen text editing and entering 
features are not provided. Text is edited one line at a 
time. Many standard edit functions are available, al- 
though their implementation is primitive. DOS func- 
tions may be accessed via the clerk menu. Mail 
merge facility is also available lor creating personal- 
ized form letters. An advanced file handling feature 
of the program is the use of boiler-plating, similar to 
merging contents of a text file at specific locations in 
another file. The program is very user friendly, and 
easy to use for the novice. It is not recommended 
for advanced users. 

Quick Brown Fox, 548 Broadway, New York, NY 
10012. 

SCRIPT 64 

Richvale Telecommunications; diskette, $99.95 

This word processor features 40/80 column display 
without the use of any additional hardware. Limited 
DOS functions are available, so it is recommended 
that you format your diskettes and configure your 
printer before you execute this program. Text may be 
entered one screen at a time. Function keys may be 
used to access the next screen. Automatic word 



14 JTrTUY! 



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wraparound and numeric mode functions arc also 
available. Full use of the Commodore 64's cursor 
control and editing keys is made during the text en- 
tering and editing modes. 

Text data is saved in the form of screens. You are 
allowed up to 40 screens per file and 999 screens on 
a disk. Global search and replace options allow you 
to search the whole text for a text string and replace 
it. Printing is done on selected screens in any se- 
quence. The most outstanding feature of Script 64 is 
the dictionary provided with it. The 80-column dis- 
play is poor, unreadable, and not very useful. 

Richvale Telecommunications, 10610 Bayview, 
Richmond Hill. Ontario, Canada, L4C 3N8 (phone: 
416-884-4165), 

SM1THWRITER 

Softsmith Software; diskette, $59.95 

This program does not support DOS functions. A 
separate configurator program adapts the word pro- 
cessor to your particular printer. Text entering is 
done through the window in the center of the screen 
which can hold up to 66 characters. An option is 
available to change this character limit. Full editing 
features are implemented in this window and lines of 
text have to be moved into the window for editing. 
Editing functions such as delete, insert, etc. are 
available, although poorly implemented. The "'push" 
and "pull" features allow you to move words, phras- 
es, or lines in the file. You can use the rearrange 
text option to perform block moves. Text may be 
sent to the disk, tape, or the printer. The unique fea- 
ture of this program is its ability to print text in 
more than one column. Good for novice users. 

Softsmith, Inc., 2935 Whipple Road, Union City, 
CA 94587 (phone: 800-341-4000). 

TOTL. TEXT 

Toil Software; diskette, $44.00 

This is an easy-to-use program written in BASIC 
(and therefore considerably slower than comparable 
word processors). It is menu-driven and supports 
both disk and tape. Text is entered in blocks of 255 
characters. Each block is treated as a screen, and 
function keys are used to move up or down the 
block to enter and edit text The most recent ver- 
sion includes the facility to use two disk drives, a 
feature that increases the processing speed of saving 
and loading files. Files may be concatenated and 
printed in a link format. A short machine language 
program (Chickspeed) is provided to speed up the 
disk access. The print function is well developed and 
allows you to send special control codes to the print- 




Features true word wraparound and audio feedback. 
READER SERVICE NO. 134 

er to access special print functions and commands 
available with your printer. 

TOTL Software. Inc., 1555 Third Ave., Walnut 
Creek, CA 94596 (phone: 415-943-7877). 

WORD PROCESSOR, 
PROFESSIONAL VERSION 

Mirage Concepts; diskette, $99.95 

This easy-to-use, menu-driven word processor has 
a 40/80 column selectable display format. Prior to 
text entering and editing, the program asks you to 
specify a few parameters such as lines per page, 
characters per line, etc. True word wraparound and 
audio-feedback are the available special features. The 
edit line is at the center of the screen where all the 
edit operations occur. In order to perform edit on 
any line of text, therefore, the line has to be moved 
into that window. Replace and insert modes are pro- 
vided to facilitate editing. Block operations may also 
be performed by manipulating selected blocks of text 
or data. Blocks may also be saved individually, as 
compared to the whole file. Print format parameters 
may be selected from the menu. The 80-column dis- 
play has poor resolution, and is a disappointing fea- 
ture. (See full-length review in August Ahoy!) 

Mirage Concepts, Inc.. 2519 W. Shaw #106, 
Fresno. CA 93711 (phone: 209-227-8369). 

WORDPR03 PLUS/64 

Professional Software; diskette, $89.95 

This is an excellent, full featured word processor. 

AHOY! 15 



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m mm m m mmmmmm mm * m*m m* 



It allows up to 352 lines of text in two screens; 
each one may be selected for the number of lines. 
This means that you can work on two separate 
documents, and by using control keys switch back 
and forth between screens. The alternate screen may 
also be used to display disk directory or mailing 
labels for creating form letters. Text may also be 
transferred between screens. Edit commands are 
available via the control keys. A command line on 
top of the screen notes the function or mode cur- 
rently in use. This line also displays system prompts 
for additional input from you as well as DOS error 
messages. Full editing capabilities are available in 
the text entering and editing mode. Printer con- 
figuration is available in the initial start-up options. 
Special control codes may be sent to the printer for 
accessing special functions. 

Professional Software, Inc., 51 Fremont Street, 
Needham, MA 02194 (phone: 617-444-5224). 



WRITER'S ASSISTANT 

Rainbow Computer Corp; diskette, $125.00 

This menu-driven program is easy to use and in- 
corporates many standard features. It is, however, 
slow and not recommended for fast typists. Printer 
set up and screen colors are accessed from the 
menu. A disk utility option allows access to DOS 
functions. Text is entered free form on the screen. 
Automatic word wraparound feature is also provid- 
ed. Up to 356 lines of text may be entered before 
saving it on a disk. Small files may be concatenated 
on disk to create longer documents. Text may be 
formatted for printing by using embedded com- 
mands. The program offers most standard print for- 
mats and functions. 

Rainbow Computer Corp. , 490 Lancaster Ave. , 
Frazer, PA 19355 (phone: 215-296-3474). 



w * i .m.ijmmninmw i Wj ii ik nmn>M i iin^i»ni< » 



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u mmmm — i n 1 1 



$39 



"The Rabbit" 

for your VIC 20 or CBM 64 

If you own a VIC 20 or a CBM 64 and hove been 
concerned about the high cost ot a disk to store 
your programs on . . worry yourself no longer Now 
there's the RABBIT The RABBIT comes in a cartridge, 
and at a much, much lower price than the aver- 
age disk. And speed . . this is one fast RABBIT. 
With the RABBIT you con load and store on your 
CBM datasette an 8K program in almost 30 
seconds, compared to the current 3 minutes of 
a VIC 20 or CBM 64. almost as fast as the 1541 
disk drive. 

The RABBIT is easy to install, allows one to Append 
Basic Programs, works with or without Expansion Memory, 
and provides two data file modes. The RABBIT is not only fast but 
(The Rabbit for the VIC 20 contains an expansion connector 
can simultaneously use your memory board, etc) 




reliable, 
so you 



111 ^" NOW Please tor your own protection 

It || m\ ^_ tue dcct consider the MAE first before you 

■ \# I M r I " C _°. C .?' buy that other assembler We've 

If II m^B FOR LESS! had numerous customers who 

wasted their money on some cheaper ott brand assembler tell us 

how much better the MAE is. 

The most powerful Macro Assembler/Editor available for the 

Commodore. 64 and other CBM/PET computers, and also for the 

ATARI 800 XL and Apple IIMIE. 

MAE includes an Assembler, Editor, Word Processor, Relocating 

Loader, and more all for just S59.9S. 

We could goon and describe the MAE but we thought you would 

like to read our customers' comments. The following are actual 

unedited comments from correspondence about the MAE: 

"Excellent Development "My Compliments lo Carl 

Package" Moser and EHS" 

"Compares to DEC and INTEL." "It is a superb program." 



TELSTAR 64 - "A Star is Born" 

Sophisticated Terminal Communications Cartridge 
tor the 64. 

•PFO' 10D00DCPD1 D2BELL 12:30:00 10:14:36 

(TELSTAR's Status Line) 
Don't settle for less than the best' 

• Upload/Download to/from disk or tape. Menu-driven 

• Automatic File Translation. Real Time Clock plus 
Alarm Clock. 

• Communicates in Industry Standard ASCII 

■ Line editing capability allows correcting and 
resending long command lines. 

■ ° Quick Read Functions. 

• Similar to our famous STCP Terminal package. 

• Works with Commodore Modems and supports 
auto-dialing. 

Thebestfeature is the price — only $49. 95 (Cartridge 
and Manual) 



Machine Language 
Monitor Cartridge 

for the CBM 64 

More than 20 commands allow you to access the 
CBM 64's Microprocessors Registers and Memory 
Contents. Commands include assemble, disassemble, 
registers, memory, transfer, compare, plus many more. 
Someday every CBM 64 owner will need a monitor 
such as this. 
Cartridge and Manual — $24,95 



3239 Linda Dr. 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 27106 
(919)748-8446 
Send for free catalog! 



a«»r S-ervce No. 18b 



16 AHOY! 



CRIEATINGYOUROWN GAMISS 
ON 71-11= VIC AND 64 

Adventures 

Ob 

Wonderland 



I"~' played my first adventure game 
in a computer store in Salt Lake 
City. It was a version of the 
granddaddy of all text adventures, 
called, appropriately enough, Adventure. 
In an hour I got lost in a forest, pried 
open a grid leading down into a cavern, 
and made my way through the tunnels 
to a large open chamber with smaller 
rooms all around, a deep chasm at one 
end, and a stairway down to another 
room where a huge snake waited to 
swallow me whole. 

I also died five times, but that's the 
nice thing about computer adventures. 
Type RUN and you can live again! 



By Orson Scott Card 

Any place 

you can Imagine, 

any adventure 

you can dream of 



WORDS TELL THE STORY 

Computer adventures began with words— and nothing 
but words. You don't actually see the cave you're explor- 
ing on the screen in front of you. Instead, you read de- 
scriptions of each room you enter. Also, instead of a joy- 
stick, you move around with more words. 

Let's play a sample game. The words the player types 
into the computer will be in ITALICS; the computer's 
words will LOOK THIS THIS. This game is called Sky 
Scraper, but don't look for it in your nearest computer 
store. I'm making it up as I go along. 

The packaging of the game says that you're a nearly 
bankrupt private investigator who just got a $5,000 re- 
tainer to find out some information about GAK, a major 
computer firm, which is doing some vital research in 
the Wellman building, a skyscraper in Manhattan. At the 



beginning of the game, you are in the 
foyer of the Wellman building. 
FOYER 

YOU'RE STANDING IN THE 
CROWDED FOYER OF AN OFFICE 
BUILDING. PEOPLE ARE WALK- 
ING QUICKLY ALL AROUND YOU, 

you can program heading into a bank to the 

WEST, A SMALL SHOPPING MALL 
TO THE EAST, OR THE ELEVATOR 
LOBBY TO THE NORTH. THERE'S 
AN INFORMATION BOOK RIGHT 
BY YOU, BUT THERE'S NOBODY 
THERE. 
LOOK BOOTH 

THERE ARE BROCHURES IN A 
RACK ON THE COUNTER AND A 
SMALL BELL TO SUMMON HELP. 
IN A HALF-OPEN DRAWER BEHIND THE COUNT- 
ER YOU CAN SEE SOMETHING SHINING. 
RING BELL 
DING. 

(That was exciting. Well, I'm an investigator— better 
start snooping.) 
OPEN DRAWER. 
THE DRAWER IS NOW OPEN 
LOOK DRAWER 

IN THE DRAWER YOU CAN SEE A LETTER OP- 
ENER, A RING OF KEYS, A FLASHLIGHT, AND 
A PAPER BAG THAT LOOKS LIKE SOMEBODY'S 
LUNCH. 
(These sound pretty useful — better take them along.) 



an adventure 
game that brings 
the dream to life. 
First of two parts. 



TAKE ALL 



AHOY! 17 



TAKEN 

INVENTORY 

YOU HAVE THE FOLLOWING ITEMS: 

LETTER OPENER 

KEYS 

FLASHLIGHT 

LUNCHBAG 

BROCHURE 

BELL 

(I got more than I bargained for — I meant to take 
only the items in the drawer. But as long as I've got 
a brochure, I might as well see what it is.) 
READ BROCHURE 

"WELCOME TO THE WELLMAN BUILDING. 
THIS HISTORIC STRUCTURE WAS BEGUN IN 
1929. AND THE BASIC CONSTRUCTION WAS 
FINISHED BY MID-1930. HOWEVER, THE 
GREAT DEPRESSION DRIED UP THE FUNDS 
FOR COMPLETION. AND THE BUILDING 
STOOD UNOCCUPIED, EXCEPT FOR A FEW 
TENANTS ON THE LOWER FLOORS, FOR 11 
YEARS, WHEN AMERICA ENTERED WORLD 
WAR II. AT THAT TIME THE NAVY USED SEV- 
ERAL FLOORS FOR WEAPONS RESEARCH 
AND DEVELOPMENT, WHILE ANOTHER 
FLOOR WAS USED FOR THE CITY'S INDUS- 
TRIAL MOBILIZATION EFFORT. AFTER THE 
WAR, THESE FLOORS CONTINUED TO BE 
LEASED BY THE GOVERNMENT, THOUGH 
THEY WERE LOCKED UP AND NEVER USED. 
MOST OF THE BUILDING WAS NEVER OCCU- 
PIED. AND ITS OWNER MADE NO EFFORT TO 
LEASE THE SPACE. 

RECENTLY. THE OWNER CONTRACTED WITH 
EG. IVUUPO TO RENOVATE AND LEASE 
MOST OF THE PROPERTY THE RESULT IS 
THE ATTRACTIVE WELLMAN MALL, WITH 
DOZENS OF INTERESTING SHOPS AND RES- 
TAURANTS; THE WELLMAN BRANCH OF 
CITYWIDE BANK; AND 37 FLOORS OF OFFIC^ 
ES TO OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC. 

(On the off chance that there's more information, 
I'll read again.) 
READ BROCHURE 

THE WELLMAN BUILDING IS A FINE OLD 
SKYSCRAPER ON THE OUTSIDE, A PLUSH 
MODERN OFFICE BUILDING ON THE INSIDE. 
THE BUILDING IS 644 FEET FROM STREET 
LEVEL TO ROOFTOP. EACH FLOOR WAS ORI- 
GINALLY 14 FEET FROM THE FLOORS ABOVE 
AND BELOW, BUT FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY 
ALL THE CEILINGS HAVE BEEN DROPPED TO 
A MORE STANDARD, BUT STILL SPACIOUS, 9 

18 AHOY! 



FEET ABOVE THE FLOOR, ALLOWING THE 
INSTALLATION OF STATE-OFTHE-ART SOLAR 
HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT. 
WE HOPE YOU WILL ENJOY YOUR VISIT TO 
THE WELLMAN BUILDING. IF YOU HAVE 
ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE ASK ONE OF OUR 
COURTEOUS GUIDES IN THE INFORMATION 
BOOTH. 

(Ah. There was more. And all these figures might 
add up to something. Let's see. each floor is 14 feet 
high; the building is 644 feet high; that means there 
could be as many as 46 floors. Even allowing for a 



KORKS'I 



I 



' 



■ 



r 



MAIN 
GATE 



MKADOW 



: " •.-:■■ U-vrKHDi. sfT :■: --.-M--:-'.-- 



COUHTYAKI) 




FLOOR PLAN 

Layout of the Castle of Darkness (see later pages). 

foyer twice the normal height, that still means that 
with "37 floors of offices open to the general pub- 
lic," there might be a few floors not open to the 
general public Also, there is a crawl space between 
the original ceiling and the new lowered ceiling on 
every floor— that might come in handy sometime.) 

(Now, do we try the bank, the shops, or the eleva- 
tors?) 

GO WEST 

THERE IS A MAN LOCKING THE BANK DOOR. 
HE FROWNS AT YOU AND SAYS, "THE BANK 
IS CLOSING." 

(Sometimes in adventure games it pays to try more 
than once.) 
GO WEST 

THE MAN SAYS, "COME BACK IN THE MORN- 
ING." 

(Well, persistence does make a difference. Let's 
try it again.) 



GO WEST 

THE MAN BECKONS TO THE SECURITY 
GUARD, WHO STARTS TOWARD YOU, HIS 
HAND ON HIS GUN. 

(This doesn't look 2ood. Let's go somewhere else.) 
GO NORTH 
ELEVATOR LOBBY 

THE ELEVATORS ON THE WEST SIDE GO TO 
FLOORS 2-21: THOSE ON THE EAST SIDE ARE 
EXPRESS TO FLOORS 2140. AT THE NORTH 
END OF THE LOBBY ARE TWO MORE ELEVA- 
TORS: A SERVICE ELEVATOR AND ONE WITH 




Cutaway view of castle (including tower and dungeon). 



NO SIGN AT ALL. BOTH OF THESE REQUIRE 
A KEY. 

(Most adventure games let you use a single letter 
for the major directions N. S. E. and W.) 
N 

IT TAKES A KEY TO USE THESE ELEVATORS. 
WHICH KEY WOULD YOU LIKE TO TRY? 

(How do I know which kev? Foruet it for now.) 
E 

THE ELEVATOR HAS BUTTONS FOR THE FOL- 
LOWING FLOORS: PI P2 P3 P4 B L 20 21 22 23 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 33 34 35 36 37. WHICH 
BUTTON WILL YOU PUSH.' 

(Aha! Notice that there are four parking levels and 
a basement Also notice that there is no button for 
24 and no button for 32. But the game doesn't point 
this out— you're a private investigator. You have to 
notice these details for yourself. They may be im- 
portant: they may not.) 



24 

THERE IS NO BUTTON 24. 

(OK, I was trying to be cute. I'll push a real but- 
ton now.) 
37 

THE ELEVATOR SOARS UPWARD AT AN 
ALARMING SPEED. 

THE DOORS OPEN INTO THE RECEPTION 
AREA OF "GAK COMMERCIAL ACCOUNTS". 

There are many possibilities from here on. Many 
floors are probably ringers — nothing can happen 
there except that you get in trouble or waste time. 
But the service elevator, the missing floors, the un- 
identified elevator, the crawl spaces, the shops in the 
mall, the bank, the parking levels— there's a lot of 
space to be explored in this building. The encounter 
with the man at the door of the bank suggests that 
there are also risks. There might be unfinished 
floors; you might find the floors that have been 
sealed off since the Navy research in World War II: 
you might find some very odd secrets indeed. 

Other adventure games provide other opportuni- 
ties. Treasure islands, underground empires, space 
stations, murder mysteries, haunted houses— if you 
can imagine a place, you can put an adventure in it. 

WHAT ARE SOME GOOD 
ADVENTURE GAMES? 

Perhaps the most popular of all adventure games 
is Infocom's three-part (so far) ZORK series. I have 
played only ZORK I to exhaustion, but I can assure 
you that its popularity is well deserved. Infocom 
specializes in text-only adventures— games that use 
nothing but words— and they are all excellent, partly 
because of the best parsing routines in any adventure 
games. 

That deserves a bit of explanation, because you're 
going to face the problem of parsing in the adven- 
ture games you program. Parsing is the process of 
taking the instructions the player types into the com- 
puter and interpreting them, When the instruction is 
as simple as N for north, it's easy enough. Most ad- 
venture games allow you to use only two-word com- 
mands, beginning with a verb and ending with a 
noun or adverb: 
GO NORTH 
TAKE KNIFE 
DROP LAMP 
KILL DWARF 
OPEN DOOR 
LIGHT LAMP 

Parsing these simple commands is hard enough. 
The program has to cut the command string into the 

AHOY! 19 



two parts, then decide whether it is a legal word and 
act on it. This is done by searching a table. 

TABLES AND SEARCHES 

A table is a list in a deliberate order, stored in 
memory. You conduct a search by examining all the 
legal command words in the list until you find a 
match with the word the player typed, or find that 
none of the words match. 

The command word table would include all the le- 
gal verbs and all the legal one-word commands: N S 
E W NE SE NW SW GO TAKE LOOK DROP 
KILL OPEN LIGHT. . .CLIMB. In a BASIC pro- 
gram, you would put each of these command words 
in a string array, so that CWS(O) would be "N", 
CWS(9) would be TAKE, and CW$(22) might be 
CLIMB. 

But it isn't enough to list the words in the table. 
They have to be listed in a useful order. That's be- 
cause each table is related to other tables, which will 
be in a related order. So the table gives us two items 
of information: not only the name of the command, 
but also its position in the table. "N" is therefore 
command 0; "TAKE" is command 9; and 
"CLIMB" is command 22. because each comes in 
that order in the table. 

Let's say the player has typed CLIMB WALL. That 
was INPUT into the string PIS. Then it was cut into 
two words, PIS and P2$. Now we want to see if PIS, 
the first word, matches any of the commands in the 
table CWS(n). This subroutine would carry out the 
search: 

500 CM=23:FOR 1=0 TO 22: IF P1S=CW 
$(I) THEN CM=I:I=23 
510 NEXT:RETURN 

The routine is simple. CM, the command code, is 
set to 23. Then PIS is compared to each entry in the 
CWS array. If there is a match. CM is set to the 
number of the command (its order in the table, re- 
member), and / is set to 23 so the loop will end im- 
mediately. If no match is found, then when the loop 
ends, CM will still have the value of 23. 

JUMP TABLES 

New that we know which command the player has 
called for. we go to another table— a jump table. 
Each command is carried out by a particular subrou- 
tine in the program. We get to the right subroutine 
by using a simple jump table, like the one in this 
statement: 

ON CM+1 GOSUB 250,550,1000,1100,1 



200 , 600 ,650 , 670 , 900 ... 2500 , 200 

The value of CM, which represents the position of 
the command word in the command table, is also 
the position in the jump table of the line number of 
the routine that executes that command. Since 
CLIMB was command word 22, then it will be exe- 
cuted when the program jumps to the 22nd line 
number folowing the GOSUB statement. 

Notice that even though there arc 22 commands, 
there must be 23 line numbers after the GOSUB. 
That's because CM might have the value of 23, 
which would happen when the player did not enter a 
valid command. That will send it to line 200: 

200 PRINT "I DON'T KNOW HOW TO "P 
1$:RETURN 

That error message shows the player what he 
typed by printing PIS. so the player can sec any typ- 
ing errors. It also tells the player that the computer 
is expecting a verb. 

(Notice also that the sample command said ON 
CM + 1. That's because CM has a possible value of 
zero in our example, and an ON n GOSUB com- 
mand won't respond to a zero. The solution is either 
to make it impossible tor a command to be or add 
one to the number.) 

Parsing has only begun, however, when the com- 
mand has been recognized. Then the second word, if 
there is one, has to be analyzed, and an Object Ta- 
ble searched to see if it is a valid object name for 
that command (you obviously can't TAKE NORTH, 
though you can GO NORTH; you can't DROP 
WALL, though you might be able to CLIMB WALL), 
Then the Object Location Table must be searched to 
see if the object is present or in the player's posses- 
sion. And so on and so on. 

Most of the programming activity in an adventure 
game involves table searches and table jumps. 

And that's why Infoconi's parser is so remarkable. 
Instead of two-word commands, it is quite possible 
in an Infocom game to type a command like this: 

KILL THE TROLL WITH THE SWORD, 
TAKE THE AX, GO EAST AND REST 

This is starting to sound like English, isn't it'.' 
Yet, in my opinion, the parser, good as it is, isn't 
the main value of the Infocom games. The best thing 
about them is that they are good stories. 

That's one of the curious things about adventures 
—they have a lot in common with games, it's true. 

Continued on page 42 



20 AHOY! 




ii=i(o 




(Bdb 
[LD®[?©0 



For all you beginning pro- 
grammers who can't quite get 
a handle on all those Disk Oper- 
ating System commands and all 

you more experienced programmers who, like 
myself, don't like the wedge, I've created DOS, 
DOS incorporates all the normal disk commands used 
by a programmer and reduces them to one keystroke from 
a main menu, making your life that much easier. It also 
includes a HELP screen and a disk directory which will 
display and run any program on that disk with one stroke 
of a finger. 

After typing in the program, save a copy to disk or 
tape in case of any typing error, then type "RUN" and 
you'll get a brief look at the title screen. Once this is 
done, the main menu will appear and you will have a 
choice of seven options: FORMAT DISK, RENAME 
FILE. VALIDATE DISK, ERASE PRG, WRITE DOS 
FILES. DIRECTORY and HELP SCREEN. 




At this point let me 
strongly suggest you go 
straight to the HELP 
SCREEN. This will explain 
all your other options. Prompts 
have been used when necessary 
in order to make the program easi- 
er for the beginner to use. 
After I completed the program, a 
friend of mine just getting started 
with his C-64 came to me asking for 
help with the disk commands. I gave him a 
copy of DOS. The next day he couldn't thank me enough 
and praised the program. It felt great to know I helped 
another person, and I hope I can do the same for you. 
Put a copy on all your disks with option #5 so it will 
be handy when you need it. One more point: because 
of its name, you will not see it listed on the directory, 
but be assured it's there waiting to work for you. 

If you don't wish to type in the program, send $5.00 
and a self-addressed, stamped envelope to Robert Lloret, 
157 Atlantic Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10304 and a copy 
will promptly be mailed to you. Don't forget to specify 
disk or cassette! 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 82 

AHOY! 21 



,□ o 



Pj-^j he war had been raging for several years, 
each side winning and losing battle after 
bloody battle. Now the rebels were ad- 
J vancing on the royal palace itself! In des- 
peration the King orders that all the palace treasure 
be loaded aboard his newest ship, the S.S. Marie, to 
be transported to safety across the sea. The treasure 
loaded, the 5.5, Marie slips from her berth and dis- 
appears into the mists, never to be seen again. 

Was she attacked by the enemy, only to be looted 
and sunk? Or did she go down in one of the many 
violent storms so common in those waters? For 
many years rumors abounded. Tales of the fabulous 
jade throne being part of a private collection in 
Spain. Gold and silver bars with the royal seal being 
traded behind closed doors. But never any real 
proof, only rumors. Finally, in a dusty attic in the 
midwest United States, deep in a forgotten trunk, a 
book is found: the log of the S.S. Mariel 

Now with her position known, it becomes a race 
to riches. You don't have much time before the 
world finds out. Putting together a ragged three-man 
crew you race to her grave. Your objective: get the 
treasure! 



w 



©*"•" 



fUS"" 1 





I 




«. 



V 



(Note: Any program can bomb if lines are entered 
incorrectly. Those programs using machine language 
subroutines are especially vulnerable to crashes. 
Since many Commodore 64's automatically run pro- 
grams when they are loaded, I have included a stop 
command in line #1. This way, if the program 
crashes when you run it, you can reload it without it 
automatically crashing again. To run the program af- 
ter loading, simply type RUN2 or type RUN and 
then CONT after the break in 1 message.) 

When the game begins you start with 3 divers, 
each with a full tank of air. Controlling the diver 
with a joystick in Port 2, you must dive to the ocean 



floor and find the X-marked treasures, all the time 
avoiding the hungry sharks. When your diver grabs a 
treasure, it will be immediately identified and its val- 
ue will be displayed and added to the diver's total. 
The longer the diver stays down the lower his air 
supply gets and the faster the sharks move. When 
the air gauge turns yellow your air is getting low. 
When the gauge is red you are on your reserve sup- 
ply. If your air gets below 100 lbs., the diver will 
move slower due to low oxygen. If you run out of 
air the diver will drown and all his treasure will be 
lost. If the diver completes his dive and returns to 
the surface the value of his treasure is added to the 
net total and a new diver swims out to take his 
place. Any time a shark contacts a treasure he will 
swallow it and a new treasure will be marked. 

If you would like a copy of this or any of my pro- 
grams on cassette only, send a blank tape and a self 
addressed stamped mailer along with $5.00 and the 
program name to: 

B.W. Behling 
232 Jackson Street 
Brooklyn, NY 11211 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 84 



i 








>V 



>:> 









HAS EVERYTHING! 

r sFBSCRIBE TO AHOVT 

D Twelve Issues for $19.95 ($26.95 Canada and elsewhere) 

3 Twenty-four Issues for $37.95 ($49.95 Canada and elsewhere) 

Name 



Address. 
City 



State 



Zip. 



Send coupon or facsimile to: 

ION INTERNATIONAL INC. 

45 West 34th Street, Room 407, New York, NY 10001 

L —————— ————J 



I don't really hate to write letters, but it seems like I'm always behind in 
my correspondence. For example, at least half the Christmas cards that 
should be sent to my far-flung relatives never are. But thanks to my 
Commodore 64 I not only sent out all my cards last Christmas, I also 
enclosed a personalized letter in each card. My aunt in Florida loved it. 
My mother loved it too, because for once she didn't have to make ex- 
cuses for her tardy son. 

Letter writing like this is an obvious use for a word processor. Run a 
copy of the letter on the printer, change the greeting, run another copy 
and so on. A 'mail merge' program will even address the envelopes. 

However, the more you use a word processor the more not-so-obvious 
applications you discover for it — some trivial, some not so trivial. Here, 
culled from my personal experience, are 



TEn USES FDR VDUR 
WDRD PROCESSOR 

BY ED HOORNAERT 



i. 



E. 



Make your own stationery. 

People like to have their possessions personal- 
ized—witness automobile license plates and T-shirts 
with names on them. Personalized stationery is use- 
ful, too, but expensive. Besides, you usually have to 
buy about 500 sheets at a time! 

Computers, however, are ideal for this sort of 
task. Set up the letterhead you want on the screen. 
If your printer does fancy printing— bold face, ital- 
ics, subscripts, double size letters or the like— ex- 
periment till you get a distinctive result. Then use 
the word processor's editing capabilities to make 
sure it's perfect. Use your imagination! 

Most word processing programs let you print 
more than one copy. Set it to 25 or 50 copies, feed 
in individual sheets of quality paper and you're all 
ready to catch up on your correspondence. 



Keep your addiess book up to date. 

People move around a lot these days. My address 
book always used to be filled with addresses 
scratched out and scribbled in. Worse yet, I some- 
times had no idea which of two or three addresses 
was the right one. 

A computer makes updating such records a snap. 
The first time around you'll have a bit of typing, 
but if you save the list on a disk or tape you'll nev- 
er have to do the whole thing again. When you 
have a sufficient number of new friends or new ad- 
dresses, load your file. If your word processor has 
a 'search' function, use it to find the name of your 
peripatetic friends. Simply type the new address 
and phone number over the old, then sit back and 
watch your printer do the rest of the work. 

AHOY! 25 



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3. Keep track of collections. 

Do you collect records? Baseball cards'? Maybe 
plates are your thing. A word processor can help 
you organize and keep track of any kind of collect- 
ion, from antiques to zippers. 

For example, you might start a word processing 
file called Classical Records. You could label the 
first section "Beethoven" and then list all his 
music — along with orchestras, conductors, and rec- 
ord labels if you wish. Then do the same with 
Brahms, Britten, and so forth. To add a symphony 
by Gustav Mahler, use the search function to find 
"Mahler" and insert the information in the proper 
place. In effect, you can use your word processor as 
a mini-database! 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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4. Keep insurance files. 

Have you memorized the serial number of your 
computer? I haven't. I'm not even sure where to 
find it. (I just checked. It's on the bottom of my 
Commodore— P00221493.) Yet if your home is 
robbed or burned, the police and insurance agency 
might want that number, as well as a detailed list of 
other valuables in each room. 

Once again, your word processor makes the chore 
easier. The hardest part is figuring out all that you 
have and collecting serial numbers. When you're 
done typing your list make sure that you save it on 
a tape or disk, because you'll need to revise it peri- 
odically. But don't worry about that. Changing or 
adding to a list is easy 

One last suggestion about your insurance list. 
Keep it in a safe, place, but not in your home. The 
ashes of the list wouldn't help you a bit. 



i i_i_i_i_i_i 




5. Write more effective resumes. 

Once upon a time, many people stayed at the 
same job their whole lives. Not anymore. And if 
you're the one changing jobs the computer can help 
you write a more effective resume. 

A resume is like an ad. The product advertised is 

26 AHOY! 



you — your skills and experience. With a word pro- 
cessor, it's easy to change the basic format of a 
resume, stored on a disk, to highlight your suitabili- 
ty for a particular job. A tailor-made resume, pref- 
erably run out on a letter-quality printer, presents 
you in the best possible light for each job opening. 

Imagine, for example, that you want to be a staff 
programmer for a software publisher. One company 
produces game software for young children, so you 
would load your "basic resume" from disk and add 
specifics about your experience with youngsters. A 
second company, however, produces business soft- 
ware. The resume sent to them would discuss in de- 
tail your business background. 

Maybe you'll owe your next job to your computer. 



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1 0~uj_O CO i '"ff^w '""' ' ' Ojjjjj~0~ 

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i i i i i i i i i i fi ,- wMpViflri i i i i i i i i i 



6. Make your opinions count. 

Lots of people say they don't care about politics. 
But they still have opinions about political issues — 
maybe disarmament, or the construction of a new 
factory near home. If you're like me. though, you 
rarely get around to writing the letter to a newspap- 
er or elected representative that might help your 
cause. 

A word processor, however, can be even more ef- 
fective than your vote in influencing public policy. 
A letter can be personalized and sent to several 
newspapers and public officials. With almost no ex- 
tra effort, your opinions spread farther— and carry 
more weight. 



I_l l_l I I I I I I t I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I 

i n i • i i i _ i i i"i~i"i ~i~i~i~ i~i~i~i"i~i"i~i~i~i~i~i~i~i~i~i 
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i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 
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7. Stand up to the big guys. 

Sometimes a letter to a politician isn't enough. 
And at these times your word processor will help 
even the odds between you and the 'big guys.' 

Richard Bach, author of the bestselling Jonathan 
Livingston Seagull, moved to a quiet valley in 
Oregon only to find that logging companies were 
going to denude the hillsides. Bach and a group of 
neighbors researched legal objections to the logging. 
Using database programs and a word processor, 
they produced a 600-page protest that forced the 
withdrawal of the timber sale. 

Furthermore, the protest was easily adapted to 
fight other controversial timber sales, putting the 
private citizens on a more equal footing with big 



business and government agencies. The bulk of the 
work needed to be done just once, thanks to word 
processing. 



8. Write a painless newsletter. 

It seems like every group sends out a newslet- 
ter—schools, computer users groups, clubs, busines- 
ses—and usually a reluctant volunteer is saddled 
with the chore. A word processor makes a profes- 
sional-looking newsletter as easy as typing 200 
words a minute (on your printer, of course). 

The computer lets you catch and correct mistakes 
on the screen, rather than on paper. Even hunt and 
peck typists can produce a perfect copy. So why not 
volunteer? Who knows, you may be tempted to pro- 
duce a newsletter just to show off your word 
processor! 



i i i i i i i i 



Trri"fi"i r 



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j_i_i_ij_ijj_i~i_ijj~ijjjjjj 



9. Help your kids get ahead in school. 

My eight year old son has a homework assign- 
ment to write about the ways computers can be 
used. He wants to use the word processor to get a 
finished copy that looks far better than he can do 
by hand. Even kids want their work to look great. 

Furthermore, your children will be learning valu- 
able lessons in computer applications. Word proces- 
sing will be an important skill in their lifetime. 

And once they learn the keyboard and how to ed- 
it, an added bonus may come about. The computer 
removes the physical blocks to making changes and 
improvements. If they wish to add a sentence in the 
middle of an essay, for example, they don't have to 
recopy the whole thing. Thus they may become 
more willing to go back and improve their work. 
Word processing can be a boon even to young com- 
puter users. 



I !■"! I I I l_l Q_l Q Fl 
~l~lM"l I 1 |~| l~l I I I |~| I 



10. Unleash your creativity. 

What works for kids works for adults, too. As 
you become comfortable with word processing you. 



too, will be more willing to change and improve 
your writing. Furthermore, the printer does such a 
neat, professional job that you'll marvel that you 
really wrote the piece. 

So, do some writing of your own — maybe a short 
story, or a diary, or a poem, or a magazine article. 
What the heck, why not try a book? Sec if your 
word processor's easy correctability can break down 
your inhibitions, born of laborious recopying in 
school. Be creative! 



It's true. Your Commodore can help 
you be creative. And an example of 
that creativity just might be the new 
uses that you develop for that won- 
derful tool of the computer age — 
your word processor. 



Morton Kevelson's analyses of the 1541 and 
MSD SD-2 disk drives have become indus- 
try standards. And in the October and 
November issues of Ahoy! he provides the 
same expansive coverage of an even more 
expansive subject: graphics on the Commodore 
64. Included will be articles on bit map and 
character graphics, reviews of available programs, 
and original graphics routines. 



ATTENTION COMMODORE 64 OWNERS: 
"Is THE CLONE MACHINE really dead?" 
Yes. there comes a lime when a product grows old and isn't the 
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Reader Service No. 165 



AHOY! 27 



COMMODORE 64* 



Bo Jlie BE WINE 



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Rudw Swvlca No. 193 




Unraveling 

the 

Mysteries 

of 

OOUnCt ontheC-64 



Partz 
Sound Explorer 

by David Barron 



L~~ ast month I spoke of 
the various parameters 
that control electronical- 
ly synthesized sound on 

the Commodore 64. This month I 
present Sound Explorer, a pro- 
gram that will let you play around 
with the three oscillators in the 
64. 

Each oscillator has the capabili- 
ty of producing one of four wave- 
forms: 

1) Noise: a random waveform 
that can be used for gunshots or 
crowds cheering. 

2) Pulse: Basically a square 
wave with an adjustable "duty cy- 
cle." The duty cycle refers to the 
width of the squares. The width is 
adjustable by "Pulse width." (This 
control will only work when the 
waveform is set on "Pulse") 

3) Sawtooth: this waveform pro- 
duces a very raspy sound that 
may prove quite useful. 

4) Triangle: a very mellow 
waveform. 

Full control of the envelope is 
provided via ADSR parameters. In 
all cases, 15 represents the slowest 
value and the fastest (attack, de- 
cay, release). To control sustain, 
15 is the loudest value and is 
the lowest 

The "ON = r parameter deter- 
mines whether the oscillator is 
turned on or not. A "1" means it 
will be on and a "0" means that 
it is off. 

Bandpass, lowpass, and high- 
pass filters are provided. The cut- 
off frequencies of these filters 
may be varied by using the "Cut- 
off Low" and "Cutoff High" par- 
ameters. 

The general operation of the 
program is quite simple Once the 
program is loaded and run, all the 
Continued on page 75 

AHOY! 29 



JH&3& Mffl2®Q *t 




ISSUE # 1— JAN. '84 $4.00 

The 64 v. the Peanut! The com- 
puter as communications device! 
Protecto's Bill Badger inter- 
viewed! And ready to enter: the 
Multi Draw 64 graphics system! 
The Interrupt Music Maker/ 
Editor! A Peek at Memory! Pro- 
gramming Sequential Files! 



ISSUE #2— FEB. '84 $4.00 

Illustrated tour of the 1541 disk 
drive! Synapse's Ihor Wolosenko 
interviewed! Users groups! Arti- 
ficial intelligence! And ready to 
enter: Music Maker Part II! 
Night Attack! Programming Rel- 
ative Files! Screen Manipulation 
on the Commodore 64! 



ISSUE #3-Mar. '84 $4.00 

Anatomy of the 64! Printer In- 
terfacing for the 64 and VIC! 
Educational software: first of a 
series! Commodares! And 
ready to enter: Space Lanes! 
Random Files on the 64! Easy 
Access Address Book! Dyna- 
mic Power for your 64! 



ISSUE #4— APR. '84 $4.00 

Pctspeed and Easy Script 
tutorials! Printer interfacing and 
educational software guide con- 
tinued! Lower case descenders 
on your 1525! Laserdisc! The 
Dallas Quest Adventure Game! 
And ready to enter: Apple Pie! 
Lunar Lander! Name that Star! 




ISSUE #5— MAY '84 $4.00 

The Future of Commodore! In- 
side BASIC program storage! 
C-64 Spreadsheets! Memory 
Management of the VIC and 64! 
Educational Software Guide 
continues! And ready to enter: 
Math Master! Air Assault! Bio- 
rhythms! VIC 20 Calculator! 



ISSUE #6-JUNE '84 $4.00 

Game programming column 
begins! Program generators! 
Rupert on inputting! Memory 
Management and Educational 
Software Guide continue! And 
ready to enter: Post Time for 
the 64 and 20! Alpiner! Sound 



ISSUE #7- JULY '84 $4.00 

The MSD Dual Disk Drive! 
Database buyer's guide! The 
File Sleuth! Creating your own 
games! Training your cursor! 
Users groups! Commodares! 
And ready to enter: Checklist! 
Renumbering! What's My Job? 
Brisk! Math Defender! More! 



Concept for the VIC 20! 

Send coupon or facsimile to: 

Ahoy! Back Issues, Ion International Inc., 45 West 34th Street— Suite 407, 

I ^_ # Please Send Me The Following: 

^-^ Copies of issue number 

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ADDRESS. 



Enclosed Please Find My Check or 
Money Order for $ 

(Outside the USA please 
add $1 .00 for every copy) 



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ISSUE #8— AUG. '84 $4.00 

Choosing a word processor! 
Unraveling the mysteries of 
sound on the 64! Computa- 
tional wizardry! Creating your 
own word games! And ready to 
enter: Micro-Minder! Direc- 
tory Assistance! The Terrible 
Twins! Words Worth! 

New York, NY 10001 
——| 
I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



Building a Cassette 
Interface 

ForYxir Commodore 64 

The Commodore 64 came into our home like a 
naked baby. It had neither disk drive nor Datasette. 
It played its little games on the TV screen, but its 
miniature programs that I wrote for it were lost 
forever on power d6wn. I already had three disk 
drives and a cassette recorder hooked up to my 
Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 1 computer, so why 

did I need more? My vision was to see the 

Commodore and the TRS-80 talking to each other. 

So my first priority was to be able to save 

programs. I thus built a small and inexpensive 

cassette interface that I could use with my own 

recorder. This article shows how I did it. 





Raader Service No. 179 



I have been designing electronic circuitry for a 
long time. It's my vocation and avocation. I couldn't 
see spending S60 for another cassette recorder, espe- 
cially since I knew that I could build an interface for 
less than Sl5. In fact, I built it for SB. and most of 
the parts came from our local Radio Shack stores, 
whose parts are not always inexpensive. 

If you are the least bit electronically inclined, or 
know of someone who is. you can save yourself a 
number of dollars if you build this device, especially 
if you already have a cassette recorder. Your record- 
er doesn't have to be an expensive unit either. The 
method used to store and retrieve the data is fairly 
immune to noise, volume levels, and saving and 
loading problems, and should be able to work with 
any unit. I say 'should' since I haven't tried it with 
any recorder other than my own Realistic CTR-35. 
But the tapes made with the interface were able to 
be used without any problem on the Datasette. and 
vice versa. 

The specifications for the interface required that it 
work exactly like the Datasette. This meant that it be 
comparable with the Datasette and its tapes, and that 
it start and stop under computer control. Also, it 
should he reliable. Back in the old days of the 
Model I (1977), when the cassette recorder was the 
only way to save programs, the tapes were notorious- 
ly prone to poor loads. The loading of a program 
from tape was at times a test in patience. The vol- 
ume level was very critical, and if it wasn't just 
right, you could spend hours trying to retrieve a pro- 
gram made on another machine. 

The first job I had was to learn how the Commo- 
dore connected to the outside world. One of the 
many ports that arc available is the cassette port. Its 
pinout is shown in Appendix 1 in both the Commo- 
dore 64 Programmer's Reference Guide and the 
Commodore 64 User's Guide. With this pinout. the 
schematic of the C-64. some standard test equipment. 
and a friend who had a Datasette. I discovered the 
deep, dark secrets of Commodore cassette interfacing. 

The pin functions of the port work like this: 

Pin A-l is ground. Ground is always the reference 
connection in any piece of electronic equipment. All 
signals and power voltages are measured from it. 

Pin B-2 is plus five volts (+5v). This is the same 
voltage that actually powers the Datasette as well as 
the computer. 

Pin C-3 is the cassette motor connection. This pin 
is connected to the emitter of a transistor in the 
computer, and is connected to the motor in the Data- 
sette. A signal from the computer turns the transistor 
on and off, just like a switch. Thus the motor will 
turn on and off. 

Pin D-4 is called the Cassette Read pin. This pin 
is an input to the computer. The computer 'reads' 
the signal that comes from the recorder. The signal 
is an amplified voltage of the minute signal that had 



32 AHOY! 




Photo I: outside of the assembled cassette interface. 

been stored on the tape. It is, and always should be, 
at a five volt amplitude. 

Pin E-5 is called Cassette Write. This signal 
comes from the computer and goes to the recorder. 
The signal represents all the bits and bytes that you 
want to save in your program. It is also at a five 
volt amplitude and stays at that level all through the 
Datasetle. It actually drives the recording head in the 
unit after some inversions. 

Pin F-6 is the Cassette Sense input. It is the line 
that tells the computer whether the Datasette is on 
or off. A switch in the Datasette will bring this line 
to the ground level whenever the play switch is 
pressed. If the computer doesn't see a low level 
here, it will display the "Press Play. . .' message 
whenever you load or save a program. 

Now that we know what all the pins do. the next 
step in designing the interlace is to work with each 
line and get some circuitry built that does what the 
Datasette does. The easiest line to start with is the 
ground connection. There is a straight connection 
from the computer to the interface to the cassette re- 
corder. Nothing else need be done. 

The next line is the +5v line. This voltage will 
power all the circuitry in the interface, but will not 
go to the recorder. 

The motor pin is driven from the computer's nine 
volt power source, and is somewhat regulated to 7.5 
volts. Two problems are associated with this line. 
One is that the 7.5 volts is not always 7.5 volts. 




especially when you put a load on it. In fact. I mea- 
sured only 6.5 volts on this line. This is a nice volt- 
age for motors in many cassette recorders, but not 
all of them. So the second problem is how to make 
this line independent of the cassette recorder's own 
voltage. This is simply done by the use of a small 
reed relay. Refer to the schematic to see how this is 
done. 

The 6.5 volts comes in through the C-3 pin. is 
dropped slightly by a resistor, and drives the 5 volt 
relay. The diode connected across the relay protects 
the transistor in the computer from being destroyed 
by a high voltage spike that is produced by the coil 
of the relay. 

The contacts in the relay are connected to the "re- 
mote" line of the cassette recorder. There is also a 
switch across this line to allow the recorder to be 
turned on for fast-forwarding or rewinding. Normally 
the computer controls the recorder. But when the 
computer has turned the recorder off. the only other 




Photo 2: Inside interface, showing bottom of board. 



Photo 3: Layout of the components in the interface. 

way to control the recorder yourself would be to un- 
plug the remote plug. This is boring after a while, 
so this little switch saves wear and tear on the plug 
and your sanity. 

The cassette sense line is the next signal we have 
to process. In my recorder the remote plug is con- 
nected directly to the motor. This plug on most re- 
corders is connected in the same way: it is usually 
in series with the motor. When the recorder is on, 
the cassette's voltage is present on these leads. When 
the recorder is off. one or the other of these leads is 
usually connected to ground through the motor. 

Since that voltage will be unknown in many re- 
corders, and since that voltage has to be inverted, we 
tie it through a resistor and diode to the +5 volts. 
This protects the input of the inverter which can 
only toierale five volts. When there is no voltage, 
that is. a low at the input of the inverter, its output 

AHOY! 33 

I 



is high. The computer sees this as a signal that indi- 
cates the recorder is off. When the recorder is on. 
that is. the play button is pressed, the voltage from 
the recorder causes the output of the inverter to go 
low, thus signaling the computer that the recorder is 
on. 

There are two problems associated with your own 
recorder. The first is how to determine which line 
from the remote plug to use. This can be done by 
measuring the voltage with an open subminiature 
phone plug connected to the remote jack. When the 
recorder is on. one of the pins will have voltage on 
it. You want to use the other line. 

The other problem is if the remote jack is con- 
nected between the motor and ground rather than be- 
tween the drive voltage and the motor. If your own 
cassette recorder works like this, all is not lost. You 
can do one of two things. One is to rewire the jack, 
which may or may not be an involved job. The other 
is that you just have to be more aware of what is go- 
ing on. You permanently tie the sense line to ground. 
and when you arc ready to save a program, you just 
have to make sure that you press the record and play 
buttons before you press the <RETURN> key on 
the computer. And when you load a program, you 



have to press the < RETURN > key before you 
press the play button. 

The next line we design for is the Cassette Write 
line. The computer sends out a signal that is to be 
saved onto tape. This signal is always five volts high. 
but varies in frequency. A zero bit and a one bit are 
converted into two different tones. I won't go into 
the theory of how or why this is done at this time, 
but if you play back the tape on the recorder, you 
can hear the varying tones. Of course you can't do 
this on a Datasettc since it has no speaker. 

The signal from the computer is buffered by one 
of the inverters. This is then filtered and reduced to 
a level that can be accepted by the microphone input 
of the recorder. Most recorders have a MIKE input, 
but not all of them have a high level (or LINE or 
AUX) input. If you want to use a high level input 
into to your recorder, there is a 1 volt signal avail- 
able at the optional AUX output of the circuit (see 
schematic). Also, the automatic gain control of the 
recorder helps to maintain this signal at the right 
level for recording. 

And finally the circuit for the Cassette Read line 
is designed. We must take the signal from the cas- 

Continued on page 75 



FIG. 1: SCHEMATIC OF CASSETTE INTERFACE 



+ 5V 



GND 



B,2 



-o+5V 



CASSETTE 
MOTOR 



C,3 



CASSETTE 

SENSE 



CASSETTE 
WRITE 



E.5 



CASSETTE 
READ 



D,4 



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100 
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(SEE TEXT) 



IN4001 



1 SJ RELAY 



+ 5 



F,6 c<^ 



+ 5 



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330 



IN914 



+ 5 



330 




10K 



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TO AUX PLUG 



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JS PLUG 



34 AHOY! 







* 



J'/ 




Chill out with help from Synapse. 
READER SERVICE NO. 130 

RELAX 

Synapse Software 
Commodore 64 
Disk 

Today's society is more compet- 
itive than any other in history. 
The hustle and bustle creates an 
atmosphere of tension that com- 
pletely permeates our lives. 
Learning to control stress has be- 
come very important, leading peo- 
ple to meditation and biofeedback. 
Now the personal computer has 
entered the arena! 

Relax from Synapse is a hard- 
ware/software package which com- 
bines biofeedback, autogenic train- 
ing, and progressive relaxation 
techniques. Nervous already? 
Don't be. I'll walk you through 
my first encounter with the pro- 
gram. 

I sat down at my C-64 and 
looked at the Relax booklet. It ex- 
plained that Relax works by moni- 
toring the frontallis muscle, the 
area around the temples (you can 
feel this muscle by clenching your 
teeth). Waiting for the disk to 
boot, I adjusted the special head- 
band on my forehead. This con- 
nected to a module which in turn 
went into the Commodore's peri- 



'pheral port. A graph popped up 
on the screen and I waited for a 
jagged line to show whether I was 
tense or not. But the line hugged 
the bottom of the screen. This re- 
laxed I didn't want to be— it 
meant I was dead! I readjusted the 
headband and made certain that 
its sensors were making contact 
with my temples. This was better'?! 
Now the jagged line was fluctuat- 
ing like a fire hose gone crazy. 

This teaches me to skim 
through instructions. An averaged 
rate has to first be set when using 
the program. This is done with a 
series of slide controls on the 
module. Then a fast or slow sam- 
ple is set up. The fast one indi- 
cates how the unconscious is re- 
acting while a slow sample gives 
a more general index of overall 
relaxation. 




A graphic representation of stress. 

The jagged line now averaged 
out, moving up and down as the 
graph scrolled from left to right. I 
dumped my results to a printer 
and consulted the manual. I found 
out I wasn't as hyper as I thought. 

There are also three tension/re- 
laxation games. Sensorial Kaleido- 
scope creates duplicating patterns 
at the edge of the screen. They 
increase in size as tension is re- 
duced, moving towards the center. 
The balloon program has you nav- 
igating a hot-air ship across a 
scrolling landscape. The balloon 
picks up speed as you relax. 

The final program uses a car- 
toon face to mirror your tension 




Dig for black gold in Oil Barons. 
READER SERVICE NO. 131 

level. I was doing fine until I 
glanced at my watch and saw that 
I was late for another appoint- 
ment. My happy face developed a 
most sour look. 

What did I learn? Stress, unfor- 
tunately, is very much a part of 
our lives. Controlling it is not just 
beneficial — it's necessary. Relax 
($149.95) has the potential for be- 
coming not just "another" pro- 
gram, but a useful tool that few 
will want to be without. 

Synapse Software, 5221 Central 
Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 
(phone: 415-527-7751). 

—Marshal Rosenthal 

OIL BARONS 

Epyx Computer Software 
Commodore 64 
Disk; keyboard 

Unplug your joystick. Relax 
those catlike arcade reflexes. Oil 
Barons is a simulation that lets 
you play the role of a wildcat 
driller. Your goal, whether playing 
solo or with up to seven oppo- 
nents, is to buy land at auction, 
survey and drill the best sites, and 
pump black gold straight into your 
bank account. Collect the most 
dough and you win. 

Oil Barons is half board game. 
It comes packaged like an Avalon 
Hill bookshelf game and includes 
a large mapboard, a two-sided 
disk, and several hundred markers. 
Divided into 2000 squares, the 
map consists of small pictures of 

AHOY! 35 



thirteen different types of terrain 
from deserts to ice packs and ci- 
ties to jungles. The markers are 
used to indicate such things as 
ownership, wells, dry holes, and 
national parks. 

The computer plays several crit- 
ical roles in Oil Barons; it is auc- 
tioneer, competitor, banker, real- 
tor. Mother Nature, and newspa- 
per publisher all rolled into one. 
There is no paper— money or 
score cards — in this game. You 
will find, however, that you quick- 
ly realize the need to keep de- 
tailed notes even on information 
that the computer stores. That in- 
formation, like your debts and in- 
come or the results of oil surveys, 
is only available at a certain point 
in your turn. You will want to 
write it down so you can consider 
your strategy between turns. 

As you set the game up, you 
can pick any of seven options for 
play. In Reality games, oil pools 
are generated under the playfield 
regardless of terrain types. In 
Classic games, the chance of 
striking oil is tied to the type of 
terrain you are drilling on. Quick 
games leave out or shorten vari- 



ous parts of the gameplay; wells 
never run dry and government 
never levies taxes. Other game 
options allow you to customize the 
rules to your heart's content. 

When you begin play, the com- 
puter gives each company (player) 
four parcels of land made up of 
two to twelve squares each. At the 
auction at the beginning of each 
turn, you have the chance of pur- 
chase more parcels and occasion- 
ally to buy land from another 
player. 

During each turn, companies 
can survey as many sites as they 
wish and drill at one site. Before 
you do anything, you will get a 
detailed estimate of the cost for 
the survey, drilling rig, and labor. 
Surveys typically are not too bad. 
$100,000 or so. But drilling is ex- 
pensive. You will have to swallow 
hard before drilling on a site that 
received a bad survey. When you 
hit a gusher, though, it is worth 
the cost. Gushers pay twice the 
profit of normally producing wells. 

Survey a swamp, and you will 
see (in simple graphics) an airboat 
blow through the reeds, planting a 
charge and a recorder. Then the 



screen will show a graphic read- 
out of the detonation results. Drill 
in the ocean and a floating der- 
rick will be built. Graphics for 
other terrain types are simple hut 
appropriate. 

At the end of each company's 
part of its turn, several screen 
printouts are shown including a 
portfolio of wells, income state- 
ment, balance sheet, and financial 
summary. At the end of each 
complete turn, the computer-pub- 
lished "Oil Street Journal" is 
printed onscreen. It ranks the 
competing companies, tells you 
which wells have run dry, and re- 
ports on Congressional action al- 
lowing National Parks to be sur- 
veyed . 

Between turns you have the op- 
tion of saving the game: you'll use 
it. Although a Quick game may 
be completed in a lew hours, a 
full-featured, multiplayer game 
could run weeks or months. Oil 
Barons is a complex game. It is 
not difficult to play; in fact the 
instructions cover every detail in 
only ten pages. The computer 
really runs the game and prompts 
you through each turn. 



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36 AHOY! 



The computer also slows things 
down. Each player, as his com- 
pany surveys, drills, and gets re- 
ports, will need to sit at the com- 
puter tor several minutes. Other 
players can use this time to strate- 
gic, but things can get pretty 
slow. Oil Barons, for all its com- 
plexity, may not keep you enter- 
tained while you are waiting. 

Epyx Computer Software, 1043 
Kiel Court. Sunnyvale. CA 94089 
(phone: 408-745-0700). 

— Richard Herring 

LP-10S LIGHT PEN 

Tech-Sketch Inc. 
C-64, VIC 20 

Light pens are a magical peri- 
pheral. Few things I do on my 
computer delight me so much as 
drawing with such a pen. Colors 
and lines bloom on your screen 
with the flick of a pushbutton 
switch on the barrel of the Tech 
Sketch Light Pen. Model LP-IOS 
($39.95). 

As low-cost light pens go. the 
Tech Sketch is fairly accurate and 
easy to use. Plug it into the joy- 
stick port, load light pen software, 
and you're ready to go. 

The Tech Ske'tch for the C-64 

ATTENTION 
PROGRAMMERS! 

Ahoy! is constantly in 
search of the best C-64 and 
VIC 20 programs available, 
in all categories: utilities, 
games, education, graphics, 
music, etc. 

If you've written a pro- 
gram of exceptional quality, 
send it to us on disk or tape, 
accompanied by a printout 
and a self-addressed envelope 
with sufficient return postage 
affixed. (Specify C-64 or VIC 
20, and how much memory 
expansion, if any, is requi- 
red.) Ahoy! pays competitive 
rates, on acceptance. 



comes in a choice of two pack- 
ages—with Paint TV Sketch or 
with MicrulUustrator. Both are 
drawing programs. The Microll- 
lustrator package is $30 more — 
S69.95. You can buy Micmlllits- 
trator separately for $40, but Paint 
TV" Sketch is only available with 
the pan. Tech Sketch also publish- 
es a number of educational pro- 
grams which use the light pen. 
some of which are very good. 
The LP-10S works on the" VIC 20. 
although the VIC version comes 
with a different drawing program. 




RKADER SERVICE NO. 176 

If I did not have MicroHhtstra- 
tor, I would probably be delighted 
with Paint TV" Sketch, The latter 
is an elementary program. It fea- 
tures three colors (orange, green, 
and blue) and several drawing 
modes. You can do freehand 
drawing, lines, rectangles, trian- 
gles, and circles. A till mode 
floods line-enclosed spaces with 
color, and erase lets you remove 
what you don't want. 

Using the pen takes some prac- 
tice. Small children may find it 
frustrating. Sometimes it's out of 
calibration and the cursor symbol 
on the screen is not directly under 
the point of the light pen. If the 
cursor is somewhere different than 
where you think it is, or if you 



don't hold the pen square to the 
screen, the computer may not 
read the signal. 

When you choose a new color 
or a different drawing mode from 
the drawing menu, a bell rings to 
tell you that you succeeded. You 
may have to turn up the bright- 
ness or contrast to get the pen to 
respond reliably. If you use any 
drawing mode but freehand, you 
must choose it again alter each 
operation. Having to select line 
mode for every straight line you 
draw is annoying. 

While Paint TV" Sketch is sup- 
posedly more elementary than Mi- 
crotthtst ratar, I found the latter 
easier to use. It also has much 
greater graphic capability. You 
have all 16 of the C-64's colors. 
plus two cross-hatch textures for 



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AHOY! 37 



each color. You have a choice of 
several "brush" widths. You have 
lines, circles, tllled-in discs and 
blocks, and rectangles as well as 
draw and fill. 

The real fun begins if you 
choose mirror or rays. Mirror du- 
plicates ever> line you draw so 
that tour lines, which mirror one 
another, all appear as it' by magic. 
When you select rays, you define 
two points, and a graceful tan of 
lines follows the arc of your pen. 
Other functions on the Microlllns- 
irator menu include magnify 
(which lets you work on a blown- 
up section of your picture), cali- 
brate, erase, and disk operations. 

Both Paint TV" Sketch and Mi- 
crolllustrator let you save pictures 
to disk and reload them for view- 
ing or change. I understand that 
new versions of Microlllustrator 



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• Parents Tell your kids Cadmean's The 
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Reader Service No. 187 



38 AHOY! 



will also have a printer routine for 
hardcopy versions of your pic- 
tures. Printing won't transfer the 
colors, but will let you use the 
program to print black and white 
designs. 

Even Paint 'N' Sketch lets you 
create interesting pictures. Micro- 
Illustrator gives you control and 
flexibility equivalent to almost am 
other two-dimensional art medium. 
1 showed this program to an art 
teacher (who dislikes computers), 
and she was thrilled and amazed 
al how easily she could create 
spectacular effects. 

Erasing part of the picture is 
difficult, as the erase menu un- 
does your most recent operation 
or blows away the whole picture. 
Drawing with the background col- 
or works for erase, but takes pa- 
tience and skill. 

Light pens and programs for 
them are likely to be increasingl) 
available. The Tech Sketch pen 
works with other vendors' soft- 
ware, so you will not be locked 
into the Tech Sketch software line 
if you purchase it. 

Writing your own programs lor 
a light pen is easy. Hither the us- 
er's manual for the light pen or 
the C-64 Programmer's Reference 
Manual has the essentia! informa- 
tion. Points around the edge of 
the screen are hard to use precise- 
ly, but that's your Commodore 
computer rather than the light pen 

1 1" you want to experiment with 
a light pen. the Tech Sketch is as 
good as any in its price range. 
The trigger button on its barrel 
makes it easy to control, and is 
preferable to using a key on the 
keybtxird. as the Edumate Light 
Pen docs. 

If you have dreams of drawing 
in light and color. I urge you to 
consider buying the more expen- 
sive Tech Sketch package with 
Microlllustrator. You will soon 
outgrow the capabilities of Faint 



TV" Sketch, but Microlllustrator 
will delight your artistic ego for a 
long time. Save your masterpieces 
to disk, and you can display them 
at parlies or send them to your 
friends or just look at them in 
fresh, living splendor for years af- 
ter you make them. 

Tech-Sketch Inc.. 26 Just Road. 
Fairfield. NJ 07006 (phone: 201- 
227-7724). 

—Annette Hinshaw 

ESP>CALC 

New Ia'qJ, Inc. 
C-64, VIC 20 
Disk 

No, this program won't help 
you solve complicated math prob- 
lems through extrasensory percep- 
tion. The ESP in this case stands 
for Electronic Spreadsheet Plan- 
ning. Like most spreadsheets. 
ESP>Calc lets you perform a 
number of mathematical opera- 
tions on several numerical values 
at once. The numbers, which arc 
arranged in rows and columns, 
may he listed, added, subtracted, 
multiplied, divided, compared, 
and even forecasted for future 
periods. 

If you've never used a spread- 
sheet, its exact usefulness may 
still seem somewhat unclear. This 
is partis because a spreadsheet is 
really a multipurpose piece of 
software. Depending on the 
spreadsheet's layout, the numerical 
data you supply it with, and the 
operations it's instructed lo per- 
form, a spreadsheet can help you 
plan your household budget, chart 
biorhylhms. or even analyze the 
performance of selected stocks. 

To help you get the most from 
ESP>Calc. the folks at New Leaf 
have packed the disk in a loose- 
leaf binder containing close to 150 
pages of instructions, examples. 
and trouble-shooting tips. There's 
even an operations glossary that 
shows the exact formats to use for 



each possible operation and illus- 
trative samples that you can try 
for yourself. It seems like a lot of 
material to wade through, but 
only the first few sections are 
needed to get you started. In addi- 
tion, most of the screens arc self- 
explanatory and you always have 
the option of calling up the HELP 
screen to get a list of your avail- 
able options. 

To design your own spreadsheet 
you should first do a rough sketch 
on paper to figure out how many 
rows and columns you will need. 
their titles, and what operations 
you'll want it to perform. When 
you run the program it will ask 
you to input the number of rows 
and columns and then ask you the 
names of each. If sou make a 
mistake or the spreadsheet has to 
be expanded at some later time, it 
is a simple matter to change the 
headings of columns and rows and 
even insert new ones as they're 
needed. 

After the program checks for 
duplicate titles, it's time to specify 
the operations you want per- 
formed. Using a simple example 
from the instruction manual, if 
COL 1 represents the amounts 
you've budgeted for a given 
month. COL 2 the amounts you 
actually spent, and you want COL 
3 to display the difference be- 
tween the two. you would enter 
the following: C3=CI— C2. In 
the same example. ROW 4 re- 
ceives the totals for all expendi- 
tures in the first three columns as 
a result of the operation R4 = 
R1#R3. The "#" (number) symbol 
is used in ESP > Calc to mean the 
sum of the first row or column 
listed, through the last. In this 
case. ROW 1 through ROW 3. 

Don't get the wrong impression. 
ESP > Calc can handle a lot more 
than simple household budgets. 
The manual also includes a com- 
pleted model of a spreadsheet that 



can be used to monitor your utili- 
ty costs. It contains 17 columns 
and 31 rows for a total of 527 in- 
dividual cells. It performs 23'op- 
erations which calculate every- 
thing from changes in utility rales 
to total utility costs on a monthly, 
quarterly, and annual basis. 

By studying this example and 
others included in the ESP > Calc 
manual, you will soon learn how 
to set up complex spreadsheets of 
your own. Whether you need a 
spreadsheet to calculate tax deduc- 
tions or the odds for major sport- 
ing events, ESP > Calc can help 
you keep those numbers in line. 

New Leaf. Inc.. 120 Lvnnhaven. 
Belleville. IL 62223. 

—Lloyd Davics 

SARGON II 

Havden Software 

C-64 

Disk, cassette 

If you have an ego, don't buy 
this game. Who wants to get 
stomped by silicon chips'? Saigon 
II ($34.95) is an improved version 
of the original Sargon; it is both 
smarter and faster. So fast, in 
fact, that you will be tempted to 
play at higher skill levels. Where 
some chess programs will take 
hours to move at intermediate lev- 
els. Sargon II will respond in 
minutes. (Sargon III. running on 
an accelerated Apple II. was the 
first microcomputer program to 
beat a rated Chess Master in tour- 
nament play.) 

Seven skill levels are available, 
numbered (as is the norm in the 
computer world) through 6. The 
number of the skill level repre- 
sents the minimum number of halt" 
moves ahead which the computer 
will consider. At level 0. where 
the computer considers only its 
current move, the response is im- 
mediate. By skill level 4. where 
the computer is considering its 
next three moves and your next 




Seven skill levels are available. 
READER SERVICE NO. 135 

two. response lime runs about six 
minutes. By level 6. the computer 
will take about four hours to con- 
sider the possibilities. 

The chess board is conventional. 
You get a two-dimensional aerial 
view of the board with a profile 
view of each piece. Squares are 
represented by file (columns A to 
H) and rank (rows I to 8). Ranks 
are always labeled on both sides 
of the board. Files are another 
matter — an annoying matter. The 
line below ihc board shows your 
level, the number of half moves 
ahead the computer is thinking. 
and your move as you type it in. 
The file labels are not visible un- 
less you toggle off the command 
line, and then you cannot see your 
moves as you type them in. 

Sargon II has no joystick op- 
tion: you must enter moves in al- 
gebraic notation (B1-C3 moves 
your knight out). If you enter an 
illegal move, or are placed in 
check, the computer beeps a 
warning. Any time you want to 
review the moves so far, a single 
keystroke will toggle to a second 
screen where both sides' moves 
are listed. All legal moves, includ- 

AHOY! 39 



iiig castle and capture en passant, 
arc allowed. 

One of the best features of Sar- 
gon II is the ease with which it 
allows you to set up a midgame 
hoard. Alter moving to the square 
you want (with the cursor keys) 
just type the first letters of the 
piece's name and of its color. You 
can even indicate if it has been 
moved or not so the computer can 
determine (he legality of certain 
moves. When you have the board 
suitably stacked for a sure win. 
tell the program which color 
moves next, what color and level 
you want, and approximately how 
many moves into the game your 
board is. The computer's strategy 
gets tougher toward the end of the 
game. 

fhis editing feature can be used 
not only to set up a game, but 
aKo while you are playing. By 
going into edit mode, you can 





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take back a move or two. Didn't 
notice that your queen was open 
when you advanced that pawn, 
did you? If you edit during the 
middle of a game, the second 
screen list of moves is not avail- 
able. So if you are going to undo 
many moves, you may have to 
look at that screen and write ev- 
erything down before you edit. 

If Saigon II is proving to be too 
tough an opponent, you can al- 
ways kibbutz. Press a function key 
and Saigon will offer up a possi- 
ble solution to your predicament. 
Unfortunately for beginners, hints 
are not available at the lowest lev- 
el. And don't feel that getting a 
little help is cheating. After all. 
the instructions ask. "Ah. but will 
Saigon I! give you a move it 
doesn't have an answer for*.'" 

Heyden Software. 600 Suffolk 
Street. Lowell. MA 01853 (phone: 
800-343-1218). 

—Richard Herring 

WIZARD OF WORDS 

Advanced Ideas 
Commodore 64 
Disk 

Wizard of Words ($39.95) is a 
set of five educational games 
geared toward spelling and recall- 
ing words. On the front of the 
disk are the five games, on the 
back is the Wizard's Royal Regis- 
try of Words, a 38.000 word list. I 
wish the spelling checker for my 
word processor had as complete a 
dictionary! From the program's 
main menu, you select any game 
or the option of building your own 
word lists. Once that game is 
loaded, turn the disk over, or in- 
sert a copy of the word list, and 
you are off. If you're worried 
about changing disks in the mid- 
dle of a program, don't be. Try to 
play a game without inserting the 
word list and the program re- 
sponds "Oops! Disk problem: Be 
sure the Wizard of Words Disk is 



in place and that the disk door is 
closed." Each game has multiple 
difficulty levels, so this software 
is appropriate to a broad age 
range. The instructions say 7 to 
13. but at my house a score of 
people from 5 to 38 have enjoyed 
the program. 

In Jester's Jumble a medieval 
court jester with a two-pointed hat 
stands next to a striped circus tent 
juggling colored balls. When you 
are ready to play, he tosses the 
balls to the top of the screen 
where they freeze into the letters 
of a scrambled word which you 
must unscramble. After each in- 
correct guess, the jester will jug- 
gle the letters again and throw 
them up into a pattern that is a 
little easier (o recognize. Eventu 
ally, he may solve the word before 
you do. The scrambled word is 
presented in large letters and the 
jester stops juggling while you are 
trying to unscramble them so you 
are not distracted. 

The second game is Castle Ca- 
pers, a non-violent version of 
hangman. Up to eight banners are 
rolled up along the escarpment of 
a stone castle. In the blue waters 
of the moat below float all the let- 
ters of the alphabet. When you 
guess a letter, it disappears from 
the moat so you arc only prompt- 
ed to guess (and the game will 
only accept) letters which have 
not already been chosen. If your 
guess was correct, the king runs 
out of the tower to one or more 
of the banners and unfurls your 
letter. If you are wrong, the castle 
gate lowers a little. When the gate 
is completely closed, you are out 
of guesses. 

My favorite game on this disk 
is Dragon's Spell. Because I think 
it is the best game for kids? Nope, 
because it is the most fun for 
adults. A big green dragon with a 
pointed tail referees this game for 
two players (or two teams). After 



40 AHOY! 



he snorts out the letters of a long 
word onto the screen, he challeng- 
es you to make up as many short- 
er words as possible using only 
the letters of the long word. As 
you type in words, the dragon will 
peruse his little blue dictionary, 
his eyes rolling back and forth, 
looking for your word. If he finds 
it, he will shoot flame from his 
snout, your word will appear on a 
list, and you will get one point 
for each letter. (Only twelve 
words can show onscreen at one 
time.) If your word has already 
been used, he will shake his head 
and let you try again. Whenever 
you use a word that the dragon 
cannot find, he will tell you so 
and ask you to look it up in your 
dictionary. This friendly dragon 
has unquestioning faith when you 
tell him that your guess was really 
a word. 

Wc have probably all played a 
game like this on the back of a 
paper placemat at Pizza Hut. The 
strength of Dragon's Spell lies in 
its interactivity. This dragon has 
the personality of the waving dip- 
lomats in Choplifter or the hero 
Shamus. Grownups can play with 
kids by changing a rule or two. 
The grownup can limit himself to 
six-letter or longer words and then 
cut his score in half. I especially 
appreciate this game's emphasis 
on using a dictionary. It's unusual 
for that particular book to get 
much use in a playful, fun activi- 
ty. When the game ends, our pal 
the dragon says thanks for playing. 

Word Spinning is the fourth 
game. A princess spins out a pat- 
tern on the screen similar to a 
crossword puzzle. Players take 
turns fitting words into rows or 
columns of blank spaces. The 
challenge comes in trying to think 
of a word when several of the let- 
ters (from intersecting words) are 
already filled in. When you type a 
word, the princess will check to 



see if it is in the Wizard's word 
list or ask you to check your dic- 
tionary. Each correct word in- 
creases your score. When the pat- 
tern is all filled in, a frog will 
hop across the screen, kiss the 
princess and. lo and behold— turn 
her into a frog. Won! Spinning not 
only challenges you to spell words 
correctly, but also forces you lo 
he creative in thinking up words 
which match the pattern. 

The last game is Herald's Hark, 
a takeoff on MasterMind. You 
guess any word with the correct 
number of letters and. of course. 
on the Wizard's list. A herald will 
raise his horn and play a few 
notes which will turn into your 
word as they hit a tapestry in the 
middle of the screen. The number 
of correct letters will appear 
alongside your guess. Although 
separate word lists arc displayed 
for two players, when the correct 
word is guessed, both heralds will 
play and the program will say 
"You guessed our word." Since 
both players' guesses provide 
clues about the hidden word, it 
seems appropriate that both play- 
ers are rewarded. 

Writing reviews is not always 
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AHOY! 41 



GRIEATING YOUR OWN GAMES 

Continued from page 20 

but they also have a lot in common with fiction. As 

an avid reader since childhood and an even more 

avid writer of fiction since they started paying me 

for doing it, I enjoy and admire a good story told 

well. 

Part of telling a good story is creating an inter- 
esting, believable milieu, the environment where the 
story takes place. It is quite possible, as many ad- 
venture writers have proved, to create text adventures 
that are utterly dull, often because the world of the 
game is uninteresting, filled with humdrum items 
and people so boring you'd rather die than meet 
them at a party. 

Many adventure game makers think that to make 
places interesting, they must describe them in purple 
prose: "You see a fantastically beautiful reddish-gold 
cliff. From the top of it flows a magnificent silver 
waterfall which creates a rainbowed mist at the base 
of the cliff." I mean. wow. 

What makes a person, place, or object interesting 
is its potential for conflict, experience, or informa- 
tion. Too many games (including, alas, even Zork) 
are filled with objects that just sit there. A big 
emerald, for instance. To make it really exciting, 
they call it a really big emerald, or even a huge 
emerald. Almost too much excitement to bear, isn't 
it? 

I much prefer finding a rusty knife in the hand of 
a skeleton, which turns out to have a curse on it so 
thai the more you use it, the more likely you are to 
kill yourself with it. I prefer entering an ancient 
buried temple by climbing down a rope, or finding 
at the bottom of a stairway that I am standing at the 
gates of Hell. These all happen in Zork I. Surprises, 
yes, but they make sense in the context of the game: 
they are also memorable experiences. 

A good adventure will have much the same effect 
as a good story. The author shapes the player's ex- 
perience, but with computer adventures, the order of 
events and many key decisions depend on the play- 
er's own choices. There isn't much character devel- 
opment and dialogue is always a little weak, but 
there's plenty of action and suspense, and as many 
puzzles to solve as in a good mystery. 

OTHER PEOPLE IN ADVENTURE GAMES 

When I meet a person in my adventure, I want 
him to be doing something. Just standing with his 
hands in his pockets, whistling. Or skinning a rabbit. 
Or passing her hands over a crystal ball, muttering 
something under her breath while she surreptitiously 

42 AHOY! 



glances in my direction. Or offering me a cup of 
what looks like hot milk. Or locking the door of the 
bank and getting nasty when I keep trying to get in. 

Unfortunately, few adventure games really offer a 
chance to meet other characters and interact with 
them. It's hard enough to program the player's move- 
ments through a game without also having to worry 
about a dozen other characters. 

The one adventure game that handles people su- 
perbly, however, is Murder on the Zinderneuf from 
Electronic Arts. In Zinderneuf, you are a detective 
who has to identify a murder on a luxury zeppelin 
flight before the airship lands. In the process, you 
must examine different rooms, talk to many people, 
and finally make accusations. 

Each time you play, there is a different victim, a 
different murderer, and you yourself play the role of 
a different detective. You can choose from a list of 
several detectives, which are designed to resemble 
such fictional stalwarts as Herculc Poirot and Miss 
Marple. Naturally, suspects will have differing reac- 
tions to the different detectives. Also, you can 
choose the manner of your questioning. If you 
happen to be a good-looking woman detective, you 
can choose to be seductive: if you are a physically 
imposing man, you can choose to be belligerent 

This makes for fascinating, unpredictable interac- 
tions between you and the various suspects. Most 
adventure games run the risk of becoming dull be- 
cause after a few plays you've seen most of the scen- 
ery; Zinderneuf always has the same scenery, but the 
people create many possibilities. It makes it a superb 
storytelling game— which is no surprise, since one of 
the creators is a sometime science fiction writer, be- 
sides being an excellent game designer. I'm never 
surprised when science fiction writers turn out to be 
brilliant in other fields as well. . . 

PICTURES AND PUZZLES 

Murder on the Zinderneuf doesn't confine itself to 
words— it takes place on a floorplan of the zeppelin. 
and you move around like a figure in a videogame, 
as do the other characters. Words only take up a 
small part of the screen. This graphic approach has 
been taken by other game designers. 

Many games show pictures of each scene in the 
game, instead of using verbal descriptions. Some 
pictures are quite sketchy^virtually diagrams. Other 
games use pictures that are as close to cartoon ani- 
mation as is possible on a home computer. But a 
more significant difference, I think, is the way the 
pictures are used. 

If the pictures are used like still photographs, with 



all the action taking place using words that appear in 
one part of the screen. I consider it to be an illus- 
trated text adventure. A good illustrated adventure 
will still convey vital information through the pic- 
tures—you should be able to learn things by looking, 
rather than just seeing a pretty scene. 

If the action actually takes place inside the picture 
—if figures move around and interact almost like a 
videogame, even though words might also be used, 
then I call it an animated adventure. Animated ad- 
ventures begin to act like arcade-style videogames, 
except that they still use the "room to room" pattern 
of text adventures, so that you explore, find objects, 
and interact with other characters. Unlike video- 
games, you have times when you can pause to think, 
to reflect, to figure things out, though at other times 
you might have to move quickly to save your life. 

PROS AND CONS OF THE 
DIFFERENT APPROACHES 

All adventure games use up memory in big gulps. 
Figure that a good adventure game will probably 
have at least 30 different rooms or scenes — most 
have many times that number. Each scene will have 
a description, which consists of many words. And 
there'll be at least a dozen objects, and a few char- 
acters, and many, many different events that can hap- 
pen, all of which have to be included in the game. 
There aren't many adventures that can fit in an 
unexpanded VIC. My very simple Emerald Elephant 
of Cipangu, the same game that you'll sec in its en- 
tirety next month, won't fit in the VIC — even with- 
out the REM statements it requires approximately 
13K of memory. 

Adventure gamewrights aren't alone in worrying 
about memory. Memory is always the limitation on 
the game designer's creativity. But it's an especially 
knotty problem with illustrated and animated adven- 
tures: If each screen display takes 8K on the high- 
res screen, how many different screens can you fit 
on each disk? How many can reside in memory at a 
time? Each time the player moves to a place whose 
illustration isn't already in RAM, the program has to 
stop and load the 8K display from disk, while the 
player waits, impatient to see what happens next. 

Text adventures have it easier— but even they usu- 
ally resort to disk accesses during the course of a 
game, because not all the game will fit into memory 
at once. Each disk access slows down the game, es- 
pecially with a drive as slow as the 1541. and since 
all-text adventures usually don't have to access the 
disk as often, text adventures are usually much faster 
to play than the graphics adventures. 



Infocom claims, and I tend to agree with them, 
that text adventures have another advantage over 
graphics adventures and videogames besides memory 
use and speed. It is the same adventure that books 
have over movies. As a writer of books, I admit I 
am biased, but the fact remains that in my science 
fiction novels I can create special effects that would 
cost George Lucas's Industrial Light and Magic 
Inc., millions of dollars to bring off— if they could 
do it at all. And all it costs me is a few keypresses 
on my word processor. 

Similarly, an all-text adventure shows you things 
that could never exist anywhere but in imagination — 
because it is in your imagination where the scene is 
drawn. A good artist for an illustrated adventure 
might be able to show you an excellent version of 
that place— but it will be only one artist's version, 
and only one angle of view, and it will only look as 
good as the computer itself will allow. To my way of 
thinking, you and I can still imagine much better art 
than any computer artist has yet shown us. 

At the same time, this is also text adventures' dis- 
advantage: there's nothing to see on the screen but 
words. 

Animated adventures have an advantage over text 
or illustrated adventures. When you actually control 
player movement with a joystick, it becomes more 
immediate; players experience the events more di- 
rectly than when they have to type in words, espe- 
cially if they aren't 60 wpm touch typists. 

Someday, when home computers routinely use vid- 
eodisc technology to access thousands of screen dis- 
plays in an instant, with very, very high-resolution 
graphics, we'll see adventures that combine all the 
advantages of text and graphics adventures, along 
with Disney quality cartoon drawings. For now, 
though, I'll stick with pure text adventures. 

The nicest thing is that text-only adventures really 
aren't hard to program. They're hard to create, in 
the same way that a short story is hard to create- 
but the actual programming, once you know how ta- 
bles work, is pretty straightforward. 

SO LET'S START PROGRAMMING 

In this column we'll create the basic structure of a 
small text adventure game. Next month we'll flesh it 
out and create a complete— but brief— game called 
Vie Emerald Elephant of Cipangu. 

Where do we begin? Let's set this adventure in a 
castle. In the tradition of most adventure games, 
we'll begin outside the castle so the player has to 
figure out how to get inside. Figure 1 is a rough 
floorplan of the castle, with an elevation to show 

AHOY! 43 



how the upper and lower levels stack up. 

If this were an animated adventure, our program- 
ming task would be to draw the castle and allow a 
figure to move around in it. something we've done 
in past installments of this column. But a text adven- 
ture uses a completely different method. Instead of 
putting this floorplan on the screen, we divide it up 
into a Room and Direction Table. 

This floorplan naturally divides itself into 13 
rooms. A "room" doesn't mean an indoor space — it 
refers to any one place where the player can be. So 
there are four rooms outside the castle: the area 
north of the castle, west of the castle, east of the 
castle, and south of the castle. There are 9 rooms 
inside: the kitchen, the courtyard, the gatehouse, the 
walls where the castle defenders would stand, the 
great hall, the bedchamber, the top of the tower, the 
stables, and the dungeons. 

Naturally, a real castle would have many more 
possible locations — and we could as easily program a 
hundred rooms as fourteen. But the editors of Ahoy! 
assure me that they want to have room in the maga- 
zine for something besides my column, so we're 
keeping this very small. 

Once we decide what rooms you want in your ad- 
venture, write them down in a particular order and 
number them. It doesn't matter what order they're in 
—it makes no different whether the great hall is 
room 5 or room 3. 

These numbers, which represent the order of the 
rooms in the Room Direction Table, will be the key 
to the whole program. To keep track of where the 
player is at any one time, all we need to know is the 
number of the present room, which we'll store in the 
variable PR. 

That number is the index into other tables. For in- 
stance, the Room Name Table, stored in the string 
array RNSfnJ, will hold the room names in the same 
order as the Room Direction Table. To display the 
name of the present room, we just PRINT RNS(PR) 
and we automatically have the right name. 

Sometimes there's a logical reason for grouping 
rooms together in a particular order. By numbering 
the rooms outside the castle from 1 to 4. we can test 
to see if the player is inside or outside the castle 
with a simple IF PR<5 THEN. . .or inside the cas- 
tle with IF PR>4 THEN.... 

It isn't enough, however, just to number the rooms. 
Each room needs to have a sub-table with it — the list 
of what lies in each direction the player might move 
from that room. 

Since one example is worth a thousand words, let's 
lay out the table. Here is the list of rooms in the or- 

44 AHOY! 



der we'll use: 

1. CASTLE MAIN GATE 

2. MEADOW WEST OF CASTLE 

3. LEDGE EAST OF CASTLE 

4. GROVE SOUTH OF CASTLE 

5. KITCHEN 

6. COURTYARD 

7. GATEHOUSE 

8. ON THE WALLS 

9. GREAT HALL 

10. COUNT'S CHAMBER 

11. "TOWER LOOKOUT 

12. STABLES 

13. DUNGEON 

14. TREASURE ROOM 

The TREASURE ROOM wasn't on the floorplan. 
That's because we're going to assign its location ran- 
domly during the program, so that i( can be in one 
of many different locations each time the game is 
played. That way the game will be different each 
time it's played. 

We also need a Direction List. Later, this list will 
be part of the Command Table. Lei's have eight pos- 
sible directions: North. South. East, West. Up 
Down. In. and Out. We'll number them accordingly: 

1. NORTH 

2. SOUTH 

3. EAST 

4. WEST 

5. UP 

6. DOWN 

7. IN 

8. OUT 

These two lists are combined, so that for each 
room, there is a series of eight numbers, telling 
what room the player will reach if he goes in a par- 
ticular direction. Let's look at the Direction Table 
for room 6. the courtyard: 
Direction Destination 

1 (North) 7 (Gatehouse) 

2 (South) 5 (Kitchen) 

3 (East) 9 (Great Hall) 

4 (West) 12 (Stables) 

5 (Up) 7 (Gatehouse) 

6 (Down) ? (Kitchen) 

7 (In) 9 (Great Hall) 

8 (Out) 7 (Gatehouse) 

Notice that three different directions. North. Up. 
and Out— lead to the Gatehouse. This is because the 
Gatehouse lies to the north, the courtyard slopes up- 
ward toward the Gatehouse, and when you want to 
go out. the Gatehouse is the logical place to go. It 
will often happen that two different direction instruc- 



lions will lead to the same place. 

The Room Direction Table will be set up in the 
two-dimensional array RD(ti,n). The first index is 
the room number: the second index is the direction 
number. For instance, suppose we are in room d, the 
courtyard, and the player asks to go north. The play- 
er's command is held in the variable CM. which has 
a value of 1, which means north. The room we are 
presently in is PR. This statement will put us in the 
new room: 

PR=RD(PR,CM) 

Since PR =6 and CM = I. PR is now set to the 
value of RD(6,1), which has a value of 7. Therefore 
we are now in room 7, the Gatehouse. If the player 
had chosen to go in, CM would have had a value of 
7. so PR would now be set to the value of RD(6.7). 
which has a value of 9. So we would be in room 9. 
the Great Hall. 

COPING WITH ILLEGAL MOVES 

Often the player will ask to go in a direction that 
doesn't lead anywhere. For instance, if the player is 
at Castle Main Gate, we want him to be able to go 
east or west, to get to either Meadow West of Castle 
or Ledge East of Castle. But we don't want him to 
go any other direction. After all. we aren't putting 
anything north of the castle at all. and it would be 
too obvious to let him get in the main gale. So we 
need to have some dummy rooms— rooms where you 
can't actually go. which allow the program to re- 
spond to the player's directions. 

A simple solution is just to say that all illegal di- 
rections will return a value of 50, and the "name" of 
room 50 is -YOU CANT GO THAT WAY." Then, 
if the player called for an illegal direction— say. 
RD(l.l). which means "go north from Castle Main 
Gate— the value of RD(l.l) would be 50. When the 
program PRINTs the new room "name," it would 
print RNS(50), which says "YOU CAN'T GO 
THAT WAY." 

An easy way to enhance a game, however, is to 
have several different "illegal move" messages. For 
instance, if the player tries to climb the castle walls 
by commanding up, that direction can have a value 
of 51. which says, "YOU CAN'T CLIMB IT." Or if 
the player ties to go off the cliff to the east of Ledge 
East of Castle, the value of RD0.3) can be 54. and 
RN${54) would say. "ARE YOU TRYING TO GET 
US KILLED?" 

Why so many different illegal-move messages? For 
one thing, it makes the game more interesting. It 



gives the illusion that the computer is "alive," watch- 
ing what's going on and responding differently for 
different moves. 

Also, the illegal-move messages can communicate 
vital information. In the full game next month, we'll 
require the player to be holding certain objects in or- 
der to gel through the secret door into the Treasure 
Room. If the player tries to go the direction that 
leads to the Treasure Room while not holding those 
objects, he'll get the error message "YOU DON'T 
HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO GET IN THERE." 
That's a clue that if he did have the right things in 
his possession, he could gel in. 

Illegal- move messages can also imply that the 
game world is larger than the actual number of 
rooms would imply. For instance, this message hints 
that there are many other rooms in the castle: "YOU 
SEARCH THAT AREA AND FIND NOTHING OF 
INTEREST." 

In our game we'll have six illegal-move messages, 
numbered from 50 to 56, Each will have an entry in 
the Room Name Table, so RNS(«J has to be DIMen- 
sioned to 56. However, since we will never actually 
go to those rooms, the Room Direction Table does 
not have to have an entry for those "rooms." RD(n) 
is therefore DIMcnsioned only for the lotal number 
of rooms where the player can go. which is 14. 

SINGLE-KEYSTROKE PARSING 

Instead of going into complicated parsing algo- 
rithms, our game will be controlled by the simplest 
possible interface. Every command can be entered 
by pressing a single key on the keyboard. This en- 
ables us to PEEK the player's instructions at location 
197. 

The Command Word Table, which will be con- 
tained in the string array CWSOiJ. has the following 
entries, numbered from to 16: 
Number Letter Word 

illegal "WHAT'" 

1 N ' "NORTH" 

2 S "SOUTH" 

3 E "EAST" 

4 W "WEST" 

5 U "UP" 

6 D "DOWN" 

7 I "IN" 

8 O "OUT" 

9 B "BACK" (go back to the last 

room we were in) 

10 T "TAKE" (pick up an object 

in this room) 

11 L "LEAVE" (leave one object 

AHOY! 45 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



we're carrying) 
P "PEER" (peer closely at this 

room to learn more about it) 
G "GOT?" (what objects do we 

have right now?) 
Q "QUIT" (give up and quit 

the game) 
H "HELP" (display my op- 

tions) 
? "HELP" (same as 15) 

When the player presses one of the keys, the ap- 
propriate word will be displayed at the top of the 
screen, as if he had typed the entire word. This is 
the opposite approach to the one Infoeom uses. 
Where Infoeom allows the player to type sentences 
that are very much like English, in our game we're 
expecting the player lo learn a code. Infocom's ap- 
proach is much better— but much harder to program. 
We're going for simplicity right now. so we'll make 
the player memorize some commands and save our- 
selves the work of developing a parser. 

EXPLORE THE CASTLE 

We're just about ready to write the actual pro- 
gram. Remember, though, thai this is only the sim- 
ple, preliminary version. Only the directional com- 
mands will work. All the others will display on the 
screen, but nothing will happen. So all you can do 
with this program is move from room to room, get- 
ting the illegal move messages or the new room 
name. 

Still, the Treasure Room is random I v assigned and 




"Get thee behind me while I think it over.' 
46 AHOY! 



you have to figure out where the castle can be en- 
tered. Also, the movement patterns are pretty tricky. 
You can't always get back the way you came. For in- 
stance, the door in the Great Hall that leads out into 
the Courtyard is in the north of the great hall. But if 
you're in the Courtyard, you are assumed to be 
standing in the middle of the open area, so that the 
Great Hall is to your east. To go from the Great 
Hall to the Courtyard, then, you would type N for 
north; to get back from the Courtyard to the Great 
Hall, however, you would type, not S \bv soutli, but 
E for east. 

The program listing is found on page 94. I have 
included REM statements to identify what is going 
on. but as usual you don't need to type these in. 
They're only there to help you follow the program 
logic. 

The program lines from 1000 on are the set-up 
routine. All the values for the various tables are con- 
tained in DATA statements, which I have tried to 
make as clear as possible. 

The main loop of the program starts at line 100. Il 
jumps to the subroutine at 990. which gets a key- 
press and converts it to a command number (CM): 
if the command is a directional command (1-8). the 
program jumps to the movement subroutine at 300; 
otherwise the main loop simply PRINTs the com- 
mand word CWS(CM) and goes back for the next 
keypress. 

Next month, we'll flesh out the program by imple- 
menting all (he other commands, so the player can 
pick things up and put them down. Then, instead of 
just exploring the rooms of the castle, the player will 
be searching through the Castle of Darkness for the 
magic Emerald Elephant of Cipangu. The player will 
be able to open the main gate and unlock the door 
of the hidden Treasure Room— but only if he can 
figure out which objects he needs to be carrying in 
order to do it. 

In (he meantime, there's nothing to stop you from 
using this simple exploration program as the basis 
for your own game. You don't want a castle? Just 
change the room names in the Room Name Table. 
You want more rooms? Just DIMension RD(n,n) for 
the number of rooms you want and add entries to 
the Room Name Table and the Room Direction Ta- 
ble. For instance, if you want 30 rooms, you would 
DIMension RD(30.8). (Notice that the number of di- 
rections per room remains the same.) As long as you 
assign eight destinations for each room in the room 
direction table, you can handle any number of rooms 
up to 49 with this simple program. lH 

SEE PROGRAM USTLXG OX PAGE 94 



CCMM 



DAMES 



l1?GGI?AMMINO CI-IAI.I.ISNGISS 



By Dale Rupert 




ach month, we'll present several challenges 
designed to toggle the bits in your cerebral 
random access memory. We invite you to 
send your solutions to: 

Commodares, c/o AHOY! 
P.O. Box 723 
Bethel. CT 06801 
We will print and discuss the cleverest, simplest, 
shortest, most interesting and/or unusual solutions. 
Be sure lo identify the name and number of the 
problems you are solving. Also show sample runs if 
possible, where appropriate. 

Your original programming problems would be 
equally welcome! 

Michael Russell (Mattoon, IL) pointed out that the 
simple password program described in the February 
Rupert Report would not be very difficult to break 
into and bypass. Of course, he's right. It was pri- 
marily an example of the non-printing characteristic 
of the GET statement. He asked if there is a way to 
make a program line unlistable. If you know of a 
way to do that, and you don't mind sharing your se- 
cret with the world, write and let us know. 

In the meantime. Marc Spooner (Pembroke. On- 
tario) scnl a more sophisticated protection program. 
That leads us to: 

Problem #9-1: Passed Words 

See how long it takes you to figure the password 
sequence required to be able to run the program 
which starts out with Marc's password protection 
scheme. The protected program would begin at line 
130, and lines similar to line 140 would be sprinkled 
throughout, so you can't just break and GOTO 130 
to bypass the protection. A word of caution: if you 
type this program into your computer, be sure to 
SAVE it before you run it. Otherwise, it may vanish 
before your very eyes! 



1 :REM < COMMODARES #9-1 

2 :REM PASSED WORDS 

3 :REM SUBMITTED BY MARC 
5 :GET 0$ IF 0$<>"" THEN 
10 POKE53281,l:POKE53280 
HR$(144)CHR$(147)CHR$(17)CHR$(17) 
15 INPUT"PAS5W0RD:"; AS 



> 

SPOONER 

5 

1:PRINTC 



20 PR I 

$:Q=Q+ 

25 S$ = 

$ THEN 

30 PRI 

$:Q=Q+ 

35 PRI 

S 

40 

45 

50 

60 

OR 



L=L 
1.= !. 
IF 
IF 
LEF 
NEW 
70 IF 
80 IF 
D$(D$, 
90 GET 
95 GET 
100 Z$ 



NT:PRINT:INPU 

1 

CHR$(82) : IF M 

NEW 
NTrPRINT: INPU 
1 
NT:PRINT: INPU 

EN(A$)+LEN(B$ 
-LEN(D$) :Q=Q+ 
LEN(B$)OL TH 
RIGHT$(A$, 1)< 
TS(BS,l)OMID 



105 
110 

120 
125 



I F 
IF 
IF 
IF 



A$OM 
LEFT$ 

2, 1)< 

V$:I 

X$:I 

v$+x 
z$<> 
v$<> 

QOL 

RIGH 



ID$(D$ ,1 

(CS,1)<> 

>CHRS(65 

F V£="" 

F X$="" 

S:Q=Q+1 

MID$(D$, 

MID$(A$, 

EN(B$)+3 

T$(C$,1) 



T"PASSW0RD:";B 

ID$(B$,3,l)OS 

T"PASSW0RD:";C 

T"PASSW0RD:";D 

)+LEN(CS) 
LEN(D$) 
EN NEW 

>RIGHT$(B$,1) 
$(DS,5,1) THEN 

,4)THEN NEW 
CHR$(77) OR MI 
) THEN NEW 
THEN 90 
THEN 95 

7,2) THEN NEW 
3,1) THEN NEW 

THEN NEW 
<>CHR$(67) THE 



N NEW 

130 PRINT"WELC0ME TO THE PROGRAM! 



140 IF QOLEN(B$) + 3 THEN NEW 

150 :REM PUT STATEMENTS LIKE 

140 THROUGHOUT THE PROGRAM 



LINE 



Problem #9-2: Never Ending 

This problem is based upon a program submitted 
by Haley Carter Jr. (Dayton, OH). Haley usually 
makes the Commodares harder for himself by trying 
to do them in assembly language. This program was 
written in BASIC. 

Without typing it in. see if you can determine 
what will be printed on the screen when this pro- 
gram is run. And yes. line 40 is correct as printed. 
(See the March Rupert Report for a discussion of 
logical variables if this looks strange to you.) Since 
line 10 uses a STEP of 0. will this program ever end? 



10 

1 I 
12 



REM < COMMODARES 
REM NEVER 
REM SUBMITTED BY 



#9-2 : 
ENDING? > 
HALEY CARTER 

AHOY! 47 



JR. 
20 FOR J = TO -1 STEP 
30 N = N + 1 : PRINT N; 
40 J=N=50 : REM YES, J=N=50 
50 NEXT J 
60 END 

Problem #9-3: Common Letters 

The user types two words. The computer then tells 
how many of the letters in the lust word are also 
contained within the second word. For example, if 
the user types "TEST.TAKE", the computer responds 
3 since three of the letters o\' "TEST" are found in 
"TAKE". On the other hand, if the user types 
"TAKE.TEST". the computer responds 2 since only 
two of the letters in "TAKE" are contained in 
"TEST". 

Problem #9-4: Letter Sorter 

The user types a word or sentence, and the com- 
puter prints all the letters, including duplicates, in al- 
phabetical order. For example, typing the sentence 
"COMPUTING IS FUN" would produce the output 
"CFGIIMNNOPSTUU". There will be as many let- 
ters in the output as there are in the original input. 

This month we will look at several readers' solu- 
tions to March and April Commodores. We will wait 
until readers have had a chance to respond to last 
month's problems before we discuss them. 

David Wharton (Gulport. MS) pointed out out that 
spaces and apostrophes prevent the famous palin- 
drome "MADAM I'M ADAM" from being recog- 
nized by the simple palindrome solutions. His pro- 
gram included a test such as in line 20 below to 
eliminate spaces and apostrophes. Line 30 builds two 
strings. AS and BS which are opposiles of each other 
(as seen by the order of the concatenation AS + ZS 
and ZS + BS). II they're equal in line 40. then the 
original string XS is a palindrome. You might modi- 
fy further to eliminate other punctuation. 

5 :REM SOLUTION TO C0MM0DARES 

6 :REM PROBLEM #3-2 : PALINDROMES 

7 :REM SUGGESTED BY DAVID WHARTON 

8 : 

10 PRINT CHR$(147) :INPUT"W0RD OR 

WORDS" ;X$:L=LEN(X$) 

20 ZS=MID$(X$,L,1):IF Z$=" " OR Z 

$ = " "' THEN L = L-1 :G0T0 20 

30 A$=A$+Z$:B$=Z$+BS:L=L-1 :IF L>0 



THEN 20 
40 IF A$=B$ THEN PRINT"THIS IS A 
PALINDROME" 

A purely mathematical solution to Problem #4-1: 
Squared Sum as submitted by Daniel Amodeo (Be- 
ihesda, MD) is shown below. A few other readers 
also used this method of creating numbers digit by 
digit as shown in line 20. Most other solutions used 
strings to build numbers as shown in the May issue 
of Ahoy! 

5 :REM SOLUTION TO PROBLEM #4-1 : 

6 :REM SQUARED SUM 

7 :REM SUBMITTED BY DANIEL AMODEO 

8 : 

10 F0RI=0 TO 4:F0RJ=0 TO 9:F0RK=0 

TO 9 
20 V=100*I + 10* J + K 
30 S=(T+J+K)*(1+J+K) 
40 IF V=S THEN PRINT V 
50 NEXT:NEXT:NEXT 

The solutions of 0. 1. and XI did not require any 
special testing such as IF ABS(V-S) < 1E-4 in line 
40. although it's a good idea to use such a lest for 
larger numbers (see the Rupert Report in the April 
issue of Ahoy!). 

Paul Dawson (Springhousc. PA) sent the following 
program for solving Problem #4-2: Sum of Cubes. 
The interesting thing about this program is that it 
lets you see the activity of the computer by means of 
the <Cursor UP> (CHRS(145)) in line 30. This 
program finds the solutions 0. I. 153. 370. 371. and 
407 also without special testing. 

5 :REM PROBLEM #4-2 : 

6 :REM SUM OF CUBES 

7 :REM SUBMITTED BY PAUL DAWSON 

8 : 

10 FORA=0T09E8:T=0:FORB=2T0LEN(ST 

R$(A)):V=VAL(MID$(STR$(A),B,1)) 

20 T=T+(V*V*V) :NEXT:IFA=TTHENPRIN 

TA"!" 

30 PRINT A ;CHR$(145) :NEXT 

The one-line solution to Problem #4-3: Wrong 
Number from Betty Colgin (Paxton, ME) is listed 
below. She indicates that she has worked with her 
computer for only a month, and thai one reason for 
getting it was to help her "keep up with grandkids." 
Judging from this solution, she has a good start; 



48 AHOY! 



1 INPUT"LETTER";L$ : PRINT L$" IS 

LETTER NUMBER" ASC( L$ )-ASC( "@" ) 
"IN THE ALPHABET" 

Below are three variations on the theme of Prob- 
lem #4-4: Random Repetition. Christopher Hebert 
(Sunnyvale. CA) mentioned that line 10 in his solu- 
tion is a speedy way to fill the screen color memory 
with a value of 0. Clearing the screen on the C-64 
(PRINT CHRS047)) fills color memory which re- 
sides from 55296 to 56295 with whatever value is 
stored in location 53281. This is much faster than 
the FOR- NEXT loop: 



FOR M=55296 TO 56295 
NEXT 



POKE M,0 



which does the same thing. Christopher and several 
other readers used the fact that a reversed character 
has a CHRS value which is 128 greater than its non- 
reversed counterpart: 



REM SOLUTION TO PROBLEM #4-4 
REM RANDOM REPETITION 
REM SUBMITTED BY CHRISTOPHER 



EBERT 

8 : 

10 P0KE53 281 , : PRINTCHR$ ( 147 ) : POK 

E53281.1 

20 FOR J-1024 TO 2023: Q=INT(RND( 

0)*10)+48:P0KE J,Q 

30 IFQ=C THEN P0KEJ-1 , Q+128 : POKE 

J.Q+128 

40 C=Q:NEXT 

Paul Dawson (Springhousc. PA) took the problem 
one step further. He changed any two matching char- 
acters, either horizontally or vertically, to reverse 
video with the program shown below. 

4 : 

5 :REM PROBLEM #4-4 : RANDOM REPE 
TITI0N 

6 :REM SUBMITTED BY PAUL DAWSON 

7 : 

10 POKE 53281 , 1 :PRINT CHR$(147):P 

0KE 53281,6 

20 F0RA=1024T02023:B=INT(RND(I)*1 

0)+48:P0KEA,B 

30 F0RX=1T040STEP3 9:IFPEEK(A-X)=B 

0RPEEK(A-X)=B+128THENP0KEA-X,B+12 

8:P0KEA,B+128 

40 NEXTX,A:WAIT197,1 



The WAIT statement at the end of his program halts 
the program until a key is pressed. (A problem for 
you experts is to figure out which keys will work 
with this statement.) The "current key pressed" buf- 
fer is at address 197. It is a handy way to keep the 
READY prompt from cluttering up your display until 
you're ready for it. 

A third variation on Problem tt4-4 is shown below 
from Mark Nekic (Eastlake. OH). Mark's solution 
exemplifies logical variables. The variable T is if 
the previous number does not equal the current one. 
and it is I if the two numbers are equal. This vari- 
able is used to determine whether to print two num- 
bers in reverse video or to print only one regular 
number. You can figure out how this program works 
if you use some elues from the ASCII and CHRS 
Codes appendix at the back of your user's manual or 
your programmer's reference guide. 



5 
6 

7 



REM SOLUTION TO PROBLEM #4-4 
REM RANDOM REPETITION 
REM SUBMITTED BY MARK NEKIC 



10 L=X:X=INT(RND(1)*10) :T=-(L=X) : 

B$=CHR$(T*157)+CHR$(T*18) 

20 A$=B$+B$+CHR$(T*(L+48)) 

30 PRINT A$;X;CHR$(146); : GOTO 10 

Brian Dobbs (Timmins, Ontario) sent the following 
Low Resolution Copy program for sending los-res 
graphics screens to the VIC-1525 printer. He says 
that it eliminates the space on the printout normally 
produced by carriage returns. If anyone else has rea- 
sonably short, useful utilities, this is the place to 
share them. Thanks, Brian. 



REM < LOW RES SCREEN COPY 
REM TO VIC-1525 PRINTER > 

REM SUBMITTED BY BRIAN DOBBS 



5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

100 SI$=CHR$(15) :BS$=CHR$(8) :D=10 

24:0PEN4,4 

110 FOR A=D TO D+39 

120 PRINT#4,SI$; 

130 B=PEEK(A) 

140 IF B>-1 AND B<32 THEN E$=CHR$ 

(B+64) 

150 IF B>31 AND B<64 THEN E$=CHR$ 

(B) 

160 IF B>63 AND B<96 THEN E$=CHR$ 

(B+32) 

Continued on page 76 

AHOY! 49 




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Reader Service No. 166 



3-84 



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i 



i a i 

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® SANYO MONITOR SALE!! 




9" Data Monitor 



80 Columns x 24 lines 
Green text display 
Easy to read - no eye strain 
Up front brightness control 
High resolution graphics 
Quick start - no preheating 
Regulated power supply 
Attractive metal cabinet 
UL and FCC approved 



15 Day Free Trial - 90 Day Immediate Replacement Warranty 



^ 



9" Screen - Green Text Display 
12" Screen - Green Text Display (anti-reflective screen) 
12" Screen -Amber Text Display (anti-reflective screen) 
12" Screen-Super 1000 Line Amber Text Display 

14" Screen -Color Monitor (High Resolution) 
Display Monitors From Sanyo 

With the need for computing power growing every day. Sanyo has 
stepped in to meet the demand with a whole new line of low cost, high 
quality data monitors. Designed for commercial and personal com- 
puter use. All models come with an array of features, including up- 
front brightness and contrast controls. The capacity 5x7 dot 
characters as the input is 24 lines of characters with up to 
80 characters per line. 

Equally important, all are built with Sanyo's commitment 
to technological excellence. In the world of Audio/Video, Sanyo is 
synonymous with reliability and performance. And Sanyo quality is 
reflected in our reputation. Unlike some suppliers, Sanyo designs, 
manufactures and tests virtually all the parts that go into our products, 
from cameras to stereos. That's an assurance not everybody can 
give you! 



$ 69.00 
$ 99.00 
$ 99.00 

$119.00 
$239.00 



Offioal Video Products 
of the Los Angeies 1984 Ofymptcs 



Q§® 






• LOWEST PRICES* 15 DAY FREE TRIAL- 90 DAY FREE REPLACEMENT WARRANTY 
• BEST SERVICE IN U.S.A.* ONE DAY EXPRESS MAIL* OVER 500 PROGRAMS • FREE CATALOGS 



3 



I Add $10.00 lor shipping, handling and Insurance. Illinois residents 1 

| please add 6% lax. Add S20.00 lor CANADA, PUERTO RICO, HAWAII | 

j orders. WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES. 

| Enclose Cashiers Check. Money Order or Personal Check. Allow 14 j 

| days for delivery. 2 to 7 days lor phone orders, 1 day express mail! j 

I Canada orders must be in u S dollars Visa ■ MasterCard ■ OO.O. 



f wnrERPRi Es |weloveourcustomers > 

BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS 60010 
Phone 3127382-5244 to order 



R*flH*r R* 




COMMODORE-64 or VIC-20 

VOICE SYNTHESIZER 



MAKE YOUR 
COMPUTER TALK 




VOTRAX BASED 
HARDWARE 



SALE 



s 



ONLY 



59 



00 



You can program any words or sentences • Adjust volume and pitch • Make adven- 
ture games that talk • Real sound action games • Make customized talkies • (Demo 
disk or tape included) • Requires Speaker 



You can add TEXT TO SPEECH SOFTWARE that allows you to simply type what you 
want to hear!! Also allows you to add sound and voice to SCOTT ADAMS AARD- 
VARK and "ZORK" ADVENTURE GAMES List $29.95 Sale $19.95 (Disk or Tape). 

iBQOQO QO OQQQO Q OQOOOeoOQQeQQ Q OOO OQO QQOa 



• LOWEST PRICES * 15 DAY FREE TRIAL • 90 DAY FREE REPLACEMENT WARRANTY 
•BEST SERVICE IN U.S.A. • ONE DAY EXPRESS MAIL • OVER 500 PROGRAMS • FREE CATALOGS 



COMMODORE 64 

80 COLUMN BOARD 



SALE 



$ 



FOR ONLY 



99 



00 



Now you can program 80 columns on the screen 
jat one time! Converts your Commodore 64 to 80 
columns when you plug in the PROTECTO 80 
Expansion Board. List $199.00. Sale S99.00. 



FOR ONLY $24.95 you can get an 80 Column Board 
terminal emulator PLUS! AN ELECTRONIC SPREAD 
"If purchased with board only $24.95. (Tape or Disk.) 




Add $3.00 for shipping, handling and insurance. Illinois residents 
please add 6% tax. Add $6.00 for CANADA. PUERTO RICO. HAWAII. 
ALASKA APO-FPO orders. Canadian orders must be in U.S. dollars. 
WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Enclose Cashiers Check. Money Order or Personal Check. Allow 14 
days for delivery. 2 to 7 days for phone orders. I doy express mail ! 
VISA — MASTER CARD - C.O.D. 

No C.O.D. to Canada, APO-FPO. 



WORD PROCESSOR" with mail merge and 
SHEET (like Visicalc) List $59.00. Sale $39.90. 

WE LOVE OUR CUSTOMERS 



CK|TCDpD|7FS (WE LOVEOUB CUSTOMED 

BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS (50010 
Phone 312/3S2-5244 to ordtr 



Reader Service No. 154 



Sale 

$39.95 

List $69.00 



Program Your Commodore 64 
In Plain English 

(No need to know Basic) 

CodeWriter 



New 

Program 

Generators!! 



Information cann be a wonderful thing. Having enough of it when it's needed can save lime and money and 
give you that very nice "together" feeling. FileWriter lets you control information so you can enter it, find it 
and change it — just the way you'd like. Whether it's information about bills, taxes, recipes, club 
membership, stamp collections, or your new home business, FileWriter puts things in order. Simply "draw" 
any kind of screen you want — just like making up a paper form to hold information. Only there's no paper to 
slow things down. Once you have your form, add some real computer power: calculate automatically, hold 
grand totals, test for bad information — for one form or hundreds. There's no need to "program". Just use 
plain English! ! Most of the instructions you'll need are right on the screen for you. Like all CodeWriter 
programs, your FileWriter system gives you your own program on your own disk — in minutes the first time 
you try. Your new program will search for information any way you'd like, update old information, make new 
calculations, oil at computer speed. 



Program Generators!! 



Report Writer — Lets you create 
output formats and calculations in 
any fashion you please. Requires 
FileWriter. List S59.00. Sale S39.95. 

(Disk). 




Adventure Writer — Now you can 

create your own Adventure game 
without knowing how to program! 
Create heroes, villains, magicians 
ond monsters, castles and coffin, 
even dragons. All in plain English. 
When your creation is done 
Adventure Writer will write the 
program for you on your own disk. 
Fantastic Adventure tool! List $59.00. 
Sale $39.95. (Disk). 




FileWriter — Lets you create the 
input screens and calculations in any 
fashion you please. List S59.00. Sale 
S39.95. (Disk). 




Elf — The visible worksheet is here! 
Now you can create applications 
screen by screen that calculates and 
prints out reports. Buy vs. lease, 
amortization, comparisons, and 
summations are just a few of the 
freeform spreadsheet functions you 
can do with Elf. List $59.00. Sale 
$39.00. (Disk). 



Dialog — Now you can make quizzes 
and problems for your kids and 
friends. Make trivia games and other 
question and answer games for all. 
You pick the rewards and the 
punishments. Fantastic teaching aid 
for kids and party game maker for 
adults. List $59.00. Sale J39.95. 
(Disk). 



Add S3 00 for ihippinfl, handling and migrant* Illinois rtudtnri 
bImh odd 6% lax Add 16 00 tor CANADA PUERTO RICO HAWAII 
ALASKA APO FPO ord*fi Canadian ard*ri mull b* in U S dallan 
WS DO NOI EXPORT FO OTHER COUNTRIES 

£ndo»» Caihi«n Ch»ck Man«y Ord»r 01 P#r»onol Cn»ck. Allow 14 
day* for d»liv#ry 2 ta 7 dayi lor phon* ord*ri. I day axprsn mail ! 

VISA — MASTER CARD - COD. 
NoC.O.D lo Canada APOFPO 



FMTPf|pR| 'ES lkVEi0Vf 0UBCU5TOMERSI 

BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS 60010 
Prion* 312/342-5244 to orctar 



R»d*r S*rvlc* No. 1SS 



The Most 

Practical Software 

For Your 

Commodore-64 




• Track Expenses, inventories, 
investments • Make Charts 
and Graphs • Project Profits 



• Keep Mailing Lists • Change 
Records, numbers, methods of 
filing • Information Retrieval 




• Test RAM Memory • RS-232 
Port • Keyboard • Video • 
Audio • Joystick • And More! 




Practicalc 64: A consistent 
best seller, Practicalc 64 has 
become a reference standard 
among Commodore 64 
spreadsheets. With features 
like alphabetic and numeric 
sorting and searching, variable 
comumn widths, graphing and 
23 math functions, this 
program is an exceptional 
value. Practicalc 64 also 
interacts with Practifile, 
forming the perfect small 
business bundle. List $59.95. 
Sale $46.95. Disk. ($39.95 
Tape.) 




Practifile: Flexibility and 
large capacity make Practifile 
the ideal data-base manager 
for the Commodore 64. Files 
written with the program are 
compatible with Practicalc 64 
and popular word processing 
programs such as EasyScript, 
Word Pro, PageMate and 
PaperClip. Finally, a full- 
featured data-base at an 
affordable price! List $59.95. 



Sale 

Tape.) 



Disk. {$39.95 



Add S3. 00 for shipping handling and insurance Illinois ftudinn 
please add 6% fan Add 44 00 for CANADA. PUERTO RICO HAWAII 
ALASKA APO FPO orders Canadian order* must be in US dollar* 
WF. DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Enclose Cashiers Ch#c« Money Order or Personal Check. Allow f4 
days for delivery 2 to 7 dayi for phone orders I day express mail' 
VISA - MASTER-CARD - COO. 

Nn C O D is Canada. APO-FPO 




64 Doctor: A special diagnostic 
program for the Commodore 
64, 64 Doctor takes the 
guesswork out of isolating 
troublesome hardware 
problems. The program tests 
each piece of hardware to 
pinpoint defects and help 
prevent costly and time- 
consuming service calls. An 
essential program for all 
Commodore 64 users! List 
$34.95. Sale 524.95. ($19.95 
Disk.) 



.WE LOVE OUR CUSTOMERS: 



ENTERPRIZES 

BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS 60010 
Phon* 312/382-5244 to order 



Reader Service No. 156 



FUTUREHOUSE 



Introductory Offer! 

Complete Personal Accountant 
"Three Programs for the Price of One" 

CHECKBOOK • BUDGET MANAGER - BILL PAYER 
This program has become the most popular Commodore-64 program for money management 
in the home and in small businesses. Much more than a record keeper the complete personal 
accountant helps you plan, budget, monitor, and record your finances and your time. Chart of 
Accounts; Detail and Summary Budget Analysis; and Appointments Payments Calendar are 
yours for one low price. List S79.00. Sale $49.00. Introductory Offer 



r 



:H 






Organize and monitor your finances with 
a flexible Chart of Accounts, ond an 
option packed Checkbook Maintenance 
program. Only the CPA offers on-screen 
editing for quick ond easy corrections 
check search capabilities in each field 
and the capacity to print personalized 
checks. 




* mm >n wmm..jfL:»$ 



mm*' niama'-ifjj 




With Detail ano Summary Budget 
Analysis and Net 

Worth Income Expense Statements you 
can easily determine where your money 
is where it's going and where it s coming 
from Finance 7 will automatically 
generote professional reports that ore 
indispensable tools in making financial 
decisions. 



With the Appointments ond Payments 
Calendar you can schedule and then 
monitor your time and your money ... or 
graphically display your finances with the 
Color Graph program. Extra features le' 
you organize names and addresses with 
our powerful Mailing List that features o 
globol search capability. 



mi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi 11 iiiii nun iiiniiiu iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiniimiinii 

Fantastic Educational Programs 



Little Red Riding Hood 

TALKS! 1 This famous bedtime 

story comes olive withgraphics. 
sound, text and SPEECH! Now you 
and your kids can relive the Story of 
Little Red Riding Hood and improve 
your reading skills at the same 
time. Excellent for all ages!! List" 
S34.95. Sale S24. 95 (Disk). 







:..\*x,k.*>t. 










. mm wmm 






i 



Peripheral Vision At last a 

fantastic artists program for your 
light pen. Draw, erase and save in 
14 colors. Zoom in and out, draw or 
fill circles, squares, triangles, or 
rectangles with the touch o) a pen. 
Fantastic graphics tool. List S39.95. 
Sale S27.95 [Requires light pen). 



Animal Crackers — This 

program helps develop letter 

and word recognition skills by 

creating a screen full of 

animated objects, each 

representing a letter of the 

alphabet. Your child selects a 

letter with the joystick or light 

pen and suddenly an animal or 

object will appear with the correct spelling. List S34.95. 

Sale S24.95 (Light pen or joystick required) (Disk). 




Add S3 00 tor shipping handling and iniufond Illinois ie+*d*nis 
plMu add 4". lo« *dd to DO tor CANADA PUERTO RICO HAWAII 
AlASKA APOF-POod.il Canadian orders muti be m U S dollar! 
WI DO NOt f XPORT TO QTHIR COUNTRI6S 

Enclose oshieis Check Monty Order or Perianal ' Im. ■ Allow M 
day* lof delivery 1 in r doys tor prion* aiders I day •■press moil 1 
VISA MASTfftCACD -COD 

NoCOD la Canada APO FPO 



draws 
correc 
S24.« 



\ Alphabet Construction Set — 

This is the most Advanced 

Alphabet Construction Set on 

record. The computer voice {it 

speaks) guides your child 

through every step as he/she 

draws the letter on the screen 

with a light pen. The computer 

analyzes the letters your child 

points out mistokes ond then suggests the necessary 

lions! Fantastic Educational Value. List S34.95. Sale 

(Light pen required) (Disk). 





FNTERPRIZES *■> ..•.."•■■ ■■»<-■ 

BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS 6O010 
Phont 312/342 5244 to order 



Heeder Servlc* No. 157 



Commodore 64 

No. 1 

Educational Software 

At Its Best 



The 




Company $ALE! 



• BETTER THAN SPINAKER!! 



\^0y 




Bumble Games — Ages 4-10. An 
absolutely outerspace way to teach 
basic math to children. Flying spaceships 
and the magic of Bumble help children 
learn to plot numbers and create 
computer graphics. 
List $44.95. Sale $29.95. Coupon $24,95 



Moptown Hotel — Ages 8-13. To learn 
how to solve problems, check into this 
hotel. Children learn advanced 
problem-solving skills. Colorful Moppet 
characters open the door to learning. 
List S44.95. Sale $29.95. Coupon $24.95 





Addition Magician — Ages 6-10. An 
absent-minded magician makes a game 
out of learning addition. Magical walls 
and secret prizes encourage flexible 
thinking about adding. Children become 
addition magicians! 
List S39.95. Sale $29.95. Coupon $24.95 



Moptown Parade — Ages 6-10. To 
learn strategy, this is ihe parade to join. 
Playful Moppet characters help children 
develop strategic thinking. Children will 
never wont this parade to pass them by, 
List $44,95. Sale $29.95. Coupon $24.95 





Word Spinner — Ages 610. Reading 
becomes like a ride in an amusement 
pork as children spin through the 
alphabet and learn to read. With 
brilliant colors and a whirling word 
spinner ihe building blocks of reading 
are made easy. List $39.95. Sale $29.95. 
Coupon $24.95 



Add S3 00 for shipping handling and insurance, Illinois residents 
please add 6". (a* Add S6 00 for CANADA, PUERTO RICO HAWAII 
AlASKA, APO-FPO orders. Canadian orders must be in U S dollors 
WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES 

Enclose Cashiers Check. Money Order or Personal Check, Allow 14 
days for delivery 2 to 7 days tor phone orders 1 doy express mail ! 
VISA — MASTER CARD — CO D 

No CO 0. loConodo APO FPO 



Juggles' Rainbow — Ages 3-6. Little 
ones play over and over again with 
dancing rainbows, whirling windmills 
and fluttering butterflies. Children learn 
the spatial concepts of above and below, 
left and right — and other critical 
reading and math readiness skills. 
List $34.95. Sale $29.95. Coupon $24.95 




C|U"rCpppi7pC (WE LOVE OUR CUSTOMERS! 

BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS 00010 
Phone 312yM2 5244 to nrrf-r 



Reader Service No, 158 



Turn Your 
Commodore-64 Into 

A Sophisticated 
Musical Instrument 



v 



u The Program That Gives You A Reason To Buy A Commodore-Si^. 

New York Times. 




MusiCalc 



S0hesizer\i Sequencer 



MusiCalc 



/ tanjttr 



ScoreWriter 

Combine with Musicalc 1 and a 
graphics printer (Super-10) to 
produce sheet music from your 
original composition. List 
$39.95. Sale $29.95. Coupon 
S24.95. 



Synthesizer & Sequencer 

This 1st step turn your Commodore-64 into a 
sophisticated musical instrument — a three 
voice synthesizer and fully interactive step 
sequencer play along with pre-recorded 
songs or develop your own and record the 
music you create. 

List $59.95. Sale $39.95. 

With Musicalc anyone can • Make 
and record sophisticated music • 
Print out sheet music from your 
creations • Turn your computer into 
a keyboard • No experience 
necessary! 




MusOk 



/ km* me 



Keyboard Maker 

Turns your Commodore-64 into a 
musical keyboard. Comes with 
over 30 pre-set keyboard scales 
from Classical to Rock. Requires 
Musicalc 1. List $39.95. Sale 
$29.95. Coupon $24.95. 



You will sound great with Musicalc. To prove it we will send you FREE a record with 
sounds created with a Commodore-64 and Musicalc by people without instrument or 
musical experience. To get your Free Record write or call 312/382-5244. 



Add S3. 00 for shipping, handling and insurance. Illinois residents 
please add 67. lax. Add S6.00 tor CANADA. PUERTO RICO. HAWAII 
ALASKA, APO-FPO ordarv Canadion orders mull be in U S dollars 
WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Enclose Cashiers Check Monty Order or Personal Check. Allow 14 
dayt lor delivery 2 to 7 days for phone ofders. 1 day express mail ! 

VISA — MASTER CARD — COD. 
NoC.O.D.IoCanado, APO-FPO 



BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS 90010 
Phont 312/382-5244 to order 



Rudir Service No. 159 



COMMODORE-64 



CHALK BOARD 

COLOR TOUCH TABLET 



Chalk Board Touch-Tablet is a 

revolutionary new 12" x 12" touch sensitive 
surface that lets you bypass your 
COMMODORE-64 Computer keyboard. Just 
touch the pad and watch your ideas appear 
on your t.v, screen in living color! Power Pad 
is drawing pad, color graphics, color canvas 
and piano keyboard, jigsaw puzzle, game 
board for any age. A fantastic, entertaining, 
learning experience! • Free $29.95 Paint 
Brush Program! 



List Price $129.90 



Sale $49.00 




LEARNING PAD SALEM ! 



• Bigger — Better — Lower Price Than Koalapad! • Fantastic Learning Tool • First Graders To Senior 
Citizens • Learn By Touching Tablet • Color Graphics • Drawing Pad • Game Board • Jigsaw Puzzle 

• Piano Key Board • Music* Visual Arts • Moth • Science* Apple (Macintosh) Mouse Capability 



LEO'S LECTRIC PAINT BRUSH. When 
you use Leo's Lecfric Paintbrush 
software, you are ready for magical, 
mul I i-colored electronic finger 
painting. Make your own pictures. 
Color them. Change them. Save 
them. List $29.95. Sale (Free with 
purchase of CHALKBOARD 
LEARNING PAD for $49.00) . (Cart) 



BEARJAM. As children play this 
gome and feed the friendly animated 
bear, ihey sharpen the visual skills so 
essential for success in learing. 
BearJam is a great reading-readiness 
game. List $39,95. Sale S29.95. (Cart) 



LEARNING PAD PROGRAMMING 
KIT. Once you're fomiliar with the 
COMMODORE-64 Computer keyboard 
and you understand beginning BASIC, 
the LEARNING PAD programming kit 
sets you free to develop games ond 
programs! List $29.95. Sale *19.95. 
(Disk) 



PIANO MAESTRO. Chalk Board's 
MicroMaestro software turns your 
PowerPad into a piano keyboard. 
Touch the keys. You hear the music 
and see your composition right on the 
screen. It is the fun way to learn 
music. List $29.95. Sale *24.95 (Cart) 



LOGICMASTER. With over 180,000 
different game designs ... and over 
200 million secret codes 
LogicMasler is the most fun you've 
ever had with your powers of 
reasoning. Solve the codes all by 
yourself or work together with family 
or friends. List $39.95. Sale S29.95 
(Cart) 



LEO'S GOLF LINKS. This golf game 
for one or more players lets you 
design each hole, including fairways, 
roughs, traps and greens. Then using 
woods, irons ond putters, you play 
the course. List $39.95. Sale *29.93. 
(Cart) 



Add S3. 00 for shipping, handling and insurance. Illinois residents 
pleose odd 6% lax. Add S6.00 tot CANADA, PUERTO RICO. HAWAII. 
ALASKA. APO-FPO orders. Canadian orders must be in U.S. dollars 
WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES 

Enclose Cashiers Check. Money Order or Personal Check. Allow 14 
days lor delivery, 2 to 7 days lor phone orders. 1 day express -nail 
VISA — MASTER CARD — C.O.D. 

No C.O.D. to Canada. APO-FPO, 



CK|TCQpD|7CC [WE LOVE OUR CUSTOMERS) 

BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS 60010 
Phont 312/382-5244 to erder 



Rteder Service No. 160 




Program Offer* 

TIMEWORKS 



Home Management 
Educational Software 



Presidential Campaign 

Start with 52,500,000 and o Presidential 
Nomination. Spend your money wisely to 
conduct a nationwide campaign to win the 
confidence of the American Public. At the end of 
the campaign the American Public will decide 
on the final decision. Fantastically Realistic. List 
S29.95. Sale $19.95 



Money Manager 

16 categories can be input on a monthly 
basis for o 12 month period. Full analysis 
including budget and actual comparisons 
plus detail by individual items. Colorful bar 
chorts show where you're spending to much 
or too little. Record all information to tape 
or disk. List S24.95. Sale $19.95. 





* Buy the Fantastic Presidential 
Campaign and choose any other 
Timeworks Program on this 

page FREEH 

Tape or Disk 
Expires 10/1/84 
The Electronic Checkbook 

Check recording, sorting and balancing 
system. Organize and record checkbook 
transactions for easy recall and sorting by 
category. A must for tax time. Also produce 
the sum and average for transaction 
amounts by indexed categories. Interface 
with the MONEY MANAGER for graphic 
detail and actual-budget comparison. List 
S24.95. SaleS19.95. 




Your Choice 

$19.95 



Programming Kit II 

Intermediate game 
design and Sprite 
Builder. Design Slot 
Machine and study 
intermediate 
programming including 
arrays, subroutines, 
sound, special function 
keys, and random 
function. Plus Sprites are 
detail and a Sprite Editor 
List S24.95 Sale $19.95 



Learn Basic 
Programming from 
the ground up. This 
first step takes you 
through the actual 
design of Lunar 
Lander, using 
moving graphics. 



Programming Kit I 

Shows in detail how 
basic programming 



TITKUJCRtS. 

Programming 
Kit!. 



m 



works 
should 
good 
S24.95. 



and what 

go into a 

game. List 

Sale $19.95. 



Your Choice 

$19.95 




Programming 
Kits 

Manuals are written in 

plain, easy to follow English. 

The 8 step approach to program 

design is fully explained and can 

easily be opplied to your future 

programming adventures. 



covered in 
s included. 



Programming Kit III 

Intermediate Data Base 
design . Instead of 
games you may want to 
go the business route. 
Use this program to 
develop a Data Base 
Manager to allow quick 
storage and retrieval of 
any information. Learn 
disk tape storage, sorting, menus, 
plus multi dimensioned arrays, 
plus a whole lot more. List $24.95. 
Sale $19.95. 




TtmOJUCRf<S 

Twutnni ■** 
niqrlirii Tni(|DiKi 

lilt ....... 



Dungeons Of The Algebra Dragons 

At last a good educational game. You 
must wander through 3-D mazes until you 
encounter dragons, then you must 
answer the algebra problems they give 
you. A right answer gets you a free ride, 
a wrong answer gets you eaten. Fantastic 
educational value. (Tape or Disk.) List 
$29.95. Sale $24.95. 



Spellbound 

The screen is sprinkled with the letters 
from one of 20 words of your choice along 
with a few extra random ones. Use your 
Joystick to sting the letters in the right 
order but don't sting the wrong ones or 
cross your path or you explode. Fantastic 
educational value. Fun for all ages. List 
S24.95 Sale $17.95. 




Add $3 00 for shipping handling and njvfonc* lllinoii residents 
plMi. odd 6'-. Ia> Add *4 00 loi CANADA PUERTO RICO HAWAII 
ALASKA APO fPO orders Conodion O'de'S moil h* in U S dollori 
WE DO NOl EXPORT TO 01HER COUNTRIES 
Indole Cashiers CH.ck Monty Old*' or Personal Ch.ck Alfov* 14 

dOy» Inr d.liv.r * "2 *Q 7 dOf S lo' phone orders ' -3Q* • ■ p- m\: ■ z 

VISA MASTER CARD -COD 

NoCOO loCofiodo APO-FPO 



Reader Service No. 161 



ENTERPRI ^ES ■ vE -° vi ^"customers 

BOX 5S0. BARRINGTON. ILLINOIS 60010 
Prion* 312/3*2 5244 to order 



Commodore 64 




screenplay 

Superior Computer Games 



Pogo Joe 

Better than Qbert. 
Guide Pogo Joe across 
32 screens of cylinders. 
As many as 8 nasties at 
a time are out to kill 
you. Fantastic graphics 
and sound. List $29.95. 
Sale $19.95. Coupon 

$16.95. (Tape or Disk) 
•GAME OF THE YEAR! 





Dunzhin 

A good sword, little 
magic, and lots of 
cunning takes you 
against Evil Wyverns, 
Saber Toothed Tigers, 
and the Undead. If you 
reach the bottom of the 
dungeon your halfway 
home. Great and 30 
graphics. List $34.95. 
Sale $24.95. Coupon 

$22.00. (Tope or Disk) 



Playful Professor 



Make your way to the 
treasure by correctly 
answering moth problems. 
If you guess wrong and the 
professor shows you how 
step by step. Addition, 
substraction, 
multiplication, and division 
basics are all covered. 
Fantastic educational 
value. List $34/95. Sale 
$24.95. Coupon $22.00. 

(Tope or Disk) 






' Y 

, ,,. :■ 

j ■?< 






J ,,• 



Wcpi 



I P. 




Add $3.00 for shipping handling and insurance Illinois residents 
please add b\ lax. Add S6 00 far CANADA PUERTO RICO HAWAII. 
ALASKA APOFPO orders. Canadian orders must be In U.S. dollars 
WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Enclose Cashiers Check, Money Order or Personal Check. Allow 14 
days lar delivery 2 la 7 days lor phone orders 1 doy express moil ' 
VISA - MASTER CARD — COD 

NoC.O.D. to Canada APO FPO 


















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Reader Service No. 165 



RUPISRT KliPCR! 



VIDEO RAM 

LOOKING AT THE SCREEN'S 

MEMORY 



BY DALE RUPERT 



This month we will examine the video dis- 
play and its associated memory locations. 
If your time is limited, take this quick 

quiz to determine whether you need to 

read any further into this article: 
1. How arc the following statements similar? 



A) POKE 1024,1 

B) PRINT CHR$(19)CHR$(65) 

C) POKE 53272,23 : POKE 1024 



65 



2. If PEEK(55296)=2, what color is the character 
that is in the upper left corner of the screen? 

3. Which statement would put a reverse-video "9" 
on the screen? 

A) PRINT "(RV) 9" 

B) POKE 2000,57+128 

C) PRINT CHR$(18)CHR$(57) 

Now check your answers carefully. All three state- 
ments in question 1 will put the letter "A" in the up- 
per left corner of the screen, sometimes. B) always 
works. A) and C) work depending upon the value in 
the corresponding color memory location 55296. (Be 
generous with the partial credit.) 

If the statement in question 2 is correct, you can 
be sure that the character there is red. if there is one 
there. On the other hand, the character may be red 
and PEEK(55296) may have a completely different 
value. Confusing, isn't it? 

The answer to question 3 is that A) and C) will 
always display a reverse-video "9", and B) will 
sometimes, depending upon the values in locations 
53272 and 56272. 

If you got all problems correct, congratulations, 
and so long. See you' next month. 

If all this stuff is confusing beyond comprehen- 

70 AHOY! 



sion, welcome! After studying this article, you will 
be able not only to understand the video and color 
memory, but to manipulate it as well. It's really not 
nearly as incomprehensible as the answers to the lit- 
tle quiz implied. 

SCREEN COORDINATES 

To begin, let's look at the way the video display is 
organized. Although we'll be dealing with the Com- 
modore 64. most of the concepts (but not the num- 
bers) also apply to the VIC 20. It will be helpful if 
you get your C-64 User's Guide and turn to Appen- 
dix G or your C-64 Programmer's Reference Guide 
and turn to Appendix D. The screen memory map 
also shows a 40 by 25 matrix of cells. The cells are 
numbered sequentially 1024 through 2023 from up- 
per left to lower right. 

There is a memory location at address 1024 in 
RAM which stores one 8-bit byte. Whatever is in 
that memory cell is interpreted by the computer to 
be the code for a character which is to be displayed 
on the screen. For example, if there is a I in ad- 
dress 1024, there will also be a letter "A" in the up- 
per left hand corner of your screen. 

Want to see for yourself? Press < SHIFT > and 
<CLR/HOME> simultaneously to clear the screen. 
Move the cursor down a few lines with the <CRSR 
DN > key. Then type POKE 1024,1 and press 

< RETURN > . What you have done is put a num- 
ber 1 into the memory at address 1024. Do you see 
the "A" in the upper left corner? You don't? Try 
moving the cursor up to the corner with the 

< SHIFT > and <CRSR UP> keys. Now you 
should see an "A" flashing with the cursor. 

What happened is that we put an "A" up there all 
right, but it had the same color as the background 
so it was invisible. The cursor changed the character 
to its reverse-video image and made it momentarily 



visible. So we now know how to put invisible char- 
acters on the screen. Could you put an "A" in the 
lower right-hand corner? POKE 2023,1 should work. 
Be careful when you move the cursor down to look 
at it that the screen doesn't scroll. If it does, you'll 
find an invisible "A" somewhere above that corner. 

Notice on your screen memory map that the start 
of each row on the screen has a memory value 
which is 40 greater than the value of the row above 
it. The last cell in the top row of the screen has an 
address of 1063, and address 1064 is the first cell in 
the second row on the screen. The cell directly be- 
low 1063 is (1063 + 40) or 1103. 

We can't do very much with invisible characters, 
SO let's make them visible. Associated with each 
screen memory cell is a corresponding color mem- 
ory cell. Look at the color memory map in your 
book. The grid is identical in shape and size to the 
one for screen memory. The only difference between 
the two is the numbering. You may put a number 
from to 15 into the color memory cells which cor- 
responds to the color of the character which will ap- 
pear in each cell. 

Press <RUN/STOP> and <RESTORE> togeth- 
er to produce the default colors on your display. 
Clear your screen and move the cursor down a few 
rows. Enter the statement 

POKE -55296,0 

Did the upper left corner of your screen turn black? 
No? Try also typing 

POKE 1024,1 

Now you should see a black "A" in the upper left 
corner. 

The color memory and the screen memory work 
together. The character in each screen location is 
displayed in the color as specified by the corre- 
sponding color memory value. If you now type 

POKE 55296,1 

you should see a white "A". The values of the colors 
are listed above the color memory map in your ref- 
erence book. 

To put a red "A" in the lower left corner of the 
screen, type 

POKE 1984,1 : POKE 56256,2 



determine the value to POKE if we want something 
besides the letter "A". That's where the Screen Dis- 
play Codes appendix in your reference book conies 
in handy (Appendix E in the User's Guide and Ap- 
pendix B in the Programmer's Reference Guide.) 

There are two sets of screen codes and their 
POKE values listed in that table. Set 1 and Set 2. 
When you turn your computer on. Set 1 characters 
are automatically selected. If you press the 
< SHIFT > and < COMMODORE > keys simultan- 
eously, you can toggle over to Set 2 or back again. 
All the letters on your screen change to lower case 
when Set 2 is selected. 

You should be able to see from this table where 
the value of 1 for the letter "A" came from. If you 
had POKEd a 2 into address 1024, you would have 
seen a "B". POKE a 94 into address 1024 (POKE 
1024,94) and you should see the pi symbol. Now 
press the < SHIFT > and < COMMODORE > keys 
and the pi becomes a checkerboard pattern. You will 
be able to find both symbols in the Screen Codes ta- 
ble of your book. 

It is easy enough to change from one character set 
to another from the keyboard, but how about from 
within a program? That is also very easy. If you 
want to select Set 1, simply use the statement POKE 
53272,21 and to switch to Set 2, use POKE 53272,23. 
With the pi in the upper corner of the screen, type 
POKE 53272,23 and see that it changes. 

Now you should be able to understand parts A) 
and C) of question 1 in the quiz. Not really that dif- 
ficult after all! In C) we simply selected Set 2 and 
put character 65 (which is an "A") into location 
1024. Question 2 should be reasonably obvious also. 
Since location 55296 is the color memory location 
for the upper left corner of the screen, and since 2 
is the code for the color red, a character in that po- 
sition will be red. 

Answer 3 C) to the quiz should look somewhat fa- 
miliar. Address 2000 is in the screen memory map 
on the bottom row. A note at the end of the Screen 
Display Codes appendix indicates that reverse-video 
characters have a value which is 128 greater than the 
normal-video characters. Consequently POKE 
2000,57 + 128 puts a reverse-video version of charac- 
ter number 57 (a "9") on the bottom row of the 
screen, assuming Set 1 is selected. 

SOME ACTION 

Enough talk. How about some action! Let's put a 
whole row of characters on the screen. Try this: 



About the only thing we haven't covered is how to 5 PRINT CHR$ ( 147 ) 



AHOY! 71 



10 UL=1024 : UR=1063 

20 FOR SM=UL TO UR 

30 POKE SM,1 

40 POKE SM+54272,0 

50 NEXT 

Line 5 clears the screen. Line 10 defines the Upper 
Left and Upper Right screen memory addresses. The 
FOR-NEXT loop in lines 20-50 POKEs character 1 
into al! locations from UL to UR, The color mem- 
ory is always 54272 greater than the corresponding 
screen memory, so the in line 40 causes all char- 
acters to be black on the screen. 
Add lines 15 and 60 through 90 as shown below: 

5 PRINT CHRS(147) 

10 UL=1024 : UR=1063 

15 LL=1984 : LR=2023 

20 FOR SM=UL TO UR 

30 POKE SM,1 

40 POKE SM+54272,0 

50 NEXT 

60 FOR SM=UR TO LR STEP 40 

70 POKE SM,1 

80 POKE SM+54272,0 

90 NEXT 

Line 15 defines the other two corners of the screen. 
The new FOR-NEXT loop puts A's down the right 
side of the screen. Notice the STEP size of 40 in 
line 60. To go from right to left along the bottom of 
the screen, we must use a STEP of -I. To draw a 
vertical line from the bottom of the screen to the 
top. use a STEP of -40. To check your understand- 
ing of what we've covered, try adding some state- 
ments to this program to draw a box completely 
around the screen. 

A few modifications, as shown in the Spiral pro- 
gram below, takes these concepts one step further, 
and create an interesting graphic display. 

5 PRINT CHR$(147) 

10 UL=1024 : UR=1063 

15 LL=1984 : LR=2023 

20 C=RND(0)*256 

25 FOR SM=UL TO UR 

30 POKE SM,C 

40 POKE SM+54272,11 

50 NEXT 

60 LR=LR-41 : IF LR<1024 THEN10 

70 FOR SM=UR TO LR STEP 40 

80 POKE SM,C 

90 POKE SM+54272,11 



100 NEXT 

110 LL=LL-39 : IF LL<1023 THEN 10 

120 FOR SM=LR+1 TO LL STEP -1 

130 POKE SM.C 

140 POKE SM+54272,11 

150 NEXT 

160 UL=UL+41 : IF UL>2023 THEN 10 

170 FOR SM=LL TO UL STEP -40 

180 POKE SM,C 

190 POKE SM+54272,11 

200 NEXT 

210 UR=UR+39 : IF UR>2023 THEN 10 

220 GOTO 20 

Line 20 picks a random character between and 
255 inclusively. The IF statements in lines 60. 110. 
160, and 210 are "safety valves" which make sure 
that the memory addresses which will be POKEd do 
not exceed the screen boundaries. Poking data into 
the wrong places can definitely "lock up" your com- 
puter. In the worst case, you have to turn the power 
off and then on again. Those IP's guarantee that 
such a thing never happens in this program. As al- 
ways, he sure to SAVE your program before you run 
it. 

You should be able to understand the concepts 
used by this program. The " + 1" in line 120 is there 
simply for aesthetic reasons. You can easily replace 
the IPs with a variable so that the color changes as 
well as the character. Use a line similar to line 20 to 
randomly pick a number between and 15 for the 
color memory value. 

There are many other ways you can modify this 
program with very interesting results. Changing step 
sizes and rearranging the lines similar to line 60 
which vary the locations of the corners will drastic- 
ally change the results. Whatever you do, leave the 
IF statements! 

With the POKE statement, you put a number di- 
rectly into a specific memory location. If that mem- 
ory location happens to belong to the screen mem- 
ory, the computer does the rest of the work to dis- 
play the results on the screen, the PEEK statement 
allows you to read the value stored in a particular 
memory location. If you PEEK at an address asso- 
ciated with video memory, you will get a code num- 
ber telling you what is on the screen at the corre- 
sponding location. Who said PEEKs and POKEs 
were complicated? 

GETTING COORDINATED 

Quick— what is the address of the fourteenth col- 
umn of the twelfth row on the screen? Yes. it is 



72 AHOY! 



somewhere between 1024 and 2023, but where exact- 
ly? Even with the memory map in front of you. it is 
a bit tedious to figure out. 

So far the most difficult thing we've had to do is 
look up the memory address of a particular location 
on the screen. Let's make it even easier. We can pic- 
ture the video screen as a Cartesian coordinate sys- 
tem—you remember Descartes with his X's and Y's, 
with slopes and intercepts, don't you? If not, it 
doesn't matter. The computer will do all the work 
anyway. 

We will use the COLUMN numbers and the ROW 
numbers shown on the memory maps in your refer- 
ence book. Column numbers run from to 39, left 
to right, and Row numbers run from to 24, top to 
bottom. In other words, the origin (location 0.0) is 
in the upper left corner of the screen. That's differ- 
ent from the standard Cartesian coordinate system, 
but we can let the computer take care of that also. 

A fairly straightforward formula converts a COL- 
UMN. ROW pair of numbers into the corresponding 
Screen Memory address. The formula is: 

SM = 1024 + COLUMN + 40 * SOW 

or if you prefer to think in terms of X and Y, where 
X is the horizontal distance from the left, and Y is 
the vertical distance from the top: 

SM = 1024 + X + 40 * Y 

For example, the fourteenth column and the twelfth 
row has a memory address of 1518 as you can quick- 
ly see if you type 

PRINT 1024 + 14 + 40 * 12 

in direct mode. 

You could create a simple subroutine to plot a 
point anywhere on the screen. Of course this is low 
resolution, but as you saw from the Spiral program 
above, it can still be impressive. Your main program 
would specify an X arid Y value. Then call a sub- 
routine similar to this to plot each point: 

1000 sm = 1024 + X + 40 * Y 

1010 POKE SM, 81 

1020 POKE SM + 54272 

1030 RETURN 

The 81 corresponds to a circle in Set 1, although 
you could use any symbol you want. You could even 
use a variable if desired. Similarly the color value in 



line 1020 could be anything from to 15. 

As mentioned earlier, we can let the computer 
change the coordinates around so that 0.0 is in the 
lower left corner of the screen, just as the math 
books show. Simply change the Y in line 1000 above 
to (24 - Y). It looks like this: 

1000 SM = 1024 + X + 40 * (24 - Y 
) 

Now when Y equals 0, the computer uses 24. and 
when Y equals 24, the computer uses 0. All the 
other values are properly changed as well. 

The following program uses these concepts to 
draw a line between any two points on the screen. 
The program uses the Bresenham Algorithm which 
is described in a book by Newman and Sproull 
called Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics 
(Second Edition, McGraw-Hill, 1979). The algorithm 
generates a uniformly distributed set of points along 
the line from one point to another. The BASIC 
adaptation here won't win any speed records, and 
once again, we are only dealing with low resolution 
character graphics, but it is a reasonably efficient, 
general purpose, line-drawing program. 

5 :REM LINE DRAWING ROUTINE 

6 :REM FOR LOW RESOLUTION GRAPHIC 
S 

7 :REM USING THE BRESENHAM ALG0RI 
THM 

8 : 

10 PRINT CHR$(147) 

11 :REM SPECIFY XI, Yl AND X2.Y2 H 
ERE 

12 

13 :REM X=0 TO 39 : Y=*0 TO 24 

14 

18 

19 

20 X1 = : YU0 

30 GOSUB 100 

40 Xl = 39 : Y1=0 

5 GOSUB 100 

55 :REM DIAMOND 

60 Xl=10 : Yl=12 

70 READ X2,Y2 : IF X2=-l THEN 99 

80 GOSUB 100 : X1=X2 : Y1=Y2 : GO 

TO 70 

90 DATA 20,6,30,12,20,18,10,12,-1 

,-1 
95 : 

99 END :====================== 



REM FOR EXAMPLE. . . 

X2=39 : Y2=24 
X2=0 : Y2=24 



AHOY! 73 



100 DX=X2-X1 : DY=Y2-Y1 

110 IF ABS(DX)>ABS(DY) THEN D2=DX 

: D1=DY : C2=X1 : C1=Y1 : N=l :G 
0T0 130 
120 D2=DY : D1=DX : C2=Y1 t C1=X1 

: N-Q 
130 S2=SGN(D2) : S1=SGN(D1) : S3= 
S1*S2*D1*2 : E=S3-D2 : A2=ABS(R2) 

: D4=2*D2 I 

140 FOR J=l TO A2 

150 IF N=l THEN SM=1024+C2+40*C1 : 
GOTO 170 

160 SM=1024+C1+40*C2 
170 IF SM < 1024 OR SM > 2023 THE 
N 210 

180 POKE SM.102 : POKE SM+54272,1 
190 IF E*S2 > THEN E=E-D4 : Cl= 
Cl+Sl 

200 E=E+S3 : C2=C2+S2 
210 NEXT J 
220 RETURN 

It is possible to speed the program up somewhat 
by removing spaces and compressing statement lines. 
The only lines which are worth compressing are in 
the FOR-NEXT loop starting at line 140. That's 
where most of the action is. Be careful of the IF- 
THEN statements if you combine any lines. 

To use this program with the "normar coordinate 
configuration (0.0 in the lower left corner of the 
screen), replace CI in line 150 with (24 —CI), and 
replace C2 in line 160 with (24 -C2) just as we did 
in line 1000 above. Change the plotting character 
and its color in line 180. if desired. 

CHARACTER PRINTING 

So far, we have dealt with POKE graphics. This is 
a random-access type of" graphics, analogous to a 
floppy disk. Each screen location is as accessible as 
any other. PRINT graphics, on the other hand, are 
more sequential in nature, analogous to cassette stor- 
age. To get to a particular spot on the screen, we 
must move the cursor through sequential locations. If 
you are putting blocks of characters on the screen, 
such as words, then character printing is easier and 
preferable to POKEing, 

Once the cursor is in position, there is less to 
worry about with printing characters than with 
POKEing them, since the computer keeps track of 
updating the cursor. With POKE graphics, the cursor 
is not even affected, and it is up to the programmer 
to keep track of where the next character will ap- 
pear. 

74 AHOY! 



The Commodore computers allow strings com- 
posed of graphics characters to be contained in pro- 
grams and easily put onto the screen. For example, 
if we type: 

PRINT "<SHIFT-AXSHIFT-SXSHIFT-Z 
><SHIFT-X>" 

(where <shift-A> means hold down the shjft key 
and press the A key), the four card suits are printed 
oh the next screen line. To put them in the lower 
right corner of the screen, we must first position the 
cursor and then execute the PRINT statement. 

The cursor movements can also be contained with- 
in the quotation marks or they can be assigned to 
string variables. We might have a statement such as 
US^'^cursor up>" where we pressed the shift 
key with the cursor up/down key inside the quotation 
marks. Now whenever we execute PRINT US. the 
cursor will be moved up a line. 

The disadvantage of putting the graphics and cur- 
sor controls within quotation marks is that they are 
difficult to interpret and debug later. An alternative 
is to use variables as above, and also to use the 
CHRS function. To move the cursor up one line and 
print a heart symbol, we could use this statement: 

PRINT GHR$(145) ;CHR$(115) 

rather than PRINT " < cursor up> <shift-S> '*. 
They do the same thing, although the first statement 
is easier to interpret in a listing. The disadvantage of 
the first statement is that you must look in a book to 
see what CHR$(145) is. 

If you look in the ASCII and CHR$ Codes appen- 
dix in your reference book, you will see a list of 
keys or symbols and their corresponding ASCII (pro- 
nounced ASK-EE) values. CHR$(115) represents a 
heart shape and CHRS(145) represents a cursor-up 
command. 

Now you should be able' to figure out the remain- 
ing answers to the quiz at the start ofjhis article. 
Answer 1 B) moves the cursor home with CHRS09) 
and prints an "A" with CHR$(65). If CHRS047) had 
been used instead of CHR$(I9), the Clear/Screen 
function would have been performed.. Note that the 
shifted keystroke has an ASCII value which is 128 
greater than the- unshif'tcd keystroke. 

Answers 3 A) and 3 C) are clearly identical. The 
< RVS ON> function is duplicated by printing 
CHR$(18), and CHRS(57) corresponds to the "9" 
digit. Note that the numerical digits have ASCII val- 
ues which are 48 greater than their numeric value. 



Now you should be able to go back and pass the 
Low Resolution Graphics Qui/, with Hying colors. 
Each character cell that we have dealt with this 
month consists of much smaller dots, or pixels, on 
the video screen. Each character is actually an 8 by 
X block of pixels, sonic of which are on (or one col- 
or) while the others are off (or another color). Since 
there are 1000 character locations on the screen, and 
each location has 64 pixels, there are 64.000 dots 
which the computer can manipulate. 

Your Commodore computer gives you the ability 
to specify precisely which of the 64.000 pixels are 
on and which are off. You can also specify their col- 
ors. But we will discuss just exactly how that is 
done some other month. In other words, that is left 
as a problem for the student. 



Sound Explore 



r 



Continued from ptfge 29 
information you will ever see is presented to you on 
the screen. In order to modify any of the parameters 
in the chart on top of the screen, simply move the 
cursor over the appropriate parameter using the cur- 
sor control keys; then, enter the new value using the 
numbered keys and strike RETURN. 

In order to vary the other functions, simply strike 
the function key indicated to the right of the current 
value. You will be prompted at that point to enter 
the new value. 

Once you have created a sound that you wish to 
hear, press the spacebar. This starts the ADSR cycle. 
The volume of the oscillators will rise and fall as 
specified by attack and decay. At this point the 
sound will remain at the sustain level. When the 
spacebar is struck again, the envelopes will start 
their decay cycles. 

One general note: The 64 has fantastic sound ca- 
pabilities. In order to take advantage of them I very 
strongly recommend that you obtain an adapter to 
enable you to hook your 64 up to your stereo. You'll 
be amazed by the difference! □ 

SEE PROGRAM LISTING ON PAGE 90 



Cassette Interface 

Continued from page 34 

sette earphone jack and convert it into a signal that 
the computer can use. that is. a live volt signal. The 
signal from the cassette recorder can vary anywhere 
from six volts to twelve volts maximum depending 
on the unit used. The best way to prevent loading 
problems is to keep the volume control at one level 



all the time. If you can keep the control at maxi- 
mum for any brand of recorder, those loading prob- 
lems that have driven people to disk drives can near- 
ly be eliminated. 

From the schematic we see that there is a resistor, 
two diodes, and a capacitor that the earphone signal 
must pass through to get to the two inverters. The 
signal from the earphone is AC. that is, it travels 
above and below ground level reference. With the 
volume control set at maximum, this signal is nearly 
a square wave at the amplitude of the recorder's volt- 
age. When this signal meets those two diodes, it is 
prevented from going much below ground level, ac- 
tually .6 volts, and it can't go above 5 volts. This is 
about what the inverter wants, so the D-4 Cassette 
Read pin now has a nice five volt signal that only 
varies in frequency. 

The next thing we have to do is build the interface. 
As you can see from the photos, the circuitry is 
built into a small 2x4x1 inch box. The biggest prob- 
lem I had in putting this device together was the 
connector that goes to the Commodore. This is a 
six-pin connector and cannot be found in any local 
electronics supply store, What I did was to sacrifice 
a 12 pin connector I hail, and cut it down to the 
right size. Other sizes can also be modified (see 
parts list). This was then soldered onto a prototyping 
board which was cut to tit into the box. The six 
pins on one side have to be connected to the same 
six pins on the other side of the connector. It is a 
good idea to install a small piece of plastic in be- 
tween pins B-2 and C-3 of the connector to key it so 
that it won't be connected the wrong way. 

All the other components are mounted at various 
locations on the board and connected up. The box 
has two cutouts, one of either end to accept the ca- 
ble and the part of the board that connects to the 
connector. The switch is also mounted in the box. If 
you cut the board just right, as well as the cutouts in 
the box. the board will tit very snuggly and no 
mounting hardware will be required. See the photos. 

If you are not familiar with soldering and electron- 
ics, it is best to find a friend who is. You can try to 
follow my own layout from the photos, but this may 
be difficult. You have to use a low wattage soldering 
iron, and thin wire for all the interconnections. Since 
this interface is not a beginner's project, although it 
is simple. I cannot give detailed instructions on how 
to put it all together. As a last resort, you can pur- 
chase interfaces for cassettes from various sources, 
and I have seen them from S28 to S35. 

The parts list show that you can purchase ail of 
the parts from two sources. Since Jameco Electron- 

AHOY! 75 



ics has a minimum order of SIO. you may want to 
buy everything you can from them, and everything 
else from Radio Shack. Bui I have not used the 
Jamcco parts and cannot say what the sizes of some 
of their components are. However, there should he 
enough room in the box for everything. 

I hope that the mysterious cassette port has been 
demystified. My next project is to connect my 
TRS-80 up to the Commodore. I hope to bring you 
those sessions since my first attempt is to use and 
demystify the RS-232 port. Then I will be able to 
not only print out listings through my TRS-80, but 
also to save programs on my disk drives. Until then. 
happy computering. ~. 



COMMODATES 



Continued from page 49 

170 IF B>95 AND B<128 

$(B+64) 

180 PRINT#4,ES; 

NEXT 

PRINT#4,BS$ 

D=D+40:IF D>1984 THEN 

GOTO 110 



THEN E$=CHR 



190 
200 
210 
2 20 



230 



COMMODORE OWNERS 
WELL CHECK YOU OUT 



Mr Tester tk 

Is your Commodore 64 TM 
Disk Drive, Printer, Memory, 
Joystick, Monitor and Sound 
Chip operating correctly? 

You may never know 
for sure. Mr. Tester is a 
complete diagnostic that 
tests: 
1 .) Full joystick operation 

in all axis . 
2.) Continuous or standard 

comprehensive memory 

test. 
3.) CommodoreTM SID chip 

test lor sound analysis. 
4.) Screen alignment and 

color test. 
5.) Complete read/write Disk 

Track and Block Test. 
6.) Diskette format analysis lo 

check Floppys. 
7J Complete printer test. 
8.) Complete keyboard test. 
9.) Cassette read/write test. 

All this for only 

$ 29 95 




order from 

M-W Dist. Inc. 
1342B Route 23 
Butler, N.I. 07405 
201-838-9027 



Re.oer Sarvice No. 184 



230 CLOSE 4: END 

One final program this month comes from Larry 
Masterson (Willard. OH). This is not exactly a utili- 
ty. In tact it's a bit difficult to classify at all. You 
PEEK and POKE experts should have a good time 
figuring out wh:tl makes it work anyway. What does 
it do? Well, you probably wont believe your eyes. 
You'll have to get out a mirror and stand on your 
head to read your screen once you run this program. 
After you are tired of standing on your head, either 
RUN/STOP-RESTORE or POKE 53272,21 will make 
things normal again. Very interesting. Larry. 

2 :REM TURN YOUR SCREEN UPSIDE DO 
WN '. 

3 :REM SUBMITTED BY LARRY MASTERS 
ON 

4 : 

5 PRINTCHR$( 14 2) : POKE5 2 , 48 : POKE 56 
,48 

10 CLR:K=0:DIMA(511) ;X=7: Y=0 

20 P0KE56334,PEEK(56334)AND254 

30 P0KE1,PEEK(1)AND251 

40 F0RI=0T0511 :A(I)=PEEK(I+53248) 

:NEXT 

50 F0RI=XT0YSTEP-1 : P0KE1 2 288+K , A ( 

I):K=K+1 :NEXT:X=X+8: Y=Y+8 : IFX>=5 1 

2THEN100 

60 GOTO 50 

100 P0KE1 ,PEEK(1)0R4 

110 P0KE56334,PEEK(56334)0R1 

120 P0KE53272, (PEEK ( 5327 2 ) AND24 0) 

+ 12 

130 INPUT"TYPE";A$ 

140 :::REM POKE 53272,21 TO RET 

URN TO NORMAL: : : 

In addition to the people mentioned above, we 
have received solutions to March and April Commo- 
dores from Alan Bowen (Franklin. IN). Ian Fraser 
(100 Mile House. BC). Elizabeth Romig (Melrose. 
MA), James Viscosi age 14 (Oriskany, NY), John 
Oyzon age 13 (Rome. NY). Jim Bernard (Springfield. 
VA), Dave Haxton (Mqoresville, IN). Jean-Francois 
Couture (Chicoutimi, Quebec), Robert Bostwick 
(No. Platte. NE). HaRRob Van (Huber Heights. 
OH). Vince Cino (Silver Creek. NY), and Alan 
Scott (Morgantown, WV). 

Don't let the lag between when your letters arc 
received and when they're published discourage 
you! If you write every month, sooner or later 
you'll start seeing your name every month. □ 



76 AHOY! 



Base Conversions 

If * j Base Conversions 

Base Conversions 

FOR THE C-64 AND VIC 20 



By Drexel B. Gibson 

All beginning programmers, when they 
reach a certain point in their training, 
need to learn to convert numbers from 
one base to another. I'd so so far as to 



say that assembly language programming is impossi- 
ble without the ability to convert numbers between 
binary, decimal, and hexadecimal. 

We are all familiar with the base ten, or decimal, 
number system. A three-digit number like 123 stands 
for 3 + (2X10) + (1X10X10). with 10 being the base for 
the number system. It's the same in base two. called 
binary. 010 means +(1X2) +(0X2X2) or 2. Notice 
that there are only two digits used, and 1. In base 
16. usually called hexadecimal, we need 16 different 
digits, so we use the letters A-F to stand for 10-15. 
As an example, 5E3 stands for 3 +(14X16) + 
(5X16X16) or 1507. E in base 16 stands for 14. 

Computers store and read only binary code, but 
binary code is extremely difficult for us program- 
mers to read and use. The counting of the 0's and 
l's is very time consuming, and errors are bound to 
occur when the numbers you use get as lonsz as 
OOlOllOlOIOlOllllOOOOOOOOl'llOlllOlll. But a microcom- 
puter memory works like a series of capacitors 
which can exist in one of two states, charged or dis- 
charged. That's why the binary number system is 
used in a computer. 

To program in assembly language, binary code is 
often written in hexadecimal form so the program- 
mer doesn't have to count 0's and l's. Hexadecimal 
is chosen because four binary digits can be easily 
represented by one hexadecimal digit. Compare these 
two numbers and sec which is easier to remember: 
38AD or 0011100010101 101. They both mean the same 
thing. The first is hexadecimal, the second binary. 



Base Conversions will convert any positive number 
with a value less than 65535 from any of the three 
bases to another of the three. 65535 is the memory 
size of the Commodore 64 and the largest number 
that can be stored in 16 binary digits. The three 
bases are decimal, binary, and hexadecimal. Run this 
program and you'll see a list of the six functions that 
it will perform. This is called the menu because you 
make a selection just as you would if you were or- 
dering food in a restaurant. You choose one function 
and type in the corresponding number, or type a 7 
to end the program, then enter the value you would 
like to convert. When you hit RETURN you will get 
the answer and be returned, after touching another 
key, to the menu. You can then enter another num- 
ber or, if you typed a 7 to end the program, the 
program will terminate and return you to the BASIC 
operating system. 

Because the different computers store negative 
numbers in different forms I have not provided for 
negative numbers in this program. 

There are four subroutines used that may be 
patched into any other program. They convert binary 
to decimal, decimal to hexadecimal, hexadecimal to 
decimal and decimal to binary. To perform the other 
functions I chain two subroutines together. For ex- 
ample, to convert a binary number to hexadecimal I 
first convert it to decimal, then convert the decimal 
number to hexadecimal. This is not the fastest way, 
but it saves memory. 

If you thought that the mastery of base converting 
was an insurmountable obstacle in your programming 
education, we hope this program makes a convert 
out of you! Zl 

SEE PROGRAM LISTINGS ON PAGE 96 

AHOY! 77 



35(P 



i\hoy! 



PROGRAM 



We'll bet you're looking for- 
ward to trying out the 
fantastic programs in 
this issue of Ahoy! But A 
we'll bet you're not 
looking forward to 
typing them in. If 
you're an average 
typist, that should take 
you around 23 hours— not 
counting debugging time. 

How would you like 
someone to type the pro- 
grams for you? For, say — 
35< an hour? Don't you 
think it would be worth 35 C 



an hour to free yourself up for 

more pleasant pursuits— like 

enjoying the rest of your Ahoy! 

magazine? 

If you order the Ahoy! Pro- 
gram Disk, you'll be getting 
that service for just under 
35< an hour. Because 
for $7.95 we'll mai! 
you all the programs 
in a given issue, 
on a disk that's 
tested and ready to run 
with your C-64 or VIC 20. 
If you subscribe, you'll save 
even more: 12 monthly disks 
for $79.95, 24 for $149.95. 
You already know how to 
type. Why not use the hours 
you spend with your Commo- 
dore to learn something new? 



i 



NAME. 



ADDRESS. 



□ September Ahoy! Program Disk: $7.95 in USA, $10.00 in Canada. 
Elsewhere (outside USA and Canada) $12.00 
Postage and handling included. 

D 12-month Ahoy! Program Disk subscription: $79.95 in USA, 
$99.95 in Canada. 

Elsewhere {outside USA and Canada) $124.95 
Postage and handling included. 

□ 24-month Ahoy! Program Disk subscription: $149.95 in USA, 
$179.95 in Canada. 
Postage and handling included. 

Back issues are also available on disk: 

January-$12.95 ; rebruary-$ll.95; March-$10.95; April— S9.95; Moy-$9.95; June-$8.95; July— $8.95,- August-$8.95. 

(In Canada add $2.00 per disk; outside USA and Canada add $4.00 per disk) 



CITY. 



.STATE. 



.ZIP. 



PROGRAM LISTINGS 




n the following pages are listed several 
programs that we hope you'll want to 
punch in your Commodore computer. But 
please read the following introduction 
first: there are a few things you'll need to know. 

Certain computer commands are displayed on the 
monitor by a variety of odd-looking characters. To 
get your computer to display these commands ra- 
ther than actually perform them, you'll need to en- 
ter the quote mode. Hold down the SHIFT key and 
press the "2" key: a set of quote marks will ap- 
pear. This tells the computer that the characters 
that follow are to be displayed, not performed. To 
exit the quote mode, type another set of quote 
marks, or hit the RETURN key. You'll also enter 
the quote mode when you INserT spaces or charac- 
ters onto a line. 

In Ahoyl's program listings, you'll frequently 
Find letters and/or numbers surrounded by brackets 
{ }. That's because, for the purposes of clear re- 
production, we at Ahoy! use a daisy wheel printer 
incapable of reproducing command symbols. For 
example, when you're in the quote mode and 
press the SHIFT and CLR/HOME keys at the same 
time, the screen (or a dot-matrix printer) will indi- 



cate this command with a heart {||j}. Because a 
daisy wheel cannot duplicate this symbol, it substi- 
tutes an alternate code between brackets. In the 
case of the SHIFT/CLR HOME symbol, our prin- 
ter substitutes {SC}. 

Another special case is SHIFT and COMMO- 
DORE characters. We represent these by underlin- 
ing or overlining, respectively: any character un- 
derlined in the program listing should be punched 
in as a SHIFTed character ( J = SHIFT J), any 
character ovcrlined should be punched in as a 
COMMODORE character ( J = COMMODORE J). 

An alternate way of entering commands and 
other graphics symbols and characters is to use 
their corresponding character strings. The 
CLR/HOME command, for example, is entered by 
typing CHR$(147). While this requires a few extra 
strokes, it facilitates editing your program or read- 
ing the printed listing. For a complete list of CHRS 
codes, consult the appendix at the back of your 
Commodore user manual. 

Below is a list of the command abbreviations 
you'll, find in our program listings, the commands 
they stand for. how to enter them, and how they'll 
appear on the screen or on a dot matrix printout. 



When 






You 


When 






You 


^ ou See 


it Means 


You Type 


Will See 


You See 


It Means 


You Tjpe 


Will See 


(SC] 


Screen Clear 


SHIFT CLR/HOME 


m 


IYL) 


Yellow 


CNTRL 8 


H 


(HM) 


Hume 


CLR/HOME 


m 


(OR) 


Orange 


COMMODORE 1 


□ 


( CU ) 


Cursor Up 


SHIFT * CRSR . 


m 


(BR) 


Brown 


COMMODORE 2 


IS 


{CD} 


Cursor Down 


* CRSR * 


M 


(LR) 


Light Red 


COMMODORE 3 


m 


{CLj 


Cursor Left 


SHIFT • CRSR • 


II 


[Gl) 


Grey 1 


COMMODORE 4 


M 


(CR1 


Cursor Right 


« CRSR - 


a 


(G2) 


Grey 2 


COMMODORE 5 


ES 


(SS) 


Shifted Space 


SHIFT space 


■ 


(LG) 


Light Green 


COMMODORE 6 


■ 


(IN) 


Insert 


INST 


!■ 


(LB) 


Light Blue 


COMMODORE 7 


13 


(KV) 


Reverse On 


CNTRL" 


H 


(G3) 


Grej 3 


COMMODORE 8 


:: 


(RO) 


Reverse Orf 


CNTRL 


■ 


(Fl) 


Function 1 


F 1 


5 


(BK) 


Black 


CNTRL 1 


■ 


(F2) 


Function 2 


F2 


a 


(WH) 


White 


CNTRL 2 


L3 


(F3) 


Function 3 


F3 


g| 


(RD) 


Red 


CNTRL 3 


§2 


(F4) 


Function 4 


F4 


B 


ICY) 


Cyan 


CNTRL 4 


n 


(F5) 


F" unction 5 


FS 


■ 


{PU} 


Purple 


CNTRL 5 


m 


(F6) 


Function 6 


F6 


a 


(GN) 


Green 


CNTRL 6 


o 


(F7) 


Function 7 


F 7 


a 


(BL) 


Blue 


CNTRL 7 


n 


(F8) 


Function 8 


F 8 


AHOY! 79 



IMPORTANT! 

Before typing in the Bug Repellent and other Ahoy! 
programs, refer to the information on page 67. 



I 



IC20 

UG REPELLENT 



By Michael Kleinert and David Barron 

The program listed below will allow you to quickly debug any 
Ah(/y! program you type in on your VIC 20. Follow directions for • 
cassette or disk. 

For cassette: type in and save the Bug Repellent program, then , 
type RUN 63000[RETURN]SYS 828f RETURN]. If you typed the 
program properly, it will generate a set of two-letter line codes 
that wilt match those listed below the program on this page. (If 
you didn't type the program properly, of course, no line codes 
will be generated. You'll have to debug the Bug Repellent itself • 
the hard way.) 

Once you've got a working Bug Repellent, type in the program , 
you wish to check. Save it and type the RUN and SYS com- 
mands listed above once again, then compare the line codes 
generated to those listed in the magazine. If you spot a diserep- * 
ancy, a typing error exists in that line. Important: you must use 
exactly the same spacing as the program in the magazine. Due to • 
memory limitations on the VIC, the VIC Bug Repellent will 
register an error if your spacing varies from what's printed. 

You may type SYS 828 as many times as you wish, but if you ' 
use the cassette for anything, type RUN 63000 to restore the 
Repellent. » 

When your program has been disinfected you may delete all 
lines from 63000 on. (Be sure the program you type doesn't in- 
clude lines above 63000!) 

For disk: type in the Bug Repellent, save it, and type 
RUN:NEW[ RETURN]. (See above regarding testing the Bug 
Repellent on itself.) Type in the program you wish to check, then 
SYS 828. This will generate a set of two-letter line codes that you 
should compare to those listed in the magazine. 

To pause the line codes listing, press SHIFT. To permanently 
pause it. press SHIFT LOCK. To continue, release SHIFT LOCK. 

To send the list to the printer type OPEN 4.4:CMD 4:SYS 
828[RETURNI When the cursor comes back, type 
PRlNT#4:CLOSE 4[RETURN]. 

•63000 FOR X = 828 TO 1023 :READ Y 

:P0KE X,Y:NEXT:END 
.63001 DATA 169, 0, 133, 63, 133, 

64, 165, 43, 133, 251 
•63002 DATA 165, 44, 133, 252, 160 

, 0, 132, 254, 32, 228 
.63003 DATA 3, 234, 177, 251, 208, 

3, 76, 208, 3, 230 
.63004 DATA 251, 208, 2, 230, 252, 

169, 244, 160, 3, 32 
•63005 DATA 30, 203, 160, 0, 177, 

251, 170, 230, 251, 208 
.63006 DATA 2, 230, 252, 177, 251, 
32, 205, 221, 169, 58 

80 AHOY! 



63007 DATA 32, 210, 255, 169, 0, 
133, 253, 230, 254, 32 

63008 DATA 228, 3, 234, 165, 253, 
160, 0, 170, 177, 251 

63009 DATA 201, 32, 240, 6, 138, 
113, 251, 69, 254, 170 

63010 DATA 138, 133, 253, 177, 25 
1, 208, 226, 165, 253, 41 

63011 DATA 240, 74, 74, 74, 74, 2 
4, 105, 65, 32, 210 

63012 DATA 255, 165, 253, 41, 15, 
24, 105, 65, 32, 210 

63013 DATA 255, 169, 13, 32, 210, 
255, 173, 141, 2, 41 

63014 DATA 1, 208, 249, 230, 63, 
208, 2, 230, 64, 230 

63015 DATA 251, 208, 2, 230, 252, 
76, 74, 3, 169, 236 

63016 DATA 160, 3, 32, 30, 203, 1 
66, 63, 165, 64, 32 

63017 DATA 205, 221, 169, 13, 32, 
210, 255, 96, 230, 251 

6301S DATA 208, 2, 230, 252, 96, 
0, 76, 73, 78, 69 

63019 DATA 83, 58, 32, 0, 76, 73, 
78, 69, 32, 35 

63020 DATA 32, 0, 0, 0, 0, 



BUG REPELLENT LINE CODES 






FOR VIC 20 BUG REPELLENT 






LINE # 


63000 :MH 


LINE # 


63011 


NN 


LINE # 


63001 :BD 


LINE # 


63012 


IG 


LINE # 


63002 :F0 


LINE # 


63013 


EN 


LINE # 


63003 :ND 


LINE # 


63014 


GJ 


LINE # 


63004 :DJ 


LINE # 


63015 


IK 


LINE # 


63005: LP 


LINE # 


63016 


HG 


LINE # 


63006: JB 


LINE # 


63017 


CK 


LINE # 


6 3007: JF 


LINE # 


63018 


JF 


LINE # 


63008 :KA 


LINE # 


63019 


OH 


LINE # 


63009: HP 


LINE # 


63020 


LH 


LINE # 


63010:KJ 


LINES: 


21 





C-64 

BUG REPELLENT 

By Michael Kleinert and David Barron 

The program listed below will allow you to quickly debug any 
Ahoy! program you type in on your C-64. 



Type in. SAVE, and RUN the Bug Repellent, Type NEW. 
then type in or LOAD the Ahoy! program you wish to cheek. 
When that's done. SAVE your program (don't RUN it!) and 
type SYS 49152 [RETURN]. You'll be asked if you want the 
line value eodes displayed on the screen or dumped to the 
printer. If you select screen, it will appear there. 

The table wiil move quickly, too quickly for most mortals to 
follow. To pause the listing depress arid hold the SHIFT key. To 
pause for an extended period, depress SHIFT LOCK. As long as it 
is locked, the display will remain frozen. 

Compare the table your machine generates to the table in Alwyl 
that follows the program you're entering: If you spot a difference. 
an error exisls in that line. Jot down the numbers of lines where con- 
tradictions occur. LIST each line, spot the errors, and correct them. 

5000 FOR X = 49152 TO 49488 :READ 
Y:P0KE X,Y:NEXT:END 

5001 DATA 32, 161, 192, 165, 43, 
133, 251, 165, 44, 133 

5002 DATA 252, 160, 0, 132, 254, 
32, 37, 193, 234, 177 

5003 DATA 251, 208, 3, 76, 138, 1 
92, 230, 251, 208, 2 

5004 DATA 230, 252, 76, 43, 192, 
76, 73,- 78, 69, 32 

5005 DATA 35, 32, 0, 169, 35, 160 
, 192, 32, 30, 171 

5006 DATA 160, 0, 177, 251, 170, 
230, 251, 208, 2, 230 

5007 DATA 252, 177, 251, 32, 205, 
189, 169, 58, 32, 210 

5008 DATA 255, 169, 0, 133, 253, 
230, 254, 32, 37, 193 

5009 DATA 234, 165, 253, 160, 0, 
76, 13, 193, 133, 253 

5010 DATA 177, 251, 208, 237, 165 
, 253, 41, 240, 74, 74 

5011 DATA 74, 74, 24, 105, 65, 32 
, 210, 255, 165, 253 

5012 DATA 41, 15, 24, 105, 65, 32 
, 210, 255, 169, 13 

5013 DATA 32, 220, 192, 230, 63, 
208, 2, 230, 64, 230 

5014 DATA 251, 208, 2, 230, 252, 
76, 11, 192, 169, 153 

5015 DATA 160, 192, 32, 30, 171, 
166, 63, 165, 64, 76 

5016 DATA 231, 192, 96, 76, 73, 7 
8, 69, 83, 58, 32 

5017 DATA 0, 169, 247, 160, 192, 
32, 30, 171, 169, 3 

5018 DATA 133, 254, 32, 228, 255, 
201, 83, 240, 6, 201 

5019 DATA 80, 208, 245, 230, 254, 
32, 210, 255, 169, 4 



•5020 DATA 166, 254, 160, 255, 32, 

186, 255, 169, 0, 133 
•5021 DATA 63, 133, 64, 133, 2, 32 

, 189, 255, 32, 192 
•5022 DATA 255, 166, 254, 32, 201, 

255, 76, 73, 193, 96 
•5023 DATA 32, 210, 255, 173, 141, 

2, 41, 1, 208, 249 
•5024 DATA 96, 32, 205, 189, 169, 

13, 32, 210, 255, 32 
•5025 DATA 204, 255, 169, 4, 76, 1 

95, 255, 147, 83, 67 
.5026 DATA 82, 69, 69, 78, 32, 79, 

82, 32, 80, 82 
•5027 DATA 73, 78, 84, 69, 82, 32, 

63, 32, 0, 76 
•5028 DATA 44, 193, 234, 177, 251, 

201, 32, 240, 6, 138 
•5029 DATA 113, 251, 69, 254, 170, 

138, 76, 88, 192, 
•5030 DATA 0, 0, 0, 2 30, 251, 208, 

2, ■ 230, 252, 96 
•5031 DATA 170, 177, 251, 201, 34, 

208, 6, 165, 2, 73 
•5032 DATA 255, 133, 2, 165, 2, 20 

8, 218, 177, 251, 201 
•5033 DATA 32, 208, 212, 198, 254, 

76, 29, 193, 0, 169 
.5034 DATA 13, 76, 210, 255, 0, 0, 





BUG REPELLENT LINE CODES 
FOR C-64 BUG REPELLENT 



LINE 


# 


5000 


:GJ 


LINE 


# 


5018 


:FK 


LINE 


# 


5001 


:DL 


LINE 


# 


5019 


:FL 


LINE 


# 


500 2 


:DB 


LINE 


# 


5020 


CL 


LINE 


i 


5003 


:0F 


LINE 


# 


5021 


:GC 


LINE 


# 


5004 


:KN 


LINE 


# 


5022 


.NN 


LINE 


# 


5005 


:CA 


LINE 


# 


5023 


NH 


LINE 


# 


5006 


:CE 


LINE 


# 


5024 


:IM 


LINE 


# 


5007 


: JE 


LINE 


# 


5025 


KC 


LINE 


# 


5008 


•CL 


LINE 


# 


5026 


DC 


LINE 


# 


5009 


:NB 


LINE 


a 


50 2 7 


ML 


LINE 


# 


5010 


:MB 


LINE 


# 


5028 


GN 


LINE 


# 


5011 


:EP 


LINE 


# 


5029 


JK 


LINE 


# 


5012 


GH 


LINE 


# 


5030 


NA 


LINE 


# 


5013 


i AN 


LINE 


# 


5031 


DM 


LINE 


ir 


5014 


NG 


LINE 


# 


5032 


JA 


LINE 


§ 


5015 


BF 


LINE 


# 


5033 


FM 


LINE 


# 


5016 


EP 


LINE 


# 


5034- 


PA 


LINE 


# 


5017 


PJ 


LINES 


I : 


35 














AHOY! 


81 



DOS 



FROM PAGE 21 

10 PRINT "{SC} 
DIM A 
TAB(1 
TAB(1 



53281, 1 



20 PRINT 
25 PRINT 

{R0}£" 
30 PRINT TAB(1 
"*"{R0}0MM0D0RE 
35 PRINT TAB(1 
40 FOR A = l TO 
45 PRINT TAB(7 
50 PRINT 

A T I N 
55 PRINT 
T E M" 
60 FOR A=l TO 
70 PRINT TAB(8 
. .BOB LLORET" 
80 PRINT TAB(1 
T (BK}(C) {PU/} 
90 FOR D=l TO 
100 PRINT "(SC 
E 53281,6 
110 PRINT "{WH 
K OPERATING SY 



":P0KE 53280,0: POKE 
E$(200) :PRINT 
0);"{BL}{RV}£. " 

0);"{RV) {RO} {RV} 

0);"{RV} {RO} (RV) 

C_ 64" 
0);"*"{RV} " 
3:PRINT:NEXT A 
);"{RD}D I S K" 

TAB(11);"{CD} {RD)0 PER 

G" 

TAB(21);"{CD}{RD} SYS 



4:PRINT:NEXT A 
);"{BL}DESIGNED BY. 

1)"{CD}{PU]C0PYRIGH 

1984" 

2500: NEXT D 

}":POKE 53280, 0:POK 

} {CD} UCCCC fRV} DIS 
STEM V3.0 fROl CCCCI 



-115 PRINT 
•116 PRINT 

• 120 PRINT 

DISK 
ii 

■ 125 PRINT 

■ 130 PRINT 

FILE 
it 

• 135 PRINT 

■ 140 PRINT 
E DISK 

•141 PRINT 

• 142 PRINT 
0} HELP S 

. 145 FOR A 

8)"B":NEX 

•150 PRINT 

?{RV}[1- 

PRINT 

.160 GET A 

•170 AN=VA 

.180 IF AN 

•190 ON AN 

82 AHOY! 



0,700,1200 

198 REM **** 

199 REM ===== 

200 PRINT TAB 
NAME (16 CHR) 
} {CR} {CR} {CR} 
$ 

>210 PRINT TAB 

ID (2 CHR)": 

CR} {CR} {CR} {C 

R}(CR)(CR}(CR 

,220 NA$="NEWO 

-230 PRINT TAB 

OU SURE (YNN) 

240 GET AN$:I 

IF AN$="Y 

IF AN$="N 

IF AN$<>" 



250 
260 
2 70 
240 
280 
290 
295 
298 
* 

299 REM 



FORMAT DISK **** 

(8);"{RV}ENTER DISK 
":INPUT "{CRHCRHCR 
(CR) {CR} {CR} {CR}";NA 

(10) ;"{RV}ENTER DISK 
INPUT "{CR} {CR} {CR} { 
R} {CR} {CR} {CR} {CR}{C 
}";ID$ 

:"+NA$+","+ID$ 
(10);"{BK}{RV) ARE Y 

?" 
F AN$= n " THEN 240 
" THEN 280 
" THEN 100 
Y" OR AN$<>"N" THEN 



OPEN 15,8,15,NA$ 
CLOSE 15 
GOTO 100 

REM **** RENAME UTILITY *** 



"{CU} B";SPC(36)"B." 
" _B";SPC(36)"A" 
" _B [RV}[1] {RO} FORMAT 
{RV} [4]{R0} ERASE PRG J. 

" JB";TAB(38)"B" 

" .J. {RV}[2}{R0] RENAME 

{RV}[5]{R0} WRITE DOS B. 

" .B"; TAB (38)"!." 

" 3. {RV}[3] {RO} VALIDAT 

{RV} [6]{R0} DIRECTORY B. 

" B."; TAB (38) "J." 

"3. {RV}[7]{R 

CREEN _B" 

=1 TO 1:PRINT " !";TAB(3 
T A 

" JCCCCCCCO YOUR CHOICE 
7] fROK CCCCCCCCK ": PRINT: 

N$:IF AN$="" THEN 160 
L(AN$) 

<1 OR AN>7 THEN 160 
GOTO 200 ,300 , 400 , 500 , 60 



>300 PRINT 
NEW NAME ( 
}{CR}{CR}{ 
{CRHCR}"; 
■310 PRINT 
OLD NAME ( 
}{CR}{CR}( 
{CR} {CR}"; 
•320 CH$="R 
•330 OPEN 1 
'500: NEXT D 
•340 PRINT 

R D=l TO 1 
■350 CLOSE 
- 398 REM ** 
' 399 REM == 
■400 PRINT 
ALIDATING 
.410 OPEN 1 
,440 CLOSE 
.498 REM ** 
.499 REM == 
•500 PRINTT 
E OF PROGR 



TAB(8);"{RV} {WH} ENTER 

16 CHR)":INPUT "{CR} {CR 

CR}{CR}{CR} {CR} {CR} {CR} 

NN$ 

TAB(8);"{RV) {CD} ENTER 

16 CHR)":INPUT "{GR} {CR 

CRHCRHCR} {CR} {CR} { CR } 

OLN$ 

0:"+NN$+"="+OLN$ 

5,8,15,CH$:F0R D=l TO 1 



NPUT "{CR} 
}{CR}(CR}{ 
510 ER$="S 



TAB(17);"{RV} DONE ":F0 

000: NEXT D 

15: GOTO 100 

** VALIDATE DISK **** 

TAB(12);"{WH}{RV}{CD} V 

DISK " 

5,8, 15, "VALIDATE" 

15: GOTO 100 

** SCRATCH PROGRAM **** 

AB(3);"{WH} {RV} {CD} NAM 
AM TO ERASE (16 CHR)":I 
{CRHCRHCR} tCR}tCR}{CR 
CR}{CR}";PN$ 
0:"+PN$ 



IMPORTANT 

Before typing in an Ahoy! program, refer to the 
first two pages of the program listings section. 



520 OPEN 15,8,15,ER$ 

530 FOR D=l TO 500: NEXT D:PRINT T 

AB(17);"{RV} {CD} DONE " : FOR D=l T 

15 00: NEXT D 

540 CLOSE 15: GOTO 100 

598 REM **** WRITE DOS **** 

599 REM =================== 

600 PRINT TAB(9);"{WH} {RV} (CD} WR 
ITING DOS FILES " 

610 SAVE "DOS", 8 

620 PRINT TAB(17) ;"{RV} {CD} DONE 

":F0R D=l TO 1500:NEXT D 

630 CLOSE 15: GOTO 100 

700 REM **** DISK DIRECTORY *** 

* 

705 REM ========================= 

710 PRINT "{SC}":P0KE 53280?4:POK 

E 53281,1 

720 AE$="":AN=O:A0=0:DE=O:DR$="0" 

730 ER=0 : F$="" : FL=0 : 1=0 : J=0 :MM=0: 

MN=0 

750 OPEN 15,8,15:PRINT#15,"I"+DR$ 

760 INPUT#15,ER:IF ER=21 THEN890 

770 OPEN 8,8,8,"$"+DR$+",SEQ" 

780 FOR DE=1 TO 8:F$="":GET #8,C$ 

790 IF C$=CHR$(199) THENCLOSE 8:C 

LOSE 15:G0T0900 

800 IF C$="" THENJ=29:G0T0860 

810 IF ASC(C$)<>130 THENJ=29 : GOTO 

860 

820 AN=AN+1 :J=11:GET #8,C$:GET #8 

,C$ 

830 FOR 1=1 TO 16:GET #8,C$:F$=F$ 

+C$:NEXT 

840 IF LEFT$(F$,3)="DOS" THENAN=A 

N-1:G0T0860 

850 AE$(AN)=DR$+":"+F$ 

860 FOR 1=1 TO J:GET #8,C$:NEXT 

870 IF DE<>8 THENGET #8,C$:GET #8 
C$ 

880 NEXT:GOT0780 

890 PRINT"{CD} {CD} {CD} {CD} {CD} {RV 

}N0 DISKETTE FOUND IN DRIVE";DR$; 

"{CD}":F0RD=1T0 2500 :NEXT : GOTO 10 


•900 IF AN=0 THENPRINT "{BK}{CD}{C 

D}{CD}{CD) {CD} {CR} [CR}{RV}NO PROG 

RAMS FOUND ( RO} " : FORD=1T02500 : NEX 

T:G0T0 100 
•910 PRINT "{SC}"TAB(7)"{CD} (PU}UC 

CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCI" 
•920 MM=9:PRINT TAB(7)"B. * D I R E 



C T R Y * B" 

930 PRINT TAB(7)"{PU}JCCCCCCCCCCC 
CCCCCCCCCCCCK" : PRINT "{CD} {CD} {CD 

}" 

940 FOR 1=1 TO 9:IF AE$(MN*9+1 )=" 

" THENMM=I-l:I=9:GOTO960 

950 PRINT TAB(11);"{PU} {RV}[";RIG 

HT$(STR$(I) ,1);"] {BL} [RO} " ;MID$( 

AE$(MN*9+I) ,3,16) 

960 NEXT:PRINT TAB( 1 1 ) " {PU} {CD] {C 

D} {CDJYOUR CHOICE [1-9]" 

965 PRINT TAB(11)"PRESS Fl FOR DO 

S" 

970 PRINT TAB(11)"0R RETURN FOR M 

ORE" 

980 GET C$:IF C$="" THEN980 

985 IF C$="{F1}" THEN 100 

990 IF C$OCHR$(13) THEN1020 

1000 MN=MN+1:IF MN*9+1>AN THENMN= 



1010 GOT0910 

1020 IF VAL(C$)<1 OR VAL(C$)>MM T 

HEN980 

1030 AE$=AE$(MN*9+VAL(C$)) 

1040 PRINT:PRINT " {SC} { CD ] { CD} { CD 

}{CD}MENU ITEM CHOSEN: #";C$;" - 

";MID$(AE$,3,16) 

1050 FOR 1=18 TO 1 STEP -1:FL=I 

1060 IF ASC(MID$(AE$,I,1))<>160 T 

HENI=1 

1070 NEXT:PRINT " {CD} {CD } { CD} {CD} 

L0AD";CHR$(34);LEFT$(AE$,FL);CHR$ 

^^"^{CDnCDHCDHCD}" 

1080 PRINT "RUN":PRINT "{CU}{CU}{ 

CU } { CU } { CU } { CU } { CU } { CU } { CU } " 

1090 POKE 631,13:POKE 632,13:P0KE 

198,2:END 
1200 PRINT"{SC}":P0KE 53280, 0:P0K 
E 53281,0 
1210 PRINT TAB(7)"{PU} * H E L P 

SCREEN*" 
1220 PRINT"{RD}{CD] {RV}[1] {RO} P 
RESS #1{LB) TO FORMAT A NEW DISK 
OR ANY DISK YOU WISH "; 
1230 PRINT "TO TOTALY ERASE." 
1240 PRINT "{RV}{RD}[2] {RO} PRES 
S #2{LB) TO CHANGE THE NAME OF AN 
Y PROGRAM ON A DISK."; 
1250 PRINT " YOU SHOULD ALWAYS 

LIST THE DISK DIRECTORY FIRST TO 

MAKE SURE"; 
1260 PRINT " YOU SPELL THE OLD NA 
ME CORRECTLY TO INSURE NO DISK 

AHOY! 83 



ERRORS." 
•1270 PRINT "{RV}{RD][3]{R0} PRES 

S #3{LB} AFTER YOU HAVE USED A DI 

SK FOR A WHILE. THIS " ; 
•1280 PRINT "WILL COMPACT YOUR 

PROGRAMS AND ELIMINATE UNUSED BL 

OCKS "; 
• 1290 PRINT " ON A DISK." 
•1300 PRINT M {RV}{RD) [4] {RO} PRES 

S #4{LB] WHEN YOU WISH TO ERASE A 

NY PROGRAM ON A DISK."; 
•1310 PRINT" ALWAYS LIST THE 

DISK DIRECTORY TO INSURE PROPER S 

PELL ING"; 
•1320 PRINT " OF THE PROGRAM." 
•1330 PRINT "{RV} {RD}[5]{R0} PRES 

S #5{LB) TO MAKE A COPY OF D S 

ON ALL YOUR DISKS."; 
•1340 PRINT " THIS WILL MAKE IT 

HANDY IF YOU EVER NEED IT." 
•1350 PRINT "{RD] (RV}[6] (RO} PRES 

S #6{LB} TO LIST THE DIRECTORY AN 

D RUN ANY PROGRAM"; 
•1355 PRINT " ON THE DISK." 
•1360 PRINT TAB(10)"{YL} {CD}<PRESS 

Fl FOR D S>"; 
.1370 GET AN$:IF AN$="" THEN 1370 
•1380 IF AN$="{F1)" THEN 100 
•1390 IF AN$<>"{F1J" THEN 1370 



BUG REPELLENT LINE CODES 
FOR DOS 

LINE # 10:CK LINE # 135:DI 

LINE # 20:EJ LINE # 140:NO 

LINE # 25:NI LINE # 141:DI 

LINE # 30:EK LINE # 142:EP 

LINE # 35:MB LINE # 145:B0 

LINE # 40:GN LINE # 150: CD 

LINE # 45:MJ LINE # 160:CJ 

LINE # 50:BB LINE # 170:BK 

LINE # 55:BB LINE # 180:HH 

LINE # 60:FM LINE # 190:NE 

LINE # 70:DG LINE # 198:CC 

LINE # 80:11 LINE # 199:CD 

LINE # 90:BI LINE # 200 : FP 

LINE # 100:0J LINE # 210:DD 

LINE # 110:EK LINE # 220:ME 

LINE # 115:MC LINE # 230:HN 

LINE # 116:FN LINE # 240:EM 

LINE # 120:FM LINE # 250:0D 

LINE # 125:DI LINE # 260:LH 

LINE # 130:KE LINE # 270:0J 



LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE § 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 



2 80: OP 
290:AB 
295:CF 
298:EJ 
299:ME 
300: MM 
310:FI 
320 :LD 
330:11 
340:NJ 
3 50: FN 
398:CI 
399: JO 
400:11 
4 1 : MK 
440: FN 
498:NK 
499:J0 
500 :FC 
510:P0 
520:PL 
530:IM 
540: FN 
598:IG 
599:CH 
600 :JI 
610:CD 
620 :CJ 
630: FN 
700:0D 
705: ME 
7 10: HO 
7 20:HH 

7 30-.KN 
750:JL 
760 :IC 
770 :BM 
780: AD 
7 90: HA 
800 :DE 
810:JG 
820:EB 
830 :GM 
840 :BA 
850:CK 
860: AN 

8 70: MO 



LINE 


# 


880: OK 


LINE 


# 


890 :IL 


LINE 


# 


900:LJ 


LINE 


# 


910:JD 


LINE 


# 


9 20:MJ 


LINE 


# 


9 30:NK 


LINE 


# 


940:GN 


LINE 


# 


950-.PG 


LINE 


§ 


960:HG 


LINE 


# 


965:AE 


LINE 


# 


970:KL 


LINE 


# 


980: HI 


LINE 


# 


985:KE 


LINE 


# 


990: CD 


LINE 


# 


1000: DC 


LINE 


# 


1010: CK 


LINE 


# 


1020:IC 


LINE 


# 


1030: PL 


LINE 


# 


1040: CD 


LINE 


# 


1050:CF 


LINE 


# 


1060:GG 


LINE 


# 


1070:DN 


LINE 


# 


1080: DP 


LINE 


# 


1090: AN 


LINE 


# 


1200:0D 


LINE 


# 


1 2 1 : HL 


LINE 


# 


1220:MH 


LINE 


# 


1230:BG 


LINE 


# 


1240:GP 


LINE 


# 


1250:PK 


LINE 


# 


1260:NI 


LINE 


# 


1270:CL 


LINE 


# 


1280: OP 


LINE 


# 


1290:KK 


LINE 


# 


1300: IF 


LINE 


# 


1310:NM 


LINE 


# 


1320:CF 


LINE 


# 


1330:CC 


LINE 


# 


1340:HD 


LINE 


# 


1350:FB 


LINE 


# 


1355-.BI 


LINE 


# 


1360:0L 


LINE 


# 


1370:FA 


LINE 


# 


1380:A0 


LINE 


# 


1390:PF 


LINES: 


132 


1 ! 



SALVAGE 
DIVER 

FROM PAGE 23 



84 AHOY! 



IMPORTANT 

Before typing in an Ahoy! program, refer to the 
first two pages of the program listings section. 



1 STOP 

2 POKE53280,7:POKE53281,0 

4 PRINT" {SC} {WH} {CD} {CD} {CD} (CD}" 
;SPC(7);"{RV}***** SALVAGE DIVER! 

***** » 

6 PRINT" {CD} {CD}{CD}";SPC(13) ;"A 
C-64 PROGRAM" 

7 PRINT"{CD} {CD}";SPC(11);"(C) CO 
PYRIGHT 1984" 

8 PRINT"{CD} {CD}";SPC(13);"BY B.W 
.BEHLING" 

10 PRINTSPC(3);"{CD} {CD} [CD] {CD} 

PLEASE WAIT. READING DATA " 

12 F0RB=0TO4:FORI=0TO62 

14 READA:P0KE(240+B)*64+I,A 

16 NEXTI:NEXTB 

18 DIMT$(56),T(56,l):FORI=0T056:R 

EADW$:READW:T$(I)=W$:T(I,0)=W:T(I 

,1)=0:NEXTI 

20 FORI=49152T049301:READA:POKEI, 

A:NEXTI 

2 2 FORI=49408T049575:READA:POKEI, 

A:NEXTI:RESTORE 

24 F0RI=0T062:P0KE246*64+I,0:NEXT 

I 

30 MA= 15766 : POKEMA , 195 : POKEMA+3 , 1 

02 : POKEMA+6 , 60 : POKEMA+9 , 24 : POKEMA 

+12,60 

32 POKEMA+15,102:POKEMA+18,195 

34 FORI=0T062STEP3 : F0RN=2TO0STEF- 

1 

36 READA:GOSUB100 

38 P0KE245*64+(I+N),A2;NEXTN:NEXT 

I 

40 REM***** START ***** 

50 WD=0:WL=0:WD$="0.00":WL$="0.00 

" : BA=0 : DI = 3 : DD=0 : DA = 2000 : DA$="200 

0" 

52 V=53248:M=2040:POKEV+21,0:POKE 

V+38,7:P0KEV+3 7,10:P0KEV+28,128:S 

1 = 1024 

54 S2=1944:POKEV+27,0:POKEM+6,246 

:K=54272 :C 1=55296 :C2=5621 6 

56 FORI=39TO44:P0KEV+I,ll:NEXTI:P 

0KEV+45,l:P0KEV+46,4 

58 FORI=OT010STEP2 : POKEV+I , : NEXT 

I:POKEV+16,0:GOT0600 

60 REM***** DRAW SCREEN ***** 

61 PRINT"{SC}":P0KE53280,6:F0RI=0 
T079 : POKES 1 + 1, 1 60 :P0KEC 1 + 1,1: NEXT 
I 

62 F0RI=80T0159:P0KES1+I, 160:P0KE 
C1+I,14:NEXTI 



64 F0RI=0T080:P0KES2+I,160:P0KEC2 

+ 1 12: NEXTI 

66 ' PRINT" (HM) {CD} {CD} (CD) {CD} {CD} 

{CD} {CD} {CD} {CD} {GN} Y";SPC(15);" 

{BR}B" 

68 PRINT"{GN} Y" ; SPC( 12) ; "Y {BRJC. 

+C {GN}Y";SPC(12);"Y" 

70 PRINT"{GN) Y";SPC£12);"Y {BR} 

Q { G2 LCCCCCCCCCCC { BR } W" ; SPC ( 8 ) ; " { G 

N}Y"" 

72 PRINT"{GN} Y" ; SPC( 12) ; "Y {BR} 

B";SPC(7);"{GN}Y {BRJB. {GN}Y 

Y" 
74 PRINT"{GN} Y" ; SPC( 12) ; "Y { BR}CC 
+CC {GN}Y (BR}C+C(GN}Y 



Y" 

76 PRINT"{GN} Y Y";SPC(9);"Y {B 
R}1 {BL}{RV} {R0}{GN)Y {BR 
LB {GN}Y Y Y" 

78 PRINT"{GN} Y Y";SPC(9);"Y {B 
R}B {RD}{RV} {R0}{GN}Y {BR 
)B {GN}Y Y Y Y" 

80 PRINT" {GN} Y Y Y Y {BR 
}B. (G3}T {RV} {RO} [GN)Y{G3}T 
(BR)B (GN)Y Y Y Y" 

82 PRINT"{GN} Y Y Y {G3}T(G 
N)Y {BR}B{GN}Y {G3){RV} TTT {R 
0} {BR}B {GN}Y Y Y Y" 
84 PRINT"(GN} Y Y Y {G3}{RV} 
Q.QJR0} (BR} 1{GN} Y {G3}{RV} Q_ Q_ 
Q. {RO} {BRJ1 RRRR {GN}Y Y" 
86 P RINT "(GN} Y YY {G3 }^{ RV}_f {RO} 
{BR}RRRR{RV} {G3} { ROJJBRJRR+RR { 
RV}{G3} {RO} {BR}RR+R{RV}{G3 
} {RO} {GN} Y Y" 
88 PRIN T" {GN} Y YY { G3 }* {RV} S .S . 

Q_ {R0}{GN) Y 



TTTTTTT 0_ 



TTT 

Y" 

90 PRINT"{GN} Y YY {G3 }"*"{RV JMARI 
E .0. Ci Ci Q_ {R0}£_B {GN}Y 

Y" 
92 PRINT"{GN} Y YY {BR}*"{RV} 

{R0}i,[GN}Y{BR 
} {RV} {RO} {GN} Y Y(HM}" 

99 RETURN 

100 REM***** SHARK REVERSE DATA * 

% $i # i\i 

102 IFA=2550RA=OTHENA2=A: RETURN 

104 A2=0:FORP=7TO0STEP-l :Z=INT(A/ 

2tP) 

106 IFZ=OTHENGOT0110 

108 A2=A2+2T(7-P) :A=A-(Z*2TP) 

110 NEXTP:RETURN 



AHOY! 85 



■150 REM** UPDATE SHARK Y ** 

-152 YU=INT(RND(0)*240) : IFYTK170TH 

EN152 

154 POKEV+((2*D)+l) ,YU 

156 RETURN 

200 REM***** UPDATE SHARK X ***** 

202 D=INT(RND(1)*6) : P0KE49395 , D : P 

OKE49396,D*2 

204 P0KE49393,(INT(RND(0)*5)) : POK 

E49394,(5+QQ) 

206 POKE49397,(2TD) : POKE49398 , ( 25 

5-2TD) 

208 SYS49152:SYS49408:G0SUB350:SY 

S49152 

210 SG=PEEK(V+30):SG=PEEK(V+30) :I 

FSG>128ANDSG<192THENGOSUB430:G0TO 

218 

212 IFSG>64ANDSG<128THENP0KEV+21, 

191:GOSUB402:GOSUB550 

214 CY=PEEK(V+16) :CY%=2TD: IFCY=CY 

%ANDPEEK(V+(2*D))>88THENG0SUB150 

216 RETURN / 

218 PRINT" {HM} {CD} {CD} {CD}";TAB(1 

2) ;"{WH}{RV} SHARK GOT YOU! {RO}" 

:DD=DD+l:P0KEK+24,0 

220 F0RI=0T03000: NEXTI 

222 PRINT" {HM} {CD} {CD} {CD} " ;TAB( 1 

2);"{LB}{RV} {RO}" 

:G0T0450 

300 REM***** DIVER FINISHED ***** 

302 IFBA<=OTHENRETURN 

304 WL=WL+WD:WL$=STR$(WL) :WD=0:WD 

$ = "0.00* 1 :BA=0:BA$ = l, 0" 

306 PRINT" {HM}" ;TAB(33-LEN(WL$)); 

"{WH} {RV} NET $";WL$ 
>308 PRINT"{HM} {CD} {WH}{RV} TREASU 

RE # DIVER HAS $0.00" 

310 PRINT"{CD)";SPC(14);"{WH} {RV} 
GOOD WORK! ! " 

312 F0RI=0T03000;NEXTI 

314 PRINT"{HM}{CD}{CD}{CD}";TAB(1 

2);"{LB}{RV} {RO}" 

:G0T0450 

350 REM***** UPDATE TIMER ***** 

352 IFPEEK(V+15)<81THENG0SUB300 

354 DA=DA-(INT(RND(0)*2)+1) 

356 QS=QS+1 :IFQS>150THENQS=0:QQ=Q 

Q+2 

358 IFDA<=OTHENPRINT"{HM} {WH} {RV} 
OUT OF AIR!! " : DD=DD+1 : G0T0378 

360 DA$=STR$(DA) 

362 IFDA<100THENBK=BK+1 : IFBK02TH 

ENBK=1 



364 IFDA<100THENG0SUB420:SYS49152 

:0NBKG0T0370,374 

366 IFDA<200THEN374 

368 IFDA<500THEN372 

370 PRINT"{HM} {WH} {RV} AIR";DA$;" 

LBS. " :G0T0376 
372 PRINT"{HM} {YL} {RV} AIR";DA$;" 

LBS. ":G0T0376 
374 PRINT"{HM) {RD} {RV} AIR";DA$;" 

LBS.[WH} " 
376 RETURN 

378 F0RI=0T03000 : NEXTI : POKEV+21 , 6 
3:G0T0450 

400 REM***** SOUNDS ***** 
402 REM** BEEP ** 

404 POKEK+l,20;POKEK+5,9:POKEK+6, 
248:P0KEK+24,15:P0KEK+4,17 
406 F0RU=1T040 : NEXTU : P0KEK+4 , 16 : F 
ORI=0TO24:P0KEK+I,O: NEXTI: RETURN 
408 REM** GONG ** 
410 FORI=0T022 : POKEK+I , : NEXTI 
412 P0KEK+24,143:P0KEK+5,16:P0KEK 
+19,16 

414 P0KEK+6, 252 :P0KEK+20, 249: POKE 
K+4,21:P0KEK+18,17 

416 P0KEK+1,68:P0KEK+15,42:F0RI=1 
T0200: NEXTI 

418 P0KEK+4,20:P0KEK+18,16:F0RI=1 
T0400: NEXTI: RETURN 
420 REM** ALARM ** 
422 F0RI=0T022:P0KEK+I,0:NEXTI 
424 P0KEK+24,6:P0KEK+5,80:P0KEK+6 
,243:P0KEK+3,4:P0KEK+4,65:SYS4915 
2 

426 F0RI=0T0100STEP4 : POKEK+1 , I : NE 
XTI:P0KEK+4, 64 :FORI=1T050: NEXTI :P 
OKEK+4,64 
428 RETURN 

430 REM** SHARK ATTACK ** 
432 FORI=0TO22 : POKEK+I , : NEXTI 
434 POKEK+24,15:POKEK+5,80:POKEK+ 
6,243:POKEK+3,4:POKEK+4,129 
436 F0RI=0T0140STEP4 : POKEK+1 , I : NE 
XTI:P0KEK+4,1 28 :F0RI=1T050: NEXTI: 
POKEK+4,128 
438 RETURN 

450 REM***** START DIVER ***** 
452 BA = 0:WD=0:WD$="0.00":IFDK=OT 
HEN650 

454 DA=2000:DA$=STR$(DA) :QQ=0:QS= 


456 DY=80:P0KEV+15,DY:POKE(V+16), 
PEEK (V+16) AND 127: POKEV+21, 255 



86 AHOY! 



IMPORTANT 

Before typing in an Ahoy! program, refer to the 
first two pages of the program listings section. 



458 FORXD=OT0170:DN=DN+1:IFDN>1TH 
ENDN=0 

460 P0KEM+7,243+DN:POKEV+14,XD:NE 
XTXD:DI=DI-1 

462 PRINT"{HM) {WHJ {RV} AIR";DA$;" 
LBS. ";TAB(15);"{RV} {GN} DIVERS"; 
DI 

464 PRINT" {HM}";TAB(31-LEN(WL$)); 
"{WH} (RV] NET $";WL$ 
466 BA$="0":PRINT"{HM} {CD} {WH} {RV 
} TREASURE # " 

468 PRINT"{HM} {CD} "TAB( 24-LEN(WD$ 
));"{WH}{RV} DIVER HAS $";WD$: 
G0T0550 
500 REM***** DETERMINE TREASURE * 

™ T *r 'P 

502 GT=PEEK(V+30) 

504 IFGT>191THENP0KE(V+21) ,191:BA 

=BA+1 : G0SUB408 : G0T0508 

506 RETURN 

508 T%=INT(RND(0)*112) :IFT%>56THE 

NT%=0:G0T0514 

510 IFT(T%,1)<>OTHEN508 

512 IFT%>11THENT(T%,1)=1 

514 BA$=STR$(BA):PRINT"{HM} {CD} {W 

H}{RV} TREASURE #";BA$;" " 

516 PRINT"{HM) {CD} {CD}{WH} {RV} Y0 

U FOUND ";T$(T%); M !" 

518 PRINT"{RV} VALUE $" ; T(T% , 0) : I 

FT(T%,0)=0THEN522 

520 WD=VAL(WD$)+T(T%,0) :WD$=STR$( 

WD) 

522 F0RL=0T01500:NEXTL:F0RI=0T022 

:P0KEK+I,0:NEXTI 

524 F0RI=80T0159:P0KES1+I, 160:P0K 

EC1+I,14:NEXTI 

526 PRINT"{HM} { CD } "TAB( 24-LEN(WD$ 

));"{RV} DIVER HAS $";WD$ 

550 REM***** MARK TREASURE ****** 

552 P0KE(V+16),PEEK(V+16)AND191 

554 BY=INT(RND(0)*( 190-236 )+236): 

P0KEV+13.BY 

556 XM=INT(RND(0)*(24-255)+255):P 

0KEV+12,XM:P0KEM+6,246:P0KEV+21,2 

55:RETURN 

600 REM***** MAIN PROGRAM ***** 

602 F0RI=0T05 : P0KEM+I , 240 : NEXTI 

604 F0RI=0T010STEP2:RS=INT(RND(0) 

*255) :POKEV+I,RS:NEXTI 

606 FORD=OT06:GOSUB150:NEXTD:GOSU 

B60:POKEV+21 ,63 

608 PRINT"{HM}{WH}{RV) AIR ";DA$; 

" LBS. ";TAB(15);"{RV){GN}DIVERS" 



;DI 

610 PRINT" {HM}";TAB( 31 -LEN(WL$)); 

"{WH} {RV} NET $";WL$ 

612 BA$="0": PRINT" {HM} {CD} {WH} {RV 

} TREASURE # 0" ; TAB( 27-LEN(WD$) ) ; 

" DIVER HAS $";WD$ 

614 G0SUB450 

616 GOSUB200 : G0SUB500 : SYS49152 

618 G0T0616 

650 REM***** GAME OVER ***** 

652 P0KEV+21,0:PRINTCHR$(147):P0K 

E53280.0 

654 PRINTSPC(9);"{WH}THE SEA HAS 

WON AGAIN!" 

65 6 PRINT" {CD} [CD}";SPC(6) ; "HOWEV 

ER, YOU HAVE RECOVERED;" 

658 PRINT" {CD} { RV } " ; TAB( 19-INT(LE 

N(WL$)/2)); n $ n ;WL$ 

660 PRINT"{CD}";SPC(6) ; "WORTH OF 

ASSORTED TREASURE! !" 

662 IFDD=0THEN670 

664 IFDD=1THENPRINT"{CD}{CD} UN 

FORTUNATELY, YOU LOST A DIVER." :F 

E=12495:G0T0668 

666 PRINT"{CD} {CD} " ; SPC(3) ; "UNFOR 

TUNATELY, YOU LOST" ; DD; "DIVERS ." : 

FE=DD*12495 

668 PRINT"{CD} {CD} " ; SPC( 2) ; "FUNER 

AL EXPENSES WILL COST {RV}$";FE; M 

{CL } . " 

670 NT$=STR$(VAL(WL$)-FE) :IFVAL(N 

T$)<=0THEN676 

672 PRINT" {CD} {CD} " ;TAB( 13) ;"Y0UR 

PROFIT IS" 
674 PRINT"{CD} {RV } " ;TAB( 19-INT(LE 
N<NT$)/2));"$";NT$:GOT0682 
676 IFVAL(NT$)=OTHENPRINT"{CD} {CD 
}";SPC(8);"Y0U DIDN'T MAKE A DIME 
! !":GOT0682 

678 PRINT"{CD}{CD}";TAB(14);"Y0UR 

LOSS IS" 
680 PRINT"{CD} {RV ] " ; TAB( 19-INT(LE 
N(NT$)/2));"$";NT$ 

682 PRINT" {CD} {CD} {CD] " ; SPC( 12) ; " 
PLAY AGAIN (Y/N)?" 
684 GETK$:IFK$=""THEN684 
686 IFK$="Y"THENRUN10 
688 END 

700 REM********** DATA ********** 
702 REM***** SHARK DATA ***** 
704 DATAO , , , , , , , 16 , , , 48 1 
, , 120 , 1 , , 254 , 7 , 127 , 255 , 206 , 223 , 
255,252 

AHOY! 87 



• 706 DATA255,255,248,7,255,156, 252 
,2,14,0,1,3,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
,0,0,0,0 

• 708 DATAO ,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

•710 REM***** DIVER SWIMMING 1 *** 

•712 DAT A 0,0, 128, 0,0, 0,0, 8, 0,0, 128 
, , , , , 2 , , , 40 , 255 , , 43 , 255 , 8 , 
26,138,33 

•714 DATA 10, 138, 128,8, 138, 128,96,0 
,41,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

• 7 16 DATAO ,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
,0,0,0,0,0 

•718 REM***** DIVER SWIMMING 2 *** 
*# 

• 720 DATAO , 32 , , , 1 36 , , , , , , 1 2 
8,0,0,0,0,2,0,0 

• 722 DATA40, 255,0,43, 255,0, 26, 138, 
41,10,138,128,8,138,128,32,0,32 

• 7 24 DAT A 64, 0,8, 0,0, 1,0, 0,0, 0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

•726 REM***** DIVER SWIMMING 3 *** 
*# 

• 728 DATA2 , 0,0,0,0,0,0,32,0,0,2,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,128,0,255,40,32,255,232 
,72,162,164 

•730 DATA 2, 162, 160, 2, 16 2, 3 2, 104,0, 
9,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
,0 

• 732 DATAO , , , , , , , , , 

•734 REM***** DIVER SWIMMING 4 *** 
** 

• 736 DATA2 , 0,0,0,0,0,0,32,0,0,2,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,128,0,255,40,0,255,232, 
104,162,164 

.738 DAT A 2, 162, 160, 2, 16 2, 3 2, 8, 0,8, 
32,0,1,64,0,0,0,0,0 

• 740 DATAO ,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
,0,0,0,0,0, 

•742 REM***** TREASURE DATA ***** 
•744 DATA"A ROCK", 0, "A GOLD CHAIN" 

,800," A SILVER BAR! " ,300, "A GOLD 

BAR!", 1200 
•746 DATA"SOME GOLD COINS !", 1500 , " 

SOME SILVER COINS! ",235 
•748 DATA"SOME LOBSTERS !" ,60, "A BE 

ER CAN", 0, "AN OLD TIRE" ,0 
•750 DATA"A HUMAN SKELETON !", 0, "AN 
OLD SWORD", 15, "A SILVER TRAY!", 3 

00 
•752 DATA"A DIAMOND RING ! *\ 1300, "A 

SOLID GOLD STATUE! !", 9000 
•754 DATA"A RUBY CHALICE! ", 2200 , "A 



N EMERALD BRACELET !", 3200 

756 DATA"A TIMEX WATCH IT TIC 

KS!",2,"A BOX OF JEWELRY !", 8765 

758 DATA" A PLATINUM GOBLET !" ,5600 

,"A '67 CHEVY ENGINE ! " , 35 , " A KITC 

HEN SINK", 6 

760 DATA"A WW II DUD TORPEDO! ",0, 

"A PAIR OF SHOES IN CEMENT !",0 

762 DATA"A LARGE CHEST OF GEMS!!" 

,135742, "A PHONE BOOTH !",0 

764 DATA"A BROKEN COMPUTER" , , "AN 

ANTIQUE SILVER CROSS ! " , 795 , "A TO 
OL BOX", 18 

766 DATA"A SILVER CANDELABRA !", 98 
75, "A CASE OF RARE BRANDY !", 3200 
768 DATA"A BARBERS CHAIR" , 65 , "A J 
ADE THRONE! !", 237865, "A BRASS BED 
",150 

770 DATA"A JEWELED CROWN !!", 12733 
5, "A SIGN 'ATLANTIS 15 KM.M",0 
772 DATA"A GOLD SCEPTER !", 2400 , "A 

DIAMOND TIARA!", 56895, "A GOLD SH 
I ELD! ",4300 

774 DATA"A JEWELED DAGGER" , 1695 , " 
AN OUTBOARD MOTOR" , 95 , "AN OLD RAD 
IAT0R",0 

776 DATA"A JUNKED VOLKSWAGON" , 0, " 
A WW II FIGHTER PLANE! " ,3400," A S 
TEEL DESK",0 

778 DATA"A DENTED COFFEE POT",0," 
A BRASS COMPASS", 135, "A POOL TABL 
E",35 

780 DATA"SOME SILVER CANDLESTICKS 
",450, "AN OLD SODA MACHINE", 23 
782 DATA"A CAST IRON STOVE", 0, "A 
BOX OF BRASS LOCKS" , 85 , "AN EMPTY 
COFFIN !",0 

784 DATA"A SAPPHIRE PENDANT !", 130 
0,"A RUSTED SUIT OF ARMOR", 75 
786 DATA"A CRYSTAL VASE", 40, "A CR 
ATE OF DOORKNOBS", 65, "A SHIPS WHE 
EL",0 
788 REM***** JOYSTICK ML DATA *** 

790 DATA 173, 0,220, 160,80,162,236, 
74 , 176 , 8 , 204 , 1 5 , 208 , 240 , 3 , 206 
792 DATA15, 208,74, 176, 8, 236, 15,20 
8,240,3,238,15,208,74,176,47 
794 DATA1 73, 14, 208, 208, 31, 173, 16, 
208,41,128,208,16,173,16,208,9 
796 DATA 128, 141, 16,208, 169,80, 141 
,14,208,96,234,234,173,16,208,41 
798 DATA1 27, 141, 16, 208, 206, 14, 208 



88 AHOY! 



IMPORTANT 

Before typing in an Ahoy! program, refer to the 
first two pages of the program listings section. 



,162,241, 
800 DATA1 
,238,14,2 
802 DATA2 
128,240,1 
804 DATA1 
6,234,234 
806 DATA1 
,7,208,4, 
808 DATA7 
810 REM** 

812 DATA1 
,192,173, 
814 DATA1 
,244,192, 
816 DATA2 
208,1 
DATA9 
242,1 
DATA1 
208,174,2 
8,22 DATA1 
5,172,243 
824 DATA1 
90,174,24 
826 DATA1 
,17,173,1 
828 DATA2 
,0,208,17 
830 DATA1 
245,192,1 
832 DATA2 



32,13 
76,37 
08,24 
08,20 
3,173 
6,208 
,173, 
6,208 
238,2 
,96,2 



3,192,96 
,162,243 
0,30,169 
8,20,173 
,16,208, 
,169,0,1 
16,208,9 
,96,234, 
55,7,96, 
34,234,0 
HARK X M 



,234, 
,32,1 

,80,2 

,16,2 

41,12 

41,14 

,128, 

234,2 

142,2 

,0 

L DAT 



234,74 

33,192 

05,14 

08,41, 

7,141 

,208,9 

141 

36,255 

55 

A * * * * 



,16 : 
818 
173, 
820 



69,0,1 
241,19 
72,243 
189,0, 
08,45, 
3,245, 
0,174, 
92,208 
6,208, 
44,192 
92,208 
,192,1 
92,254 
4,192, 
73,16, 
6,208, 
08,169 
3,242, 
93,96, 
41,16, 
40,3,7 



62,0,160 
2,240,72 
,192,153 
208,208, 
245,192, 
192,141, 
244,192, 
,202,96, 
45,246,1 
,22 2,0,2 
,179,96, 
53,248,7 
,0,208,2 
221,0,20 
208,45,2 
45,246,1 
,0,174,2 
192,240, 
0,0,173, 
208,173, 
6,6,193, 



,0,206,242 
,169,240 

,248,7,174 

42,173,16 

208,25,173 

16,208,169 

157,0,208, 

0,0,173 

92,141,16, 

08,173,242 

0,0, 169,24 

,174,244 

40,46,169, 

8,208,25 

45, 192,240 

92,141,16 

44,192,157 

3,76,6 

16,208,13, 

242, 192 

96, a, 



BUG REPELLENT LINE 
FOR SALVAGE DIVER 



CODES 



LINE # 1 
LINE # 2 
LINE # 4 
LINE # 6 
LINE # 7 



JC 

CE 
DC 
L0 

PM 
0D 



LINE # 8 
LINE # 10:GM 
LINE # 12:JP 
LINE # 14:MM 
LINE # 16:MP 
LINE # 18:IL 
LINE # 20:MI 
LINE # 22:HI 
LINE # 24:EL 
LINE # 30:AH 



LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 



# 32:MD 

# 34:MJ 

# 36:CN 

# 38:CE 

# 40:LK 

# 50:FJ 

# 52:NF 

# 54:KM 

# 56:FA 

# 58:GP 

# 60: AN 

# 61:NI 

# 62:AP 

# 64:LL 

# 66:DC. 



LINE 


# 


68:GP 


LINE 


# 


70: JF 


LINE 


# 


72:LF 


LINE 


# 


74: AM 


LINE 


§ 


76:AC 


LINE 


# 


78:FP 


LINE 


# 


80:BN 


LINE 


# 


82:PB 


LINE 


# 


84:BN 


LINE 


# 


86:KJ 


LINE 


# 


88:KD 


LINE 


# 


90: AM 


LINE 


# 


92:GC 


LINE 


# 


99:IM 


LINE 


§ 


100:PH 


LINE 


# 


102:01 


LINE 


# 


104:01 


LINE 


# 


106 :KJ 


LINE 


# 


108: OF 


LINE 


# 


1 1 : JP 


LINE 


# 


150:00 


LINE 


# 


152:PJ 


LINE 


# 


154:DB 


LINE 


# 


156:IM 


LINE 


# 


200: CM 


LINE 


# 


202 :EF 


LINE 


# 


204: HE 


LINE 


# 


2 06:GK 


LINE 


# 


2 08 :LE 


LINE 


# 


2 10: GO 


LINE 


# 


2 1 2 : 0B 


LINE 


# 


214:HD 


LINE 


# 


216:IM 


LINE 


# 


218:IA 


LINE 


# 


2 20:DB 


LINE 


# 


222:BM 


LINE 


# 


300: LA 


LINE 


# 


302:PB 


LINE 


# 


304 :JB 


LINE 


# 


306: JG 


LINE 


# 


308 :NK 


LINE 


# 


310:AG 


LINE 


# 


312:DB 


LINE 


# 


314:BM 


LINE 


# 


350 :KP 


LINE 


# 


352:NG 


LINE 


# 


354:JE 


LINE 


# 


356 :DN 


LINE 


# 


358 :0M 


LINE 


# 


360 :PH 


LINE 


# 


362:IM 


LINE 


# 


364:JB 


LINE 


# 


366:KF 



LINE 


# 


368 


:KG 


LINE 


# 


370 


:FB 


LINE 


# 


372 


:LL 


LINE 


# 


374 


:LJ 


LINE 


# 


376 


:IM 


LINE 


# 


378 


:FD 


LINE 


# 


400 


:CN 


LINE 


# 


402 


:EN 


LINE 


# 


404 


:CM 


LINE 


# 


406 


:NN 


LINE 


# 


408 


:HK 


LINE 


# 


410 


:DG 


LINE 


# 


412 


:AN 


LINE 


# 


414 


:GH 


LINE 


# 


416 


:DC 


LINE 


# 


418 


:LG 


LINE 


# 


420 


:KC 


LINE 


# 


422 


:DG 


LINE 


# 


424 


:IL 


LINE 


# 


426 


:ID 


LINE 


# 


428 


:IM 


LINE 


# 


430 


:KJ 


LINE 


# 


432 


:DG 


LINE 


$ 


434 


:HJ 


LINE 


# 


436 


JK 


LINE 


# 


438 


IM 


LINE 


# 


450 


KD 


LINE 


# 


452 


IL 


LINE 


# 


454 


HP 


LINE 


# 


456 


L0 


LINE 


# 


458 


BD 


LINE 


# 


460 


AH 


LINE 


# 


462 


DA 


LINE 


# 


464 


BD 


LINE 


# 


466- 


KH 


LINE 


# 


468: 


10 


LINE 


# 


500: 


EM 


LINE 


# 


502: 


MN 


LINE 


# 


504: 


DB 


LINE 


# 


506: 


IM 


LINE 


# 


508: 


CF 


LINE 


# 


510: 


0J 


LINE 


# 


512: 


DH 


LINE 


# 


514: 


MG 


LINE 


# 


516: 


FO 


LINE 


# 


518: 


JA 


LINE 


# 


5 20: 


DM 


LINE 


# 


522 


IN 


LINE 


# 


524 


AP 


LINE 


# 


526: 


CA 


LINE 


# 


550: 


CO 


LINE 


# 


552: 


OG 


LINE 


# 


554: 


KH 



AHOY! 89 



LINE 


# 


556 


:AC 


LINE 


# 


600 


:LE 


LINE 


# 


602 


:HF 


LINE 


# 


604 


:L0 


LINE 


# 


606 


:NP 


LINE 


# 


608 


:MM 


LINE 


# 


610 


•BD 


LINE 


# 


612 


:KF 


LINE 


# 


614 


•DB 


LINE 


# 


616 


GF 


LINE 


# 


618 


:CJ 


LINE 


# 


650 


10 


LINE 


# 


652 


PD 


LINE 


# 


654 


00 


LINE 


# 


656 


IN 


LINE 


# 


658 


AD 


LINE 


# 


660 


NP 


LINE 


# 


662 


EP 


LINE 


# 


664 


EP 


LINE 


# 


666 


GE 


LINE 


# 


668 


DM 


LINE 


# 


670 


BJ 


LINE 


# 


672 


HD 


LINE 


# 


674 


:0N 


LINE 


# 


676 


:FD 


LINE 


# 


678 


:HC 


LINE 


# 


680 


:JH 


LINE 


# 


682 


:AC 


LINE 


# 


684 


:GN 


LINE 


# 


686 


:0A 


LINE 


# 


688 


:IC 


LINE 


# 


700 


:AL 


LINE 


# 


702 


:BJ 


LINE 


# 


704 


:FC 


LINE 


# 


706 


;PH 


LINE 


# 


708 


:FG 


LINE 


# 


710 


.DB 


LINE 


# 


712 


JJ 


LINE 


# 


714 


OH 


LINE 


# 


716 


BC 


LINE 


# 


718 


GE 


LINE 


# 


720 


EN 


LINE 


# 


722 


.PI 


LINE 


# 


724 


OB 


LINE 


# 


726 


MH 


LINE 


# 


728 


•01 


LINE 


# 


730 


LF 


LINE 


# 


732 


NC 


LINE 


# 


734: 


GC 


LINE 


# 


736: 


OF 


. 



LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE .# 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINES: 



738:FD 
740 :BC 
742:NL 
744:PP 
746:FE 
748:AI 
750: AK 
752:CN 
754:BC 



SOUND 
EXPLORER 



756: 

758: 

7 60: 

762: 

764: 

766: 

768: 

7 70: 

772: 

774: 

776 

778: 

7 80: 

782 

784 



LE 
HN 
PL 
NJ 
BC 
EK 
JP 
JK 
BM 
JK 
DJ 
IB 
CM 
EL 
EO 



786:HD 
788:BE 



790: 

792: 

794: 

796: 

798: 

800: 

802: 

804: 

806: 

808: 

810: 

812: 

814: 

816: 

818: 

820: 

822: 

824 

826 

828 

8 30 

832 

234 



JC 
KH 
OC 
JA 
HG 
OA 
II 
AL 
PG 
JB 
OE 
CG 
DM 
FB 
LB 
FG 
FJ 
OJ 
HL 
LO 
HJ 
BB 



FROM PAGE 

100 REM * 
110 REM * 
120 REM * 
130 P0KE53 
140 PRINT" 
150 DIMV(3 
155 FM=16 
160 GOSUB 
170 GOSUB 
500 FOR X= 
510 FOR Y= 
520 GOSUB 
530 PRINTV 
540 NEXT Y 
550 X=l :Y= 
560 GOSUB 
570 PRINT" 
580 GET T$ 
590 IF T$= 
595 IF T$= 
600 IF T$> 
UB 2100 
605 GOSUB 



D CONTROL DEMO * 

AVID BARRON * 

AHOY! MAGAZINE * 
1:P0KE53281 ,9 



75 

SOUN 

BY D 

FOR 

280, 

[SC}" 

,9) 

CL=255:V=15:CH=7 

2300 

2700 

1 TO 

1 TO 

2000 

(X,Y 

,X 

1 

2000 

{RV}";V(X,Y); 

"" THEN 580 

" " THEN GOSUB 4000 

="0" ANDT$<="9"THEN GOS 

2000:PRINT"(R0}";V(X,Y) 



3 
9 

); 



607 IF 

FM=12 8 

610 IF 

620 

630 

640 

642 

644 

646 

648 

650 

660 

670 

680 

685 

690 

1999 

2000 

2010 

2020 

2030 

2040 

2050 

2060 



T$= If {F7}" 

THEN FM=1 
T$="(CD}" 

T$="(CU)" 
T$="(CR}" 
T$="(CL)" 
T$="[F1}" 
T$="[F3)" 
T$="(F5]" 
T$="(F4)" 
X=4 THEN 
X=0 THEN 
Y=10 THEN 
Y=0 THEN 
T$="{F7)" 
GOTO 560 
STOP 

PRINT"{HM] ( 
FOR Xl=l TO 
PRINT"{CR}" 
NEXT XI 

for yui TO 

PRINT"{CD}" 
NEXT Yl 



IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 

IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 



THEN FM=FM*2:IF 
6 

THEN Y=Y+1 

THEN Y=Y-1 

THEN X=X+1 

THEN X=X-1 

THEN GOSUB 2600 

THEN GOSUB 2620 

THEN GOSUB 2640 

THEN GOSUB 2650 

X = l 
X = 3 

Y = l 
Y = 9 
THEN GOSUB 2300 



CD)"; 
X*9 



90 AHOY! 



IMPORTANT 

Before typing in an Ahoy! program, refer to the 
first two pages of the program listings section. 



READER SERVICE INDEX 



2070 

2100 

'2110 

2120 

2140 

'2160 

•2170 

2180 

2185 

2190 



,2200 
2205 
2 210 
2220 
2225 
.2230 
' 2240 



RETURN 

G0SUB 2000 

PRINT"{R0) •'-; 

G0SUB 2000 

L$=T$ 

PRINTT$; 

PRINT"&" ; 

GET T$ 

IF T$=CHR$(13)THEN 

IF T$<"0" OR T$>"9 



2220 

" THEN 218 



L$=L$+T$ 

PRINTCHR$(157) 

G0T02160 

V(X,Y)=VAL(L$) 

G0SUB 3000 

GOSUB 2000 

PRINT"{R0} 
L}{RV}";V(X,Y); 
2250 RETURN 
2300 PRINT" (HM} M ; 
2310 PRINT" VOICE: 

3" 
2315 PRINT 

2'320 PRINT"ATTACK : " 
2330 PRINT"DECAY :" 
2340 PRINT"SUSTAIN:" 
2345 PRINT"RELEASE:" 
2350 PRINT"HI NOTE:" 
2360 PRINT"L0 NOTE:" 
2370 PRINT"P WIDTH:" 
2380 PRINT"WAVEFRM:" 
2385 PRINT"0N=1 :" 
2390 PRINT"(HM} {CD} {CD} 
D} (CD}{CD} {CD} {CD} {CD) { 
2395 PRINT"V0LUME 
L}(CL}";V 

2397 PRINT"{HM} {CD} {CD} 
D} {CD} {CD} {CD} {CD} {CD} { 

)" 

2400 PRINT"HIGH CUTOFF 

CL} {CL} {CL)";CL 

2410 PEINT"{HM} {CD} {CD} 

D} {CD} {CD} {CD} {CD} {CD} { 

){CD}" 

2412 PRINT"L0W CUTOFF 

CL) {CL} {CL)";CH 

2420 PRINT"{HM} {CD} {CD} 

D} {CD} {CD} (CD) {CD} {CD} { 

}{CD) {CD}" 

2422 PRINT"RES0NANCE 

L} {CL)";RE 

2424 PRINT"{HM} {CD) {CD} 



{CL}{CL] {CL) {C 



1 



{CD} {CD) {C 
CD) [CD}" 
: (CL)(C 

{CD} {CD} {C 
CD} (CD) {CD 

: (CL}{ 

{CD} {CD} {C 
CD} {CD} {CD 

: {CL}{ 

{CD} {CD} {C 
CD} (CD) (CD 

: {CL}{C 

{CD} {CD} {C 



Page No. Company 



Svc. No. 



35 Synapse Software 130 

35 Epyx Computer Software 131 
14 Commodore Software 132 

14 Batteries Included 133 

15 Mirage Concepts 134 

39 Hayden Software 135 
52-69 Protecto Enterprizes 148-165 
50-51 Sight & Sound Music Software 166 
12-13 Activision 167 
C-2 Cardco 168 

5 Mirage Concepts 16° 

7 Commodore 170 

8 DesignVVaie 171 
8 DesignWare 172 

8 DesignWare 173 

9 Sight & Sound Music Software 174 
10 Futurehouse 175 
37 Tech-Sketch Inc. 176 
10 PSIDAC 177 

37 Pronto Software 178 
32 Telesys 179 

9 Signal Computer Consultants 180 

36 Micro-W. D.I. 181 
41 Such-A-I)eal 182 

40 Superior Micro Systems, Inc. 183 
76 M-W Dist. Inc. 184 

27 Micro-Ware 185 

16 Eastern House 186 

38 Cadmean Corporation 187 
4 PLI Micro 188 

6 MSD 189 
C-3 Sub Logic Corporation 190 
C-4 Atari Software 191 

28 Micro Tcchnic Solutions 192 
28 Computer Creations 193 



AHOY! 91 



D) {CD} {CD} (CD) {CD} (CD) [CD J {CD} {CD 

} {CD} {CD} {CD}" 

2426 PRINT"FILTER MODE : {CL}{ 

CL] {CL}"; 

2430 IF FM=16 THEN PRINT"LOWPASS 



2440 IF 
it 



FM = 32 THEN PEINT"BANDPASS 



.2450 IF FM=64 THEN PRINT"HTGHPASS 



■ 2470 

■2480 
FD"; 

.2485 
R) {CR 
}{CR} 
{CR}" 

.2490 
F3) n ; 
2492 , 
R} {CR 
}(CR} 
{CR}" 
2494 
F4)"; 

'2495 
R} {CR 
}{CR} 
{CR}" 

'2 500 
F5)"; 

'2505 
R} {CR 
}(CR} 
{CR}" 
2510 

■2520 
2600 
D} {CD 
}{CD] 
LUME: 
L}{CL 
2602 

'2604 
2606 
2610 

'2620 
D) {CD 
}{CD} 
TOFF 
{CL}{ 
2622 



PRINT" {CU} {CU} {CU} {CU} {CU}"; 
PRINTTAB(21) ;"RANGE:0-15 ( 

PRINT"{CR) {CR} {CR) {CR} {CR} {C 
} {CR} {CR}{CR} {CR} {CR} {CR} [CR 
{CR}{CR} {CR} {CR}{CR} {CR} {CR} 

PRINTTAB(21) ; "RANGE : 0-255 ( 

PRINT" (CR} {CR) {CR} {CR} {CR} {C 
} (CR){CRHCR) (CR) (CR) (CR]{CR 
{CR} {CR} {CR} {CR} [CR) {CR} {CR} 



PRINTTAB(21) ; "RANGE: 0-7 



( 



PRINT" { CR } {CR} {CR} {CR) {CR} {C 
}{CR){CR) {CR} {CR} {CR} (CR) {CR 
{CR] {CR} {CR} (CRHCR) {CR} {CR} 

PRINTTAB(21) ; "RANGE: 0-15 ( 

PRINT" {CR} {CR) (CR) (CR) {CR} {C 
} {CR}{CR} {CR} {CR} {CR} (CR] {CR 
{CR] {CR} {CR} (CR] (CR) {CR} (CR) 

PRINTTAB(21) ;"{CR] {CR} 

(F7)" 

RETURN, 

INPUT" (HM) 

}{CD}{CD){ 

{CD] {CD} {C 



}{CL]{CL}{ 

IF V<0 OR 

GOSUB 2300 

GOSUB 3000 

RETURN 

INPUT"{HM} 

}{CD}{CD}{ 

(CD) [CD] {C 

LEVEL: 

CL} {CL]{CL 

IF CL<0 OR 



{CD} (CD) {CD} (CD) {C 
CD} {CD} {CD} (CD] {CD 
D) (CD)ENTER NEW VO 
(CL) (CL) {CL} (CL] (C 
CL}{CL}";V 
V>15 THEN 2600 



(CD) {CD} (CD}(CD] {C 
CD} (CD) {CD} {CD} {CD 
D) {CD}ENTER NEW CU 
{CL} {CL} {CL} 
] {CL} {CL}(CL}";CL 
CL>255 THEN 2620 



•2624 GOSUB 2300 

•2626 GOSUB 3000 

•2630 RETURN 

•2640 INPUT" {HM] {CD} { CD } {CD} {CD } (C 

D} {CD} {CD} (CD) {CD} {CD] {CD} {CD} {CD 

} (CD) {CD} {CD} (CD] (CD)ENTER NEW RE 

SONANCE: (CL) { CL } { CL } { CL 

}{CL} {CL} {CL} [CL]{CL} {CL}";RE 
•2642 IF RE<0 OR RE>15 THEN 2640 
•2644 GOSUB 2300 
•2646 GOSUB 3000 
.2650 INPUT" {HM} ( CD ] { CD } { CD } { CD} {C 

D] (CD} {CD} {CD} {CD} (CD) {CD) {CD} (CD 

] {CD} {CD} {CD}(CD]{CD)ENTER NEW CU 

TOFF LEVEL: {CL} {CL} {CL} 

{CL} {CL} {CL} [CL] (CL) (CL) {CL}";CH 

2652 IF CH<0 OR CH>15 THEN 2650 

2654 GOSUB 2300 

2656 GOSUB 3000 

2660 RETURN 

2670 RETURN 

2 700 REM 

2710 PRINT"{HM}{CD}{CD) {CD} {CD} {C 

D] (CD) {CD) (CD) {CD} {CD} {CD} {CD} {CD 

}{CD} {CD}{CD} (CD}{CD) M 

2720 PRINT"WAVEFORMS: U 

SE CURSOR CONTROL" 

2730 PRINT" 0=NOISE T 

MOVE CURSOR." 

2740 PRINT" 1=PULSE H 

IT NUMBER TO" 

2750 PRINT" 2=SAWT00TH C 

HANGE DATA." 

2760 PRINT" 3=TRIANGLE" 

2770 PRINT" <SPACEBAR CONTROLS E 

NVELOPE TRIGGER>"; 

2780 RETURN 

FOR X2=l TO 3 
FOR Y2=l TO 9 
IF V(X2,Y2)<0 THEN V(X2,Y2)= 



3000 
3010 

3020 



3030 

3040 

3050 

15 

3060 

3070 

255 

3080 

255 

3090 

=4095 

3100 IF 



NEXT Y2 

FOR Y2=l TO 4 

IF V(X2,Y2)>15THEN V(X2,Y2)= 



NEXT Y2 
IF V(X2 



IF 



IF 



5)>255 THEN V(X2,5)= 
V(X2,6)>255 THEN V(X2,6)= 
V(X2,7)>4095 THEN V(X2,7) 
V(X2,8)>4 THEN V(X2,8)=4 



92 AHOY! 



IMPORTANT 

Before typing in an Ahoy' program, refer to the 
first two pages of the program listings section. 



3110 

3120 

3140 

3150 

16+V( 

3160 

16 + V( 

3170 

3180 

3190 

,7)/2 

3200 

INT(V 

3210 

3 2 20 

3230 

3240 

32 50 

3260 

3270 

32 80 

32 90 

4000 

4010 

4020 

4030 

4040 

4050 

4060 

4070 

4080 

4090 

4100 

4110 

4120 



IF V( 

NEXT 

FOR X 

POKE 

X2.2) 

POKE 

X2,4) 

POKE 

POKE 

POKE 

56) 

POKE 

(X2.7 

T=2T( 

T=T+( 

POKE 

NEXT 

POKE 

POKE 

POKE 

POKE 

RETUR 

FOR X 

T=2T( 

T=T+( 

POKE 

NEXT 

GET T 

IF T$ 

FOR X 

T=2T( 

T=T+( 

P0KE5 

NEXT 

RETUR 



X2,9)>1 THEN V(X2,9)=1 

X2 

2=1 TO 3 

54277+(X2-l)*7,V(X2,l)* 

54278+(X2-l)*7, V(X2,3)* 



54272+ 
54273+ 
54275+ 

54274+ 

)/256) 

7-V(X2 

1-V(X2 

54276+ 

X2 

54296, 

54295, 

54293, 

54294, 

N 

2=1 TO 

7-V(X2 

1-V(X2 

54276+ 

X2 

$ 

It It rpr, 

2 = 1 TO 
7-V(X2 
1-V(X2 
4276+( 

X2 
N 



(X2-1)*7,V(X2,6) 
(X2-1)*7,V(X2,5) 
(X2-1)*7,INT(V(X2 

(X2-1)*7,V(X2,7)- 

*256 

,8)) 

,9))*8 

(X2-1)*7,T 

V+FM 

RE*16+7 

CH 

CL 

3 
,8)) 
,9))*8 

(X2-1)*7,T+1 



EN 4050 

3 
,8)) 
,9))*8 
X2-1)*7,T 



BUG REPELLENT LiNE CODES 



FOR SOUND EXPLORER 

LINE # 100:JF LINE 

LINE # 110:LF LINE 

LINE # 120:CJ LINE 

LINE # 130:CB LINE 

LINE # 140:HH LINE 

LINE # 150:ME LINE 

LINE # 155:IL LINE 

LINE # 160:F0 LINE 

LINE # 170:FK LINE 

LINE # 500 :JF LINE 

LINE # 510:KC LINE 

LINE # 520:FL LINE 

LINE # 530:FN LINE 



# 540 :GA 

# 550 :LM 
560 :FL 
570 :PP 
580 :BI 
590 :FD 
595:AE 

# 600: NO 

# 605 :BA 

# 607 :F0 

# 610: NB 

# 620:HF 

# 630 :AJ 



LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 



# 
# 
# 
# 
# 

# 

# 
# 

# 
# 
# 
# 

# 

# 
# 
# 
# 

# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 

# 
# 
# 
# 

# 
# 

# 

# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 

# 



640 

642 

644 

646 

648 

650 

660 

670 

680 

685 

690 

1999 

2000 

2010 

2020 

2030 

2040 

2 050 

2 060 

2 07 

2100 

2110 

2120 

2140 

2160 

2170 

2180 

2185 

2190 

2 200 

2 205 

2210 

2 220 

2225 

2 2 30 

2240 

2250 

2300 

2310 

2315 

2 3 20 

2330 

2340 

2345 

2350 

2 360 

2 3 70 

2380 

2385 

2390 

2395 

2397 



KF 

IG 

KN 

KA 

JG 

LG 

KE 

NK 

LE 

JC 

CL 
JC 
DE 
MO 
DG 
AM 
PI 
DC 
BH 
IM 
FL 
EL 
FL 
KA 
FB 
MA 
BI 
JG 
OF 
MJ 
JK 
FC 
NH 
FE 
FL 
LA 
IM 
CE 
NM 
JJ 
AL 
MC 
GB 
AP 
BC 
BM 
CL 
DO 
IE 
LK 
KP 
NP 



2400 :PJ 



LINE # 2410:PP 
LINE # 2412:CA 
LINE # 2420:CG 
LINE # 2422:EM 
LINE # 2424:D0 
LINE # 2426:AB 
LINE # 2430:BB 
LINE # 2440:EB 
LINE # 2450:HJ 
LINE # 2470:0D 
LINE # 2480:CB 
LINE # 2485:MN 
LINE # 2490: EC 
LINE # 2492:MN 
LINE # 2494:A0 
LINE # 2495:MN 
LINE # 2500 :PN 
LINE # 2505:MN 
LINE # 2510:10 
LINE # 2520:IM 
LINE # 2600:GA 
LINE # 2602:FK 
LINE # 2604 :F0 
LINE # 2606 :FE 
LINE # 2610:IM 
LINE # 2620:MA 
LINE # 2622:CC 
LINE # 2624:F0 
LINE # 2626:FE 
LINE # 2630:IM 
LINE # 2640:HD 
LINE # 2642-.OB 
LINE # 2644:F0 
LINE # 2646:FE 
LINE # 2650:LM 
LINE # 2652:LE 
LINE # 2654:FO 
LINE # 2656:FE 
LINE # 2660:IM 
LINE # 2670:IM 
LINE # 2700:JD 
LINE # 2710:ID 
LINE # 2720:KO 
LINE # 2 7 30 :HL 
LINE # 2740:AH 
LINE # 2750:FC 
LINE # 2760:KG 
LINE # 2770:CA 
LINE # 2780:IM 
LINE # 3000: NO 
LINE # 3010:NL 
LINE # 3020:HN 
LINE # 3030 :BG 



AHOY! 93 



LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINK 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 



# 3040: MA 

# 3 050: NO 

# 3060: BG 

# 3070: IE 

# 3 080 :FG 

# 3090: NL 

# 3100:E0 

# 3110:DG 

# 3120: AL 

# 3140:N0 

# 3150:LM 

# 3160:KP 

# 3170:MF 

# 3180:JN 

# 3 190: CO 

# 3 200:MH 

# 3210:NB 

# 3220:KP 

# 3230:FF 

# 3240:AL 



LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINES 



3250:HL 
3 260:GH 
3270:FJ 
3 280:FC 
3 2 90 :IM 
4000: NO 
4010 :NB 
4020 :KP 
4030 :BF 
4040: AL 
4050 :BI 
4060: HA 
4070: NO 
4080 :NB 
4090 :KP 
4100:FF 
4U0:AL 
4120:IM 
170 



THE CASTLE 
OF DARKNESS 

FROM PAGE 46 

7 REM RD=R00M DIRECTION TABLE. C 
W$=COMMAND WORD TABLE. RN$=ROOM 
NAMES 

8 REM RC=ROOM CONTENTS TABLE. KS 
=KEYSTR0KE TABLE 

10 DIM RD(14,8),CW$(16) ,RN$(60) ,R 
C(14),KS(64) 
20 GOSUB 1000 
25 GOSUB 970 

27 REM 

28 REM SET UP BLANK LINES AND POS 
ITION STRINGS 

29 REM 

30 BL$="{HM} {H 
M)" 

31 RL$="{HM} {CD} {CD}":FOR 1=1 TO 
78:RL$=RL$+" " : NEXT : RL$=RL$+" { HM) 
{CD} {CD}" 

32 DL$="(HM) {CD} {CD} {CD} (CD} {CD}" 
90 XR=1 :PR=1:G0SUB 320 

97 REM 

98 REM MAIN LOOP. GET KEYSTROKE 
FIRST 

99 REM 

100 GOSUB 990 

105 PRINT BL$CW$(CM) :IF CM=0 THEN 
100 



110 IF CM<9 THEN GOSUB 300:G0T0 1 

00 

115 IF CM=9 THEN GOSUB 390:GOTO 1 

00 

180 PRINT BL$CW$(CM) 

190 GOTO 100 

297 REM 

298 REM MOVEMENT HANDLER 

299 REM 

300 XX=XR:XR=PR:PR=RD(XR,CM) 
30 7 REM 

308 REM IS IT AN ILLEGAL MOVEMENT 
? 

309 REM 

310 DS$="":IF PR>49 THEN DS$=RN$( 
PR):PR=XR:XR=XX 

317 REM 

318 REM SET ROOM NAME TO PRESENT 
ROOM 

319 REM 

320 RN$=RN$(PR) 

327 REM 

328 REM CLEAR SCREEN AND PRINT RO 
OM NAME AND MESSAGE 

329 REM 

330 PRINT "{SC}"CW$(CM)RL$RN$DL$D 
S$ 

340 RETURN 
348 DY. 

387 REM 

388 REM BACK COMMAND HANDLER 

389 REM 

390 XX=PR:PR=XR:XR=XX:RN$=RN$(PR) 
:DS$="":G0T0 330 

967 REM 

968 REM RANDOMLY CHOOSE LOCATION 
OF TREASURE ROOM 

969 REM 

970 R=INT(10*RND(9)) :IF R>2 THEN 
R = 3 

971 IF R=l THEN R=0 

972 ON R GOTO 975,980,985 

975 X=2+INT(2*RND(9)):RD(10,X)=14 

: RETURN 

980 RD(12,6)=14:RETURN 

985 X=1+INT(8*RND(9)) :R=13:IF RD( 
R,X)=55 THEN RD( R , X )= 14 : RETURN 

986 GOTO 985 

990 A=PEEK(197) :IF A=M THEN 990 
995 CM=KS(A):RETURN 

997 REM 

998 REM SET UP COMMAND WORD ARRAY 

999 REM 



94 AHOY! 



IMPORTANT 

Before typing in an Ahoy! program, refer to the 
first two pages of the program listings section. 



1000 FOR 1=0 TO 16: READ A$:CW$(I) 

=A$:NEXT 

1010 DATA "WHAT?", "NORTH", "SOUTH" 

, "EAST" , "WEST" , "UP" , "DOWN" , "IN" , " 

OUT", "BACK" 

1015 DATA "TAKE", "LEAVE", "PEER"," 

GOT?" , "QUIT" , "HELP" , "HELP" 

1047 REM 

1048 REM SET UP KEYSTROKE ARRAY 

1049 REM 

1050 FOR 1=0 TO 64:KS(I)=0:NEXT 
1055 FOR 1=1 TO 16:READ A:KS(A)=I 
:NEXT 

1060 DATA 39,13,14,9,30,18,33,38, 
28,22,42,41,26,62,29,55 

1097 REM 

1098 REM SET UP RD (ROOM DIRECTIO 
N TABLE) AND RN$ (ROOM NAME TABLE 

) 

1099 REM 

1100 FOR 1=1 TO 14:kEAD A$:RN$(I) 
=A$:FOR J=l TO 8:READ A:RD(I,J)=A 
:NEXT:NEXT 

1110 DATA "CASTLE MAIN GATE", 52, 5' 

3,3,2,51 ,50,53,50 

1115 DATA "MEADOW WEST OF CASTLE" 

,1,4,51 ,52,51,50,51,50 

1120 DATA "LEDGE EAST OF CASTLE", 

1,54,54,51,51,51,51,50 

1125 DATA "GROVE SOUTH OF CASTLE" 

,51,54,54,2,51,5,53,50 

1130 DATA "KITCHEN", 6, 4, 9, 6, 50, 13 

,9,4 

1135 DATA "COURTYARD", 7, 5, 9, 12, 7, 

5,9,7 

1140 DATA "GATEHOUSE", 56, 6, 8, 8, 8, 

6, 6,56 

1145 DATA "ON THE WALLS" , 7 , 10, 10 , 

7,57,51 ,7,50 

1150 DATA "GREAT HALL" , 6 , 50 , 50 , 5 , 

10,13,5,6 

1155 DATA "COUNT'S CHAMBER" , 8 , 55 , 

55,8,11,9,50,8 

1160 DATA "TOWER TOP" , 54 , 54 , 54 , 54 

,57,10,50,50 

1165 DATA "THE STABLES" , 50 , 50 , 6 , 5 

0,50,55,50,6 

1170 DATA "THE DUNGEONS" , 55 , 55 , 55 

,55,9,55,50,50 

1175 DATA "TREASURE ROOM" , 50 , 50 , 5 

0,50,50,50,50,50 

1197 REM 

1198 REM SET UP RN$ VALUES FOR IL 



LEGAL MOVEMENT DIRECTIONS 

• 1199 REM 

•1200 FOR 1=50 TO 57:READ A$:RN$(I 

)=A$:NEXT 
.1210 DATA "SORRY, BUT WE CAN'T GO 

THAT WAY" 
•1215 DATA "IT'S TOO STEEP FOR US 

TO CLIMB" 
•1220 DATA "WE'LL JUST GET LOST IF 

WE WANDER IN THE WOODS" 
•1225 DATA "I'M KNOCKING, BUT NOBO 

DY ANSWERS" 
.1230 DATA "ARE YOU TRYING TO GET 

US KILLED?" 
.1235 DATA "I SEARCHED THERE, FOUN 

D NOTHING, AND CAME BACK" 
.1240 DATA "WE DON'T HAVE WHAT IT 

TAKES TO GET IN THERE" 
.1245 DATA "UP FROM HERE? DO YOU 

THINK YOU CAN FLY?" 

* 1990 RETURN 



BUG REPELLENT 
FOR THE CASTLE 

LINE # 7:GA 
# 



LINE 
LINE 
LINE- 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
L-INE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 



8:NF 
10:PK 
20:F0 
25:DA 



27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32: 

90: 

97 

98: 

99: 

100. 

105: 

110: 

115: 

180: 

190:CF 

297:JD 



JD 
:FH 

JD 

DO 

EJ 

AN 

NC 

JD 

GA 

JD 
DG 
KP 
DN 
AN 
PL 



298 
299 
3 00 
307 
3 08 
3 09 
310 



AF 
JD 
EC 
JD 
CO 
JD 
IN 



LINE CODES 
OF DARKNESS 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 

LINE # 



317:JD 
318: DM 
319:JD 
3 20 :CG 
327: JD 
328:DA 
329:JD 
330 :0J 
340: IM 
348: MM 
387:JD 
388:KA 
389:JD 



3 90 

967 

968 

969 

9 70 

971:KC 

972: JG 



AF 
JD 
LG 
JD 
GA 



975: 
980: 
985: 
986: 

9 90 



HF 
IB 
KE 
DI 

EM 



995:EG 
997:JD 
998:PI 

999: JD 



AHOY! 95 



LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 



# 

# 
# 

# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 
# 



1000 

1010: 

1015: 

1047 

1048 

1049 

1050 

1055 

1060 

1097 

1098: 

1099 

1100 

1110 

1115 

1120: 

1125: 

1130: 

1135: 

1140: 

1145: 



EL 
FK 
IB 
JD 
HD 
JD 
NI 
AI 
PJ 
JD 
NH 
JD 
JI 
PP 
PH 
IP 
KB 
MJ 
GM 
MK 
CJ 



LINE 
LINE 
LINE 

LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINE 
LINES 



1150 

1155 

1160 

1165 

1170 

1175 

1197 

1198 

1199 

12 00 

1210 

1215 

1220 

1225:KG 

1230:KF 

1235 

1240 

1245 

1990 

98 



IF 
JP 
BK 
DF 
AD 
AD 
JD 
LF 
JD 
DH 
IM 
PK 
JI 



HB 
AC 
GM 
IM 



BASE 
CONVERSIONS 

FROM PAGE 77 

1 {JEM**************************** 

A A ife m «c sfe 

2 REM*THIS PROGRAM WILL EXCHANGE 
BINARY 

3 REM*HEXADECIMAL AND DECIMAL NOT 
ATION 

4 REM* LINES 10 - 80 DISPLAY THE 
MENU * AND GET THE FUNCTIO 
N NUMBER 

5 REM** *********** AAAAiJcAAAAAsjeA^cAA 
4t sfesfe sfe *3J! 

6 P0KE53281,7:N$="":E$="" 

7 PRINT"(SC) {CD) {CD} {CD) {CD) {CD}{ 
RV}" 

8 PRINT E$ 

10 PRINT"{RV){RD)CHOSE A FUNCTION 

1-7{R0) [BL)" 

20 PRINT"1 BINARY TO DECIMAL" 

30 PRINT"2 BINARY TO HEXADECIMAL" 

40 PRINT"3 HEXADECIMAL TO DECIMAL 
ii 

50 PRINT"4 HEXADECIMAL TO BINARY" 

60 PRINT"5 DECIMAL TO BINARY" 

70 PRINT"6 DECIMAL TO HEXADECIMAL 

75 PRINT"7 EXIT":INPUT A:IF(A>7)0 



R(A<1)THENE$="N0NEXISTANT FUNCTIO 

N":GOTO 7 
•77 IF A=7 THEN END 

•80 PRINT"ENTER YOUR NUMBER" : E$="" 
•81 REM*************************** 

****** * THE NEXT FEW LINES 

ACCEPT THE 
•82 REM* VALUE INTO A STRING VARIA 
BLE * AND SEND IT TO THE 

SUBROUTINES 
•83 REM* FOR CONVERSION 

if. Jfi jf. J|C 3jC if. Jp JJZ JJi- *P 3p ^ *p *}w rf|i- Jp 3^ 3p sy, 3^C 

************* 

•90 INPUT N$:ON A GOSUB 1000,200,1 
200,400,1300,1100 

95 PRINT" {SC) (RV) (RD) {CD) {CD) {CD} 
{CD} {CD} (CR) (CR)THE ANSWER IS "N$ 
:PRINT:PRINT"{GN}PRESS ANY KEY TO 

GO TO MENU" 

96 GETXZ$:IFXZ$=""THEN G0T096 

97 GOTO 7 

200 GOSUB 1000 
GOSUB 1100 
RETURN 
GOSUB 1200 
GOSUB 1300 
RETURN 
REM************************* 



210 
2 20 
400 
410 
420 

1000 
***** 

1005 REM*THIS SUBROUTINE CONVERTS 
REM* BINARY TO DECIMAL 
RgM************:; ************ 



1010 
1015 

1020 

1030 
RGE" 
1035 
1040 



L=LEN(N$):DN=0:D$="" 

IF L>16 THEN E$="DATA TOO LA 

GOTO 7 

F0RX=1 TO L 

IFN0T(MID$(N$,X,l)="0"ORMID$ 
(N$,X,1)="1")THEN E$="BAD BIN DAT 
A": GOTO 7 
1045 NEXT 

FOR X=LT01 STEP-1 

CH$=MID$(N$,X,1) 

CH = 

IF CH$="1" THEN CH=1 

DN =DN+(2T(L-X)*CH) 

NEXT X 

N$=STR$(DN):F0RX=1 TO LEN(N$ 



1050 
1055 
1060 
1065 
1070 
1075 
1080 

) 
1085 



"THEN 



IF NOT MID$(N$,X,1)=" 
D$=D$+MID$(N$,X,1) 
1090 NEXT:N$=D$:RETURN 
1 100 REM************************* 



96 AHOY! 



IMPORTANT 

Before typing in on Ahoy! program, refer to the 
first two pages of the program listings section. 



REM*DECIMAL TO HEXADECIMAL 

J^gf^***** ******************** 



*r ™ *f* *T ™ TT T 4 

•1101 REM*THIS SUBROUTINE WILL CON • 

VERT 
•1102 

•1103 

***** 

* 1104 L=LEN(N$) 

•1105 FOR X=l TO L:C$=MID$(N$,X,1) 

. 1110 IFASC(C$)<480RASC(C$)>57THEN 

E$="ILLEGAL DECIMAL DATA":G0T0 7 
•1115 NEXT X:IF VAL(N$ ) >65535THEN 

E$="NUMBER TOO LARGE" : GOTO 7 
.1120 D=VAL(N$):ND=1:N$="" 

IF 16tND>=D+lTHEN GOTO 
ND=ND+1:G0T0 1125 
FOR X=ND TO 1 STEP-1 
C=INT(D/16T(X-1)) 
D=D~C*16T(X-1) 
IF C=15 THEN N$=N$+"F" 
C = 14 THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
D$="" 



1135 



IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 
IF 



C=13 
C-12 

C=ll 
C=10 
C<10 



NEXT X 



N$=N$+"E" 
N$=N$+"D" 
N$=N$+"C" 
N$=N$+"B" 
NS=N$+"A" 
N$=N$+STR$(C) 
FOR X=l TO LEN 



• 1125 

.1130 
•1135 
•1145 
•1150 
•1155 
•1160 

• 1165 
•1170 
•1175 
•1180 

• 1185 
•1190 

(N$) 
•1195 IFN0TMID$(N$,X,1)=" "THEND$= 

D$+MID$(N$,X,1) 
•1196 NEXT:N$=D$:RETURN 

• 1200 REM************************* 

jfe jfe jfe sfe sfc jfc 

•1201 REM* THIS SUBROUTINE WILL CO 
NVERT * HEXADECIMAL TO D 

ECIMAL 

• 1202 REM************************* 

•1204 F0RX=1 TO LEN(N$) : D$=MID$(N$ 

X 1 ) 
•1205 IFASC(D$)<48 OR ASC(D$)>70TH 

ENE$="ILLEGAL HEX DATA":G0T0 7 
•1206 IFASC(D$)<65ANDASC(D$)>57 TH 
EN E$="ILLEGAL HEXADECIMAL DATA" 
GOTO 7 
•1207 IF LEN(N$)>4 THEN E$="NUMBER 
TOO LARGE" :G0T0 7 

• 1208 NEXT 

• 1209 N=0:D$ = "" 

•1210 FOR X=0 TO LEN(N$)-1 
•1215 CH$=MID$(N$,LEN(N$)-X,1) 
•1220 IF CH$="F" THEN F=15 
•1225 IF CH$="E" THEN F=14 
•1230 IF CH$="D" THEN F=13 



1235 IF CH$ 

1240 IF CH$ 

•1245 IF CH$ 

•1250 IF ASC 

$ ) 

•1255 N=N+F* 

•1260 NEXT X 

•1265 N$=STR$(N) 

•1270 FOR X=l TO 

•1280 IFNOT MID$ 

$=D$+MID$(N$,X, 

•1285 NEXT:N$=D$ 

•1299 REM******* 

^ ™ i ^; ^ ^ jk 

WILL CONVERT 
•1300 REM* DECIM 

t'*t tV ""V "•'*" *•]•* *~r tfr tV tY tV **|t "fa tfr 



= "C" THEN F=12 
="B" THEN F=ll 
="A" THEN F=10 
(CH$)<58 THEN F=VAL(CH 

16TX 



LEN(N$) 
(N$,X,1)=" "THEN D 

1) 

:RETURN 
****************** 

* THIS SUBROUTINE 
AL TO BINARY 



•1301 F0RX=1 TO LEN(N$) 

• 1302 IFASC(MID$(N$,X,1))>570RASC( 

MID$(N$,X,1))<48THEN E$="BAD DEC 

DATA":G0T07 
•1303 NEXT:IFVAL(N$)>65535THEN E$= 

"NUMBER TOO LARGE": GOTO 7 
•1309 BC=0:C=VAL(N$) :N$="" 

IF 2TBC<C THEN BC=BC+1:G0T0 



•1310 

1310 

•1315 

•1320 

• 1325 

• 1330 
•1335 

• 1340 
•1345 
•1350 



FOR X=0 TO BC 

C$="l" 

IF C<2TBC THEN C$="0" 

IF C>=2?BC THEN C=C-2 

BC=BC-1 

N$=N$+C$ 

NEXT X 

RETURN 



BC 



BUG REPELLENT LINE CODES 
FOR BASE CONVERSIONS (C-64) 



LINE 


# 


l:EO 


LINE 


# 


2:FI 


LINE 


# 


3:MN 


LINE 


# 


4:FP 


LINE 


# 


5:EO 


LINE 


# 


6:FH 


LINE 


# 


7:NL 


LINE 


# 


8:AP 


LINE 


# 


10: LB 


LINE 


# 


20:NI 


LINE 


# 


30: PL 


LINE 


# 


40:DF 


LINE 


# 


50:HB 


LINE 


# 


60:AA 


LINE 


# 


70:00 



LINE 


# 


75:BA 


LINE 


# 


77:OC 


LINE 


# 


80: HA 


LINE 


# 


81:DE 


LINE 


# 


82:CK 


LINE 


# 


83:DJ 


LINE 


# 


90: AC 


LINE 


# 


95:MD 


LINE 


# 


96:LM 


LINE 


# 


97:MC 


LINE 


# 


200:F0 


LINE 


# 


210: FH 


LINE 


# 


2 20:IM 


LINE 


# 


400: FA 


LINE 


# 


410:FB 




AHOY! 97 



GRAPHICS PROGRAMS 

F0R"mEC-64 

AND 

VIC 20 



IN- 




LINE # 

LINE # 
LINE ■# 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE #■ 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 



420: IM 

1000 :NK 

1005: EG' 

10 10: PC 

1015:KF 

1020: 

1030: 

1035: 

1040: 

1045:IA 

1050 :DB 

1055: 

1060: 

1065: 

1070; 

1075: 

1080: 

1085: 

1090: 

1100: 

1101: 

1102; 

1103; 

1104: 

1105; 

1110: 

1115: 



DC 
PD 

KM 
FK 



;MP 
;GM 
;IG 
;MA 
;NK 
;EE 
:AE 
:C0 
;DD 
;FJ 
:IE 
:NK 
;JP 
:KA 
;NN 
;EB 



11 20: ML 



1125; 

1130; 

1135; 

1145; 

1150: 

1155; 

1160; 

1165; 

1170:HC 

1175:G0 

1180:F0 

1185:DM 

1190:GL 

1195:AE 



MG 

EP 

IL 

LH 

FC 

:H0 

;G0 

;JC 





THE EMERALD 
ELEPHANT 

OFGPANGU 

ADVENTURE GAME 



LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE .# 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
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LINE # 
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LINE # 
LINE # 
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LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINES: 



1196:CO 

1200:CE 

1201; 

1202; 

1204: 

1205: 

1206: 

1207; 

1208; 

1209: 

1210: 

1215: 

1220; 

1225:JJ 

1230:JN 

1235; 

1240 

1245: 

1250: 

1255: 

1260: 

1265: 

1270: 

1280: 

1285: 

1299: 

1300: 

1301: 

1302: 

1303 :KJ 

1309: LI 

1310:HK 

1315:0B 

1320:JG 

1325: DA 

1330:KL 

1335:IF 

1340:JM 

1345:NK 

1350:IM 

112 



MM 
CE 
LD 
FC 

KE 
HK 
IA 
00 
NO 
DN 
KF 



:KJ 
;IN 
:IB 
:PA 

:FF 

NK 

IA 

;NK 

:AE 

;C0 

DJ 

;ID 

:NK 

:0M 



BUG REPELLENT LINE CODES 
FOR BASE CONVERSIONS (VIC 20) 

LINE # 1:E0 LINE # 7:NL 

LINE # 2:PN LINE # 8:AG 

LINE # 3:0D LINE # 10:KE 

LINE # 4:PK LINE # 20:KB 

LINE # 5:E0 LINE # 30:GG 

LINE # 6:FH LINE # 40:0A 



LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 



5 
60 
70 
75 
77 
80 
81 
82 
83 
90 
95 
96 
97 
20 
21 
22 
40 
41 
42 
10 
10 



IK 
HL 

ND 

DN 

NJ 

OL 

MI 

KH 

EO 

PJ 

JE 

MM 

ME 

:FP 

:FE 

:IM 

:FJ 

:FG 

:IM 



NK 
MM 
CE 
KF 
DC 
HC 
LB 
KF 
IA 
EI 



1010 

1015; 

1020 

1030: 

1035: 

1040: 

1045: 

1050: 

1055: MP 

1060:GM 

1065: 

1070: 

1075: 

1080: 

1085: 

1090 

1100: 

1101: 

1102:10 

1103:NK 

1104:JP 

1105:EK 

1110:JP 

1115:KJ 

11 20: ML 

1125:MG 

1130:E0 

1135:11 

1145:LH 

1150:FC 



GK 

JD 

NM 

EH 

LL 

:C0 

;DD 

:FJ 



WORD PROCESSING 

AND 

40-COLUMN 

VIC PROGRAMS 

AND MORE 



*M 



LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE # 
LINE .# 
LINES: 



1155 

1160 

1165 

1170 

1175 

1180 

1185 

1190 

1195 

1196 

1200 

1201 

1202 

1204 

1205 

1206 

1207 

1208 

1209 

1210 

1215 

1220 

1225 

1230 

1235 

1240 

1245 

1250 

1255 

1260 

1265 

1270 

1280 

1285 

1299 

1300 

1301 

1302 

1303 

1309 

1310:MJ 

1315:0P 

1320 

1325 

1330 

1335 

1340 

1345 

1350 

112 



;GI 
:GI 
:HI 
;EI 
:EI 
:DI 
;CD 
:KD 
:NG 
;C0 
;CE 
:DP 
:CE 
:L0 
:FP 
;L0 
:C0 
:IA 
:00 
:MJ 
:DN 
;IP 
:LF 
:IH 
:KF 
:JP 
:GF 
:NE 
:FF 
;NM 
;IA 
;0P 
:PN 
;C0 
;CF 
:AC 
;0P 
;BD 
;AM 
;LI 



JG 
OP 
FN 
IF 

JM 

NM 
IM 



\ 



Simulator E 



x 



fy 









Put yourself in the pilot's seat of a Piper 181 Cherokee Archer for an awe-inspiring flight over realistic scene 
from New York to Los Angeles. High speed color-filled 3D graphics will give you a beautiful panoramic vie., 
as you practice takeoffs, landings, and aerobatics. Complete documentation will get you airborne quickly 
even if you've never flown before. When you think you're ready, you can play the World War I Ace aerial battle 
game. Right Simulator II features include * animated color 3D graphics ■ day, dusk, and night flying mod 
■ over 80 airports in four scenery areas: New York; Chicago, Los Angeles, Seattle, with additional scenery 
areas available ■ user-variable weather, from clear blue skies to grey cloudy conditions ■ complete flight 
Instrumentation ■ VOR, ILS, ADF, and DME radio equipped ■ navigation facilities and course plotting ■ World 
War I Ace aerial battle game ■ complete Information manual and flight handbook. 



See your dealer . . . 

or lor direct orders enclose S49.95 plus $2.00 lor shipping and specify UPS 

■ class mall delivery / xpress. Diner's Club, MasterCa I 

Visa accepted. 

Order Line: 800 / 637-4983 








LOGIC 



Corporation 
713 Edgebrook Drive 
Champaign IL 61820 

(217) 359-8482 Telex: 206995 



R**d*f Service No. 190 



AEAR1S 



he hits your computer is missing. 



M 



It's showtime. 
Time for ATARISOFT" to 
show you six exciting, brand 
new games that are destined 
for stardom. 

Games that can be played on 
your Commodore 64. IBM 
PC and Apple II. (Some titles 
available on IBM PCjr, and 
VIC 20?) 

First, there's Gremlins', 
based on the charac- 
ters from the original 
film presented by 
Steven Spielberg. 
Then there's Crystal 
Castles'" where 
Bentley Bear" journeys 
through all sorts of 
tantalizingly difficult 
paths and ramps in his 
endless quest for gems. 

In Donkey Kong Jr.- by 
Nintendo; Junior tries to 
rescue his father 
against immense 
odds. And speak- 
ing of Donkey 
Kong, there's also 
Mario Brothers' by 
Nintendo: This lime, 
Mario and his brother 
Luigi battle creatures on 
four levels of floors, en- 
countering all sorts of 
treacherous enemies. 

in Track And Field 1 you 
can compete by yourself or 



head-to-head with another 
player. But each player must 
beat qualifying times, heights 
and distances before they can 
compete in each of the gruel- 
ling six events. 

Typo Attack is the much- 
acclaimed, 
fun-filled 
program that 



TARISOFT 
10 BROS. *™SEI 
DONKEY KONG JR. «"8K 

TRACK A FIELD SffiSE 



CRYSTAL CASTLE 




allows you to enjoy i 
veloping your typing 
skills at any level. 

And still play- 
ing to the de- 
light of audiences everywhere 
are Pac-Man? Ms. Pac-Mani 
Jungle Hunt- Battlezone," 
Donkey Kong; by Nintendo; 
Centipede" and Pole 
Position': 

So. if you've been searching 
for ways to entertain your 
Commodore, Apple or IBM, 
treat it to one of the best 
shows in town, one of the hits 
from ATARISOFT. 

And don't forget the 
popcorn. 

ATARISOFT products are manufactured 
by Atari, Inc. for use with various computers 
and videogame consoles. ATARISOFT 
products are not made, licensed or approved 
by the manufacturer^) of those computers 
and video name consoles. 

♦Titles available on IBM PCjr, arc Ms. 
Pac-Man. Centipede, Donkey Kong. Moon 
Patrol' and Tvpo Attack. Available on the 
VIC 20 is Typo Attack. 

I. © 1984 Warner Brothers, Inc.; 2. 
Trademarks and © Nintendo. 1982. 1983; 3. 
Trademark of Konami Industry Co. .Ltd., 
© 1983 of Konami; 4. Trademarks of Bally 
Mfg. Co. Sublicensed to Atari. Inc. by 
Namco-America, Inc.; 5. Trademark and © 
of Taito America Corporation 1982; 6. 
Engineered iind designed by Namco 
Ltd.. manufactured under 
license bv Atari, Inc. Trade- 
mark and © Namco 1982; 7. 
Trademark and © Williams 
1982, manufactured under 
license from Williams 
Electronics, Inc. 

ATARISOI 










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